×

Country vs country: Australia and Taiwan compared: People stats

Compare vs for  

Definitions

  • Age structure > 0-14 years: The distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Age structure > 65 years and over: The distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest."
  • Birth rate: The average annual number of births during a year per 1,000 persons in the population at midyear; also known as crude birth rate. The birth rate is usually the dominant factor in determining the rate of population growth. It depends on both the level of fertility and the age structure of the population.
  • Death rate: The average annual number of deaths during a year per 1,000 population at midyear; also known as crude death rate. The death rate, while only a rough indicator of the mortality situation in a country, accurately indicates the current mortality impact on population growth. This indicator is significantly affected by age distribution, and most countries will eventually show a rise in the overall death rate, in spite of continued decline in mortality at all ages, as declining fertility results in an aging population.
  • Ethnic groups: This entry provides a rank ordering of ethnic groups starting with the largest and normally includes the percent of total population.
  • Languages: This entry provides a rank ordering of languages starting with the largest and sometimes includes the percent of total population speaking that language.
  • Median age > Total: This entry is derived from People > Median age, which is the age that divides a population into two numerically equal groups; that is, half the people are younger than this age and half are older. It is a single index that summarizes the age distribution of a population. Currently, the median age ranges from a low of about 15 in Uganda and Gaza Strip to 40 or more in several European countries and Japan. See the entry for "Age structure" for the importance of a young versus an older age structure and, by implication, a low versus a higher median age.
  • Nationality > Adjective: This entry is derived from People > Nationality, which provides the identifying terms for citizens - noun and adjective.
  • Population: Population, total refers to the total population.
  • Population growth rate: The average annual percent change in the population, resulting from a surplus (or deficit) of births over deaths and the balance of migrants entering and leaving a country. The rate may be positive or negative. The growth rate is a factor in determining how great a burden would be imposed on a country by the changing needs of its people for infrastructure (e.g., schools, hospitals, housing, roads), resources (e.g., food, water, electricity), and jobs. Rapid population growth can be seen as threatening by neighboring countries.
  • Religions: This entry is an ordered listing of religions by adherents starting with the largest group and sometimes includes the percent of total population. The core characteristics and beliefs of the world's major religions are described below.
    Baha'i - Founded by Mirza Husayn-Ali (known as Baha'u'llah) in Iran in 1852, Baha'i faith emphasizes monotheism and believes in one eternal transcendent God. Its guiding focus is to encourage the unity of all peoples on the earth so that justice and peace may be achieved on earth. Baha'i revelation contends the prophets of major world religions reflect some truth or element of the divine, believes all were manifestations of God given to specific communities in specific times, and that Baha'u'llah is an additional prophet meant to call all humankind. Bahais are an open community, located worldwide, with the greatest concentration of believers in South Asia.
    Buddhism - Religion or philosophy inspired by the 5th century B.C. teachings of Siddhartha Gautama (also known as Gautama Buddha "the enlightened one"). Buddhism focuses on the goal of spiritual enlightenment centered on an understanding of Gautama Buddha's Four Noble Truths on the nature of suffering, and on the Eightfold Path of spiritual and moral practice, to break the cycle of suffering of which we are a part. Buddhism ascribes to a karmic system of rebirth. Several schools and sects of Buddhism exist, differing often on the nature of the Buddha, the extent to which enlightenment can be achieved - for one or for all, and by whom - religious orders or laity.
    Basic Groupings
       Theravada Buddhism: The oldest Buddhist school, Theravada is practiced mostly in Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Laos, Burma, and Thailand, with minority representation elsewhere in Asia and the West. Theravadans follow the Pali Canon of Buddha's teachings, and believe that one may escape the cycle of rebirth, worldly attachment, and suffering for oneself; this process may take one or several lifetimes.
       Mahayana Buddhism, including subsets Zen and Tibetan (Lamaistic) Buddhism: Forms of Mahayana Buddhism are common in East Asia and Tibet, and parts of the West. Mahayanas have additional scriptures beyond the Pali Canon and believe the Buddha is eternal and still teaching. Unlike Theravada Buddhism, Mahayana schools maintain the Buddha-nature is present in all beings and all will ultimately achieve enlightenment.
        Hoa Hao: a minority tradition of Buddhism practiced in Vietnam that stresses lay participation, primarily by peasant farmers; it eschews ...
    Full definition






