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Country vs country: Canada and Switzerland compared: Health

Definitions

  • Access to sanitation: The percentage of the total population with access to sanitation facilities
  • Contraception: % contraceptive prevalence 1995 - 2000. Data refer to married women aged 15-49, but the actual age range covered may vary across countries.
  • Daily smokers: Data on tobacco consumption - this is a percentage of the total population who smoke at least one cigarette a day.(Data for Portugal and Austria is from 2002. All other data is from 2003).
  • Dependency ratio per 100: Dependency ratio (per 100), 2003
  • Drug access: Population with access to essential drugs 2000. The data on access to essential drugs are based on statistical estimates received from World Health Organization (WHO) country and regional offices and regional advisers and through the World Drug Situation Survey carried out in 1998-99. These estimates represent the best information available to the WHO Department of Essential Drugs and Medicines Policy to date and are currently being validated by WHO member states. The department assigns the estimates to four groupings: very low access (0-49%), low access (50-79%), medium access (80-94%) and good access (95-100%). These groupings, used here in presenting the data, are often employed by the WHO in interpreting the data, as the actual estimates may suggest a higher level of accuracy than the data afford. b.
  • Infant mortality rate > Total: This entry gives the number of deaths of infants under one year old in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year; included is the total death rate, and deaths by sex, male and female. This rate is often used as an indicator of the level of health in a country.
  • Motor vehicle deaths: Fatalities per 100000 population due to motor vehicle accidents (1999).
  • Nurses: Number of nurses per 1,000 people. Data is for 2000.
  • Obesity: Percentage of total population who have a BMI (body mass index) greater than 30 Kg/sq.meters (Data for Australia, Austria and Portugal is from 2002. All other data is from 2003). Obesity rates are defined as the percentage of the population with a Body Mass Index (BMI) over 30. The BMI is a single number that evaluates an individual's weight status in relation to height (weight/height2, with weight in kilograms and height in metres). For Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States, figures are based on health examinations, rather than self-reported information. Obesity estimates derived from health examinations are generally higher and more reliable than those coming from self-reports, because they preclude any misreporting of people's height and weight. However, health examinations are only conducted regularly in a few countries (OECD).
  • Red Cross donations: Amounts of the contributions to the International Committee of the Red Cross by the Council of Europe member states and states with an observer status in the PACE in the period from 1996 to 2000 (in Swiss Francs)
  • Spending > Per person: Spending per capita (PPP) in $US 1998.
  • Teen birth rate: Average number of births for every 1,000 girls aged 15 to 19
  • Teenage pregnancy: Number of births to women aged below twenty. Data for 1998.
  • Tobacco > Total adult smokers: Total adults smoking
  • Transplants > Kidney: The number of kidney transplants in the nation in 2002. (If the surveyed year is different, it is given in brackets).
  • Life expectancy > Healthy years: Estimated number of years of life while healthy, as defined by the OECD. Estimates for 2001. See source for details.
  • Transplants > Heart: The number of heart transplants in the nation in 2002. (If the surveyed year is different, it is given in brackets).
  • Suicide rate > Gender ratio: Suicide rates per 100,000 people
  • Transplants > Liver: The number of liver transplants in the nation in 2002.(If the surveyed year is different, it is given in brackets).
  • Death rates > Men: Adult mortality rate is the probability of dying between the ages of 15 and 60--that is, the probability of a 15-year-old dying before reaching age 60, if subject to current age-specific mortality rates between those ages."
  • SARS total cases: Total cases of SARS in given countries
  • Births > Low birth weight: Percentage of live births classified by the OECD as of low birth weight. Data generally for 2000; in some cases, data is for 1999, 1998, or, in the sole case of Belgium, 1997. Refer to the source for details.
  • Acute care beds: Number of beds for acute care per 1,000 people (Data is for 2001).
  • Suicide rate > Young males: Suicide death rates (per 100,000 of population) among 15 to 24 year-olds, various countries, latest available data, 1991 to 1993
  • Practising physicians: Number of doctors in the country per 1,000 people (Data for 2002).
  • Total fertility rate: Total fertility rate, 2003
  • Duration of hospitalisation: Average length of stay in a hospital per patient admitted to acute care (2000).
  • Child maltreatment deaths: Child maltreatment deaths per 100000 population under 15 (1990s).