  • Sex ratio > At birth: The number of males for each female one of five age groups - at birth, under 15 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over, and for the total population. Sex ratio at birth has recently emerged as an indicator of certain kinds of sex discrimination in some countries. For instance, high sex ratios at birth in some Asian countries are now attributed to sex-selective abortion and infanticide due to a strong preference for sons. This will affect future marriage patterns and fertility patterns. Eventually it could cause unrest among young adult males who are unable to find partners.
  • Sex ratio > Total population: The number of males for each female one of five age groups - at birth, under 15 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over, and for the total population. Sex ratio at birth has recently emerged as an indicator of certain kinds of sex discrimination in some countries. For instance, high sex ratios at birth in some Asian countries are now attributed to sex-selective abortion and infanticide due to a strong preference for sons. This will affect future marriage patterns and fertility patterns. Eventually it could cause unrest among young adult males who are unable to find partners.
  • Sex ratio > Under 15 years: The number of males for each female one of five age groups - at birth, under 15 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over, and for the total population. Sex ratio at birth has recently emerged as an indicator of certain kinds of sex discrimination in some countries. For instance, high sex ratios at birth in some Asian countries are now attributed to sex-selective abortion and infanticide due to a strong preference for sons. This will affect future marriage patterns and fertility patterns. Eventually it could cause unrest among young adult males who are unable to find partners.
  • Total fertility rate: The average number of children that would be born per woman if all women lived to the end of their child-bearing years and bore children according to a given fertility rate at each age. The total fertility rate is a more direct measure of the level of fertility than the crude birth rate, since it refers to births per woman. This indicator shows the potential for population growth in the country. High rates will also place some limits on the labor force participation rates for women. Large numbers of children born to women indicate large family sizes that might limit the ability of the families to feed and educate their children.
  • Infant mortality rate > Total: This entry is derived from People > Infant mortality rate, which gives the number of deaths of infants under one year old in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year; included is the total death rate, and deaths by sex, male and female. This rate is often used as an indicator of the level of health in a country.
  • Migration > Net migration rate: The difference between the number of persons entering and leaving a country during the year per 1,000 persons (based on midyear population). An excess of persons entering the country is referred to as net immigration (e.g., 3.56 migrants/1,000 population); an excess of persons leaving the country as net emigration (e.g., -9.26 migrants/1,000 population). The net migration rate indicates the contribution of migration to the overall level of population change. High levels of migration can cause problems such as increasing unemployment and potential ethnic strife (if people are coming in) or a reduction in the labor force, perhaps in certain key sectors (if people are leaving).
  • Age structure > 15-24 years: This entry is derived from People > Age structure, which provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group as follows: 0-14 years (children), 15-24 years (early working age), 25-54 years (prime working age), 55-64 years (mature working age), 65 years and over (elderly). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Nationality > Noun: The noun which identifies citizens of the nation
  • Age structure > 15-64 years: The distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Life expectancy at birth > Total population: This entry is derived from People > Life expectancy at birth, which contains the average number of years to be lived by a group of people born in the same year, if mortality at each age remains constant in the future. The entry includes total population as well as the male and female components. Life expectancy at birth is also a measure of overall quality of life in a country and summarizes the mortality at all ages. It can also be thought of as indicating the potential return on investment in human capital and is necessary for the calculation of various actuarial measures.
  • Sex ratio > 65 years and over: The number of males for each female one of five age groups - at birth, under 15 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over, and for the total population. Sex ratio at birth has recently emerged as an indicator of certain kinds of sex discrimination in some countries. For instance, high sex ratios at birth in some Asian countries are now attributed to sex-selective abortion and infanticide due to a strong preference for sons. This will affect future marriage patterns and fertility patterns. Eventually it could cause unrest among young adult males who are unable to find partners.
  • Age structure > 25-54 years: This entry is derived from People > Age structure, which provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group as follows: 0-14 years (children), 15-24 years (early working age), 25-54 years (prime working age), 55-64 years (mature working age), 65 years and over (elderly). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Literacy > Total population: This entry is derived from People > Literacy, which includes a definition of literacy and Census Bureau percentages for the total population, males, and females. There are no universal definitions and standards of literacy. Unless otherwise specified, all rates are based on the most common definition - the ability to read and write at a specified age. Detailing the standards that individual countries use to assess the ability to read and write is beyond the scope of the Factbook. Information on literacy, while not a perfect measure of educational results, is probably the most easily available and valid for international comparisons. Low levels of literacy, and education in general, can impede the economic development of a country in the current rapidly changing, technology-driven world.
    Additional details:
    • Gibraltar: above 80% (2013)


  • Age structure > 55-64 years: This entry is derived from People > Age structure, which provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group as follows: 0-14 years (children), 15-24 years (early working age), 25-54 years (prime working age), 55-64 years (mature working age), 65 years and over (elderly). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Sex ratio > 15-64 years: The number of males for each female one of five age groups - at birth, under 15 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over, and for the total population. Sex ratio at birth has recently emerged as an indicator of certain kinds of sex discrimination in some countries. For instance, high sex ratios at birth in some Asian countries are now attributed to sex-selective abortion and infanticide due to a strong preference for sons. This will affect future marriage patterns and fertility patterns. Eventually it could cause unrest among young adult males who are unable to find partners.
  • Population > CIA Factbook: This entry gives an estimate from the US Bureau of the Census based on statistics from population censuses, vital statistics registration systems, or sample surveys pertaining to the recent past and on assumptions about future trends. The total population presents one overall measure of the potential impact of the country on the world and within its region. Note: starting with the 1993 Factbook, demographic estimates for some countries (mostly African) have explicitly taken into account the effects of the growing impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. These countries are currently: The Bahamas, Benin, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burma, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Republic of the Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
  • Nobel prize laureates: Number of Nobel Prize Laureates 1901-2002
  • Life expectancy at birth > Female: This entry is derived from People > Life expectancy at birth, which contains the average number of years to be lived by a group of people born in the same year, if mortality at each age remains constant in the future. The entry includes total population as well as the male and female components. Life expectancy at birth is also a measure of overall quality of life in a country and summarizes the mortality at all ages. It can also be thought of as indicating the potential return on investment in human capital and is necessary for the calculation of various actuarial measures.
  • Cities > Urban population: Total population living in urban areas. The defition of an urban area differs for each country. Future estimates are from the UN Population Division.
  • Life expectancy at birth > Male: This entry is derived from People > Life expectancy at birth, which contains the average number of years to be lived by a group of people born in the same year, if mortality at each age remains constant in the future. The entry includes total population as well as the male and female components. Life expectancy at birth is also a measure of overall quality of life in a country and summarizes the mortality at all ages. It can also be thought of as indicating the potential return on investment in human capital and is necessary for the calculation of various actuarial measures.
  • Age structure > 65 years and over > From total: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Total Population > Female: Total Population - Female, as of April 26, 2005
  • Median age > Both sexes: Age of person who is older than half the population and younger than the other half of the population.
  • Age structure > 0-14 years > Females: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Cities > Urban areas over 1,000,000: Urban areas with a population of over a million people.
  • Age structure > 0-14 years > From total: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Literacy > Definition: This entry is derived from People > Literacy, which includes a definition of literacy and Census Bureau percentages for the total population, males, and females. There are no universal definitions and standards of literacy. Unless otherwise specified, all rates are based on the most common definition - the ability to read and write at a specified age. Detailing the standards that individual countries use to assess the ability to read and write is beyond the scope of the Factbook. Information on literacy, while not a perfect measure of educational results, is probably the most easily available and valid for international comparisons. Low levels of literacy, and education in general, can impede the economic development of a country in the current rapidly changing, technology-driven world.