  • Intestinal diseases death rate: Death rate from intestinal infectious diseases
    Units: Deaths/100,000 Population
    Units: The final number is based on an aggregation of deaths recorded for WHO code B01 for all age groups by sex. These were then combined with UN Population Division population data for the country in that particular year. The death rates were standardized utilizing the age structure for the population of Canada. See page 22 of the2001 ESI report for more details on the methodology.
  • Transplants > Lung: The number of lung transplants in the nation in 2002. (If the surveyed year is different, it is given in brackets).
  • Infant mortality rate > Female: This entry gives the number of deaths of infants under one year old in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year; included is the total death rate, and deaths by sex, male and female. This rate is often used as an indicator of the level of health in a country.
  • Circulatory disease deaths: Standardised death rates per 100 000 population (1999).
  • Infant mortality rate > Male: This entry gives the number of deaths of infants under one year old in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year; included is the total death rate, and deaths by sex, male and female. This rate is often used as an indicator of the level of health in a country.
  • Suicide rate > Young females: Suicide death rates (per 100,000 of population) among 15 to 24 year-olds, various countries, latest available data, 1991 to 1993
  • Life expectancy > Male: Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life.
  • Life expectancy > Female: Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life.
  • SARS fatalities: Number of deaths
  • Death rates > Infants: Infant mortality rate is the number of infants dying before reaching one year of age, per 1,000 live births in a given year."
  • Spending > Public: World Bank. 2002. World Development Indicators 2002. CD-ROM. Washington, DC.
  • Death rates > Women: Adult mortality rate is the probability of dying between the ages of 15 and 60--that is, the probability of a 15-year-old dying before reaching age 60, if subject to current age-specific mortality rates between those ages."
  • Transplants > Total: The total of our statistics for kidney, liver, pancreas, kidney-pancreas, heart, lung, heart-lung and intestine transplants. Note that, in some cases, the figures for each individual organ type were taken in different years (either 2000, 2001, or 2002). Thus these totals are suggestive but not conclusive.
  • Child injury death index: Child injury death" index is defined as the annual number of deaths from injuries (unintentional and intentional) among 1 to 14 year old children per 10,000 children of those ages.
  • Spending > Private: Private expenditure on health as a percentage of GDP 1998.
  • Smoking rate > Women: Prevalence of smoking, female is the percentage of women ages 15 and over who smoke any form of tobacco, including cigarettes, cigars, and pipes, and excluding smokeless tobacco. Data include daily and non-daily smoking."
  • SARS median age range: Median age range for SARS infected persons
  • Transplants > Kidney and pancreas: The number of kidney-pancreas transplants in the nation in 2002. (If the surveyed year is different, it is given in brackets).
  • Daily smokers > 1990: Data on tobacco consumption - this is a percentage of the total population who smoked at least one cigarette a day in 1990.
  • Health services > Outpatient visits per capita: Outpatient visits per capita are the number of visits to health care facilities per capita, including repeat visits."
  • Health services > Physicians > Per 1,000 people: Physicians include generalist and specialist medical practitioners.
  • Health spending > % of GDP: Total health expenditure is the sum of public and private health expenditure. It covers the provision of health services (preventive and curative), family planning activities, nutrition activities, and emergency aid designated for health but does not include provision of water and sanitation."
  • Health spending per capita: Total health expenditure is the sum of public and private health expenditures as a ratio of total population. It covers the provision of health services (preventive and curative), family planning activities, nutrition activities, and emergency aid designated for health but does not include provision of water and sanitation. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • Nutrition > Depth of hunger > Kilocalories per person per day: Depth of hunger or the intensity of food deprivation, indicates how much food-deprived people fall short of minimum food needs in terms of dietary energy. The food deficit, in kilocalories per person per day, is measured by comparing the average amount of dietary energy that undernourished people get from the foods they eat with the minimum amount of dietary energy they need to maintain body weight and undertake light activity. The depth of hunger is low when it is less than 200 kilocalories per person per day, and high when it is higher than 300 kilocalories per person per day."
  • Nutrition > Low-birthweight babies > % of births: Low-birthweight babies are newborns weighing less than 2,500 grams, with the measurement taken within the first hours of life, before significant postnatal weight loss has occurred."
  • Nutrition > Prevalence of undernourishment > % of population: Population below minimum level of dietary energy consumption (also referred to as prevalence of undernourishment) shows the percentage of the population whose food intake is insufficient to meet dietary energy requirements continuously. Data showing as 2.5 signifies a prevalence of undernourishment below 2.5%.