  • Age structure > 0-14 years > Males: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Charity > World Giving Index: 2011.
  • Age structure > 65 years and over > Females: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Infant mortality rate > Female: This entry is derived from People > Infant mortality rate, which gives the number of deaths of infants under one year old in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year; included is the total death rate, and deaths by sex, male and female. This rate is often used as an indicator of the level of health in a country.
  • Infant mortality rate > Male: This entry is derived from People > Infant mortality rate, which gives the number of deaths of infants under one year old in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year; included is the total death rate, and deaths by sex, male and female. This rate is often used as an indicator of the level of health in a country.
  • Median age > Female: This entry is derived from People > Median age, which is the age that divides a population into two numerically equal groups; that is, half the people are younger than this age and half are older. It is a single index that summarizes the age distribution of a population. Currently, the median age ranges from a low of about 15 in Uganda and Gaza Strip to 40 or more in several European countries and Japan. See the entry for "Age structure" for the importance of a young versus an older age structure and, by implication, a low versus a higher median age.
  • Age structure > 15-64 years > Males: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Immigration > Destination countries of nationalities and ethnic groups > Greeks: Members of the Greek diaspora by country of residence. Whether a member of the diaspora is defined as a Greek citizen, by ancestry or by self-identification varies by country.
  • Cities > Urban areas over 2,000,000: Urban Areas Over 2,000,000.
  • Age structure > 15-64 years > From total: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Immigration > Cultural Diversity Index: The probability that two individuals selected at random from a country speak a very different language. A high score of close to 1 indicates that many unrelated languages are spoken. A score of close to 0 means that few languages are spoken, and / or that the spoken languages are similar to one another. For more information, please refer to Fearon (see citation).
  • Immigration > Visas > Visa requirements for > Austrian citizens > Length of stay permitted: Length of stay permitted.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Cities > Urban areas over 500,000: Urban Areas Over 500,000.
  • Charity > World Giving Index > Helped a stranger, percent: HS.
  • Age structure > 15-64 years > Females: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Cities > Urban areas over 1,000,000 per million people: Urban areas with a population of over a million people.
  • Median age > Male: This entry is the age that divides a population into two numerically equal groups; that is, half the people are younger than this age and half are older. It is a single index that summarizes the age distribution of a population. Currently, the median age ranges from a low of about 15 in Uganda and Gaza Strip to 40 or more in several European countries and Japan. See the entry for "Age structure" for the importance of a young versus an older age structure and, by implication, a low versus a higher median age.
  • Immigration > Ethnic Fractionalization Index: The probability that two individuals selected at random from a country will be from different ethnic groups, 0 meaning that each individual in this country is from the same ethnic group. For a discussion of what constitutes an ethnic group, please refer to Fearon (see citation).
  • Charity > World Giving Index > Donated money, percent: DM.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Immigration > Destination countries of nationalities and ethnic groups > Jews > Enlarged Jewish population per thousand people:

    Jewish population by country. The enlarged Jewish community includes Jews, non-Jews with Jewish ancestry and non-Jewish members of Jewish households.   

    . Figures expressed per thousand people for the same year.
  • Age structure > 65 years and over > Males: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Immigration > Nationality compositions of Canada, share of immigrants: Portion of immigrants in Canada.
  • Cities > Urban areas over 500,000 per million people: Urban Areas Over 500,000. Figures expressed per million people for the same year.
  • Immigration > Nationality compositions of > Norway: Country of origin of Norway’s population who was either foreign born or born in Norway to foreign residents (number of people by country of origin).
  • Cities > Urban areas over 2,000,000 per million people: Urban Areas Over 2,000,000. Figures expressed per million people for the same year.
  • Immigration > Nationality compositions of > Norway per million people: Country of origin of Norway’s population who was either foreign born or born in Norway to foreign residents (number of people by country of origin). Figures expressed per million people for the same year.
  • Total population > Age 80-84: Total population - Age 80-84, as of April 26, 2005
  • Male population > Age 25-29: Male population - Age 25-29, as of April 26, 2005
  • Cities > Urban population per thousand people: Total population living in urban areas. The defition of an urban area differs for each country. Future estimates are from the UN Population Division. Figures expressed per thousand people for the same year.
  • Charity > World Giving Index > Volunteered time: VT.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Immigration > Destination countries of nationalities and ethnic groups > Jews > Percent Jewish: Proportion of country’s population that is Jewish.
  • Female population > Age 25-29: Female population - Age 25-29, as of April 26, 2005
  • Male population > Age 10-14: Male population - Age 10-14, as of April 26, 2005
  • Total population > Age 25-29: Total population - Age 25-29, as of April 26, 2005
  • Total population > Age 70-74: Total population - Age 70-74, as of April 26, 2005
  • Total population > Age 30-34: Total population - Age 30-34, as of April 26, 2005
  • Male population > Age 40-44: Male population - Age 40-44, as of April 26, 2005
  • Total Population > Thousands: Total Population, thousands, as of April 26, 2005
  • Female population > Age 20-24: Female population - Age 20-24, as of April 26, 2005
  • Female population > Age 10-14: Female population - Age 10-14, as of April 26, 2005
  • Male population > Age 15-19: Male population - Age 15-19, as of April 26, 2005
  • Total population > Age 45-49: Total population - Age 45-49, as of April 26, 2005
  • Female population > Age 15-19: Female population - Age 15-19, as of April 26, 2005
STAT Australia Taiwan HISTORY
Age structure > 0-14 years 18.1%
Ranked 168th. 27% more than Taiwan
14.3%
Ranked 212th.

Age structure > 65 years and over 14.7%
Ranked 44th. 27% more than Taiwan
11.6%
Ranked 65th.

Birth rate 12.23 births/1,000 population
Ranked 162nd. 42% more than Taiwan
8.61 births/1,000 population
Ranked 215th.

Death rate 7.01 deaths/1,000 population
Ranked 132nd. 3% more than Taiwan
6.83 deaths/1,000 population
Ranked 138th.

Ethnic groups white 92%, Asian 7%, aboriginal and other 1% Taiwanese (including Hakka) 84%, mainland Chinese 14%, indigenous 2%
Languages English 78.5%, Chinese 2.5%, Italian 1.6%, Greek 1.3%, Arabic 1.2%, Vietnamese 1%, other 8.2%, unspecified 5.7% Mandarin Chinese (official), Taiwanese (Min), Hakka dialects
Median age > Total 38.1 years
Ranked 57th.
38.7 years
Ranked 52nd. 2% more than Australia

Nationality > Adjective Australian Taiwan (or Taiwanese)
Population 22.26 million
Ranked 55th.
23.3 million
Ranked 51st. 5% more than Australia

Population growth rate 1.11%
Ranked 106th. 4 times more than Taiwan
0.27%
Ranked 170th.

Religions Protestant 27.4% (Anglican 18.7%, Uniting Church 5.7%, Presbyterian and Reformed 3%), Catholic 25.8%, Eastern Orthodox 2.7%, other Christian 7.9%, Buddhist 2.1%, Muslim 1.7%, other 2.4%, unspecified 11.3%, none 18.7% mixture of Buddhist and Taoist 93%, Christian 4.5%, other 2.5%
Sex ratio > At birth 1.06 male(s)/female
Ranked 63th.
1.07 male(s)/female
Ranked 22nd. 1% more than Australia

Sex ratio > Total population 1.01 male(s)/female
Ranked 64th. 1% more than Taiwan
1 male(s)/female
Ranked 82nd.

Sex ratio > Under 15 years 1.05 male(s)/female
Ranked 91st.
1.08 male(s)/female
Ranked 24th. 3% more than Australia

Total fertility rate 1.77 children born/woman
Ranked 156th. 59% more than Taiwan
1.11 children born/woman
Ranked 218th.

Infant mortality rate > Total 4.49 deaths/1,000 live births
Ranked 189th.
4.55 deaths/1,000 live births
Ranked 185th. 1% more than Australia

Migration > Net migration rate 6.34 migrant(s)/1,000 populati
Ranked 18th. 159 times more than Taiwan
0.04 migrant(s)/1,000 populati
Ranked 74th.

Age structure > 15-24 years 13.4%
Ranked 175th.
13.7%
Ranked 170th. 2% more than Australia
Nationality > Noun Australian(s) Taiwan (singular and plural)
Age structure > 15-64 years 67.5%
Ranked 85th.
74%
Ranked 9th. 10% more than Australia

Life expectancy at birth > Total population 81.98 years
Ranked 10th. 3% more than Taiwan
79.71 years
Ranked 38th.

Sex ratio > 65 years and over 0.85 male(s)/female
Ranked 73th.
0.89 male(s)/female
Ranked 49th. 5% more than Australia

Age structure > 25-54 years 42%
Ranked 92nd.
47.7%
Ranked 14th. 14% more than Australia
Literacy > Total population 99%
Ranked 45th. 3% more than Taiwan
96.1%
Ranked 87th.

Age structure > 55-64 years 11.8%
Ranked 56th.
12.7%
Ranked 34th. 8% more than Australia
Sex ratio > 15-64 years 1.03
Ranked 53th. 2% more than Taiwan
1.01
Ranked 88th.

Population > CIA Factbook 21.01 million
Ranked 54th.
22.92 million
Ranked 50th. 9% more than Australia

Nobel prize laureates 6
Ranked 16th.
0.0
Ranked 38th.
Life expectancy at birth > Female 84.54 years
Ranked 13th. 2% more than Taiwan
83.06 years
Ranked 29th.

Cities > Urban population 95,896
Ranked 18th. 1229 times more than Taiwan
78
Ranked 56th.
Life expectancy at birth > Male 79.55 years
Ranked 9th. 4% more than Taiwan
76.58 years
Ranked 40th.

Age structure > 65 years and over > From total 13.3%
Ranked 44th. 27% more than Taiwan
10.5%
Ranked 62nd.

Total Population > Female 10.18 million
Ranked 53th.
11.31 million
Ranked 49th. 11% more than Australia
Median age > Both sexes 37.5
Ranked 51st. 1% more than Taiwan
37
Ranked 55th.
Age structure > 0-14 years > Females 1.92 million
Ranked 73th. 1% more than Taiwan
1.9 million
Ranked 75th.

Cities > Urban areas over 1,000,000 5
Ranked 19th. 25% more than Taiwan
4
Ranked 23th.
Age structure > 0-14 years > From total 18.8%
Ranked 165th. 9% more than Taiwan
17.3%
Ranked 177th.

Literacy > Definition age 15 and over can read and write age 15 and over can read and write
Age structure > 0-14 years > Males 2.02 million
Ranked 73th.
2.06 million
Ranked 72nd. 2% more than Australia

Charity > World Giving Index 3
Ranked 57th.
67
Ranked 10th. 22 times more than Australia
Age structure > 65 years and over > Females 1.53 million
Ranked 30th. 24% more than Taiwan
1.23 million
Ranked 37th.

Infant mortality rate > Female 4.15 deaths/1,000 live births
Ranked 186th. 1% more than Taiwan
4.12 deaths/1,000 live births
Ranked 187th.

Infant mortality rate > Male 4.8 deaths/1,000 live births
Ranked 187th.
4.96 deaths/1,000 live births
Ranked 185th. 3% more than Australia

Median age > Female 38.8 years
Ranked 57th.
39.4 years
Ranked 56th. 2% more than Australia

Age structure > 15-64 years > Males 7.23 million
Ranked 51st.
8.36 million
Ranked 44th. 16% more than Australia

Immigration > Destination countries of nationalities and ethnic groups > Greeks 700,000
Ranked 2nd. 35000 times more than Taiwan
20
Ranked 69th.
Cities > Urban areas over 2,000,000 2
Ranked 29th.
3
Ranked 15th. 50% more than Australia
Age structure > 15-64 years > From total 67.9%
Ranked 61st.
72.3%
Ranked 12th. 6% more than Australia

Immigration > Cultural Diversity Index 0.147
Ranked 109th.
0.169
Ranked 101st. 15% more than Australia
Immigration > Visas > Visa requirements for > Austrian citizens > Length of stay permitted 3 months 90 days
Cities > Urban areas over 500,000 6
Ranked 31st. 20% more than Taiwan
5
Ranked 33th.
Charity > World Giving Index > Helped a stranger, percent 67%
Ranked 11th. 52% more than Taiwan
44%
Ranked 73th.
Age structure > 15-64 years > Females 7.04 million
Ranked 52nd.
8.2 million
Ranked 44th. 17% more than Australia

Cities > Urban areas over 1,000,000 per million people 0.225
Ranked 9th. 31% more than Taiwan
0.172
Ranked 20th.
Median age > Male 37.3 years
Ranked 51st.
38 years
Ranked 45th. 2% more than Australia

Immigration > Ethnic Fractionalization Index 0.149
Ranked 132nd.
0.274
Ranked 108th. 84% more than Australia
Charity > World Giving Index > Donated money, percent 76%
Ranked 2nd. 77% more than Taiwan
43%
Ranked 28th.
Immigration > Destination countries of nationalities and ethnic groups > Jews > Enlarged Jewish population per thousand people 5.95
Ranked 11th. 691 times more than Taiwan
0.00861
Ranked 87th.
Age structure > 65 years and over > Males 1.27 million
Ranked 30th. 8% more than Taiwan
1.17 million
Ranked 31st.

Immigration > Nationality compositions of Canada, share of immigrants 0.3%
Ranked 62nd.
1.1%
Ranked 24th. 4 times more than Australia
Cities > Urban areas over 500,000 per million people 0.27
Ranked 25th. 26% more than Taiwan
0.215
Ranked 40th.
Immigration > Nationality compositions of > Norway 1,430
Ranked 57th. 6 times more than Taiwan
244
Ranked 113th.
Cities > Urban areas over 2,000,000 per million people 0.0898
Ranked 16th.
0.129
Ranked 7th. 43% more than Australia
Immigration > Nationality compositions of > Norway per million people 64.23
Ranked 74th. 6 times more than Taiwan
10.47
Ranked 119th.
Total population > Age 80-84 731,499
Ranked 19th. 3 times more than Taiwan
287,772
Ranked 34th.
Male population > Age 25-29 684,704
Ranked 57th.
1.02 million
Ranked 45th. 48% more than Australia
Cities > Urban population per thousand people 4e-06
Ranked 143th. 18% more than Taiwan
3.38e-06
Ranked 148th.
Charity > World Giving Index > Volunteered time 37%
Ranked 12th. 2 times more than Taiwan
16%
Ranked 73th.
Immigration > Destination countries of nationalities and ethnic groups > Jews > Percent Jewish 0.613%
Ranked 11th.
0.0
Ranked 91st.
Female population > Age 25-29 659,521
Ranked 58th.
969,285
Ranked 46th. 47% more than Australia
Male population > Age 10-14 714,840
Ranked 69th.
828,943
Ranked 59th. 16% more than Australia
Total population > Age 25-29 1.34 million
Ranked 58th.
1.99 million
Ranked 46th. 48% more than Australia
Total population > Age 70-74 613,782
Ranked 32nd. 3% more than Taiwan
595,735
Ranked 33th.
Total population > Age 30-34 1.48 million
Ranked 52nd.
1.8 million
Ranked 47th. 21% more than Australia
Male population > Age 40-44 753,683
Ranked 42nd.
969,381
Ranked 34th. 29% more than Australia
Total Population > Thousands 20,090
Ranked 52nd.
22,894
Ranked 48th. 14% more than Australia
Female population > Age 20-24 674,398
Ranked 61st.
903,008
Ranked 51st. 34% more than Australia
Female population > Age 10-14 681,950
Ranked 69th.
764,266
Ranked 61st. 12% more than Australia
Male population > Age 15-19 713,470
Ranked 64th.
813,705
Ranked 59th. 14% more than Australia
Total population > Age 45-49 1.47 million
Ranked 37th.
1.81 million
Ranked 32nd. 23% more than Australia
Female population > Age 15-19 680,723
Ranked 66th.
754,585
Ranked 60th. 11% more than Australia

SOURCES: CIA World Factbook, 28 July 2005; CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; CIA World Factbooks 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013; World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; All CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 18 December 2008; The Nobel Foundation; United Nations Population Division. Source tables; U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division, International Programs Center Spanish Statistical Institute; https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/fields/2177.html, median age; Demographia World Urban Areas (Built-Up Urban Areas and World Agglomerations): 10th Annual Edition, May 2014 Revision, Table 1, p. 20 ff.); Wikipedia: World Giving Index (World Giving Index); Wikipedia: Greek diaspora (List of countries and territories by Greek population); Wikipedia: List of urban areas by population (Number of urban areas by country) (Demographia World Urban Areas (World Agglomerations): 9th Annual Edition, March 2013); Ethnic and Cultural Diversity By Country. James D. Faeron. Journal of Economic Growth, 8, 195-222, 2003, p. 215 ff.; Wikipedia: Visa requirements for Austrian citizens (Africa); Demographia World Urban Areas (Built-Up Urban Areas and World Agglomerations): 10th Annual Edition, May 2014 Revision, Table 1, p. 20 ff.; Ethnic and Cultural Diversity By Country. James D. Faeron. Journal of Economic Growth, 8, 195-222, 2003, p. 215 ff.; https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:Rv2hLhme008J:www.jewishdatabank.org/Reports/World_Jewish_Population_2010.pdf+world+jewish+population+2010&hl=en&gl=us&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEEShFmlEo2XYeBjYVUGgz_STm8ZXvaFqIMHdpfxUC8uWpDuLqb9l7GvJbF2piXHqxgDaGkOY3jfCA_RkpUlKLSByoSQC3cLV-5LcpxgXggqUIYwzK9hdfmwVv4Sz0BdeFMxJ_-2To&sig=AHIEtbT5tVUek4PSi_N_5f0Dwe-11sBzMg, Number 2 - 2010. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Sergio DellaPergola. p. 60. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; Wikipedia: Immigration to Canada (Canadian permanent resident population by country of birth) ([1] , Place of birth for the immigrant population by period of immigration, 2006 counts and percentages [1] , Population by immigrant status and period of immigration, 2006 counts, for Canada, provinces and territories); Wikipedia: List of urban areas by population (Number of urban areas by country) (Demographia World Urban Areas (World Agglomerations): 9th Annual Edition, March 2013). Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; http://www.ssb.no/en/innvbef; http://www.ssb.no/en/innvbef. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division, International Programs Center; United Nations Population Division. Source tables. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Judaism/jewpop.html, Jewish Population of the World. 2012.; U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division, International Programs Center Spanish Statistical Institute

Citation

"People: Australia and Taiwan compared", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/compare/Australia/Taiwan/People

Ask A Question

captcha

Was this page useful for you?