  • Private health spending > % of GDP: Private health expenditure includes direct household (out-of-pocket) spending, private insurance, charitable donations, and direct service payments by private corporations."
  • Public health spending > % of GDP: Public health expenditure consists of recurrent and capital spending from government (central and local) budgets, external borrowings and grants (including donations from international agencies and nongovernmental organisations), and social (or compulsory) health insurance funds."
  • Public health spending > % of government spending: Public health expenditure consists of recurrent and capital spending from government (central and local) budgets, external borrowings and grants (including donations from international agencies and nongovernmental organisations), and social (or compulsory) health insurance funds."
  • Public health spending > % of total health spending: Public health expenditure consists of recurrent and capital spending from government (central and local) budgets, external borrowings and grants (including donations from international agencies and nongovernmental organisations), and social (or compulsory) health insurance funds. Total health expenditure is the sum of public and private health expenditure. It covers the provision of health services (preventive and curative), family planning activities, nutrition activities, and emergency aid designated for health but does not include provision of water and sanitation."
  • Reproductive health > Births attended by skilled health staff > % of total: Births attended by skilled health staff are the percentage of deliveries attended by personnel trained to give the necessary supervision, care, and advice to women during pregnancy, labor, and the postpartum period; to conduct deliveries on their own; and to care for newborns."
  • Reproductive health > Maternal mortality ratio > Modeled estimate > Per 100,000 live births: Maternal mortality ratio is the number of women who die during pregnancy and childbirth, per 100,000 live births. The data are estimated with a regression model using information on fertility, birth attendants, and HIV prevalence."
  • Risk factors > Female adults with HIV > % of population ages 15+ with HIV: Prevalence of HIV is the percentage of people who are infected with HIV. Female rate is as a percentage of the total population with HIV.
  • Risk factors > Prevalence of HIV > Female > % ages 15-24: Prevalence of HIV is the percentage of people who are infected with HIV. Youth rates are as a percentage of the relevant age group.
  • Risk factors > Incidence of tuberculosis > Per 100,000 people: Incidence of tuberculosis is the estimated number of new pulmonary, smear positive, and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis cases."
  • Risk factors > Prevalence of HIV > Male > % ages 15-24: Prevalence of HIV is the percentage of people who are infected with HIV. Youth rates are as a percentage of the relevant age group.
  • Risk factors > Prevalence of HIV > Total > % of population ages 15-49: Prevalence of HIV refers to the percentage of people ages 15-49 who are infected with HIV.
  • Survival rate > To age 65 > Men: Survival to age 65 refers to the percentage of a cohort of newborn infants that would survive to age 65, if subject to current age specific mortality rates."
  • Survival rate > To age 65 > Women: Survival to age 65 refers to the percentage of a cohort of newborn infants that would survive to age 65, if subject to current age specific mortality rates."
  • Total expenditure on health as % of GDP: Total expenditure on health as % of GDP, 2002
  • Probability of reaching 65 > Male: Probability at birth of reaching the age of 65.
  • Percentage of life lived in ill health > Female: Estimated percentage of total years of expected lifespan to be lived in ill health. Estimated for females at birth. Data for 2001. See source for further details.
  • Tuberculosis cases > Per 100,000: Tuberculosis cases (per 100,000 people)
  • Years lived in ill health > Female: Average number of years that females will live in ill health; estimated at birth. Data for 2001. See source for details.
  • Drinking water availability %: Coverage estimates shown are derived from information collected from two main sources: assessment questionnaires and household surveys. Assessment questionnaires were sent to all WHO country representatives, to be completed in liaison with local UNICEF st
  • Private expenditure on health as % of total expenditure on health: Private expenditure on health as % of total expenditure on health, 2002
  • Years lived in ill health > Male: Average number of years that males will live in ill health; estimated at birth. Data for 2001. See source for details.
  • Respiratory disease child death rate: Child death rate from respiratory diseases
    Units: Deaths/100,000 Population Aged 0-14
    Units: The final number is based on an aggregation of deaths recorded for WHO codes B31 and B320, and B321, by sex and by age. These were then combined with UN Population Division population data broken down by age group to produce rates. See page 22 of the 2001 ESI report for more details on the methodology.
  • Health care funding > Private per capita: Private funding of health care expenditure, in US $ PPP per capita. Data for 2000.
  • Public spending as % of total: Public expenditure on health as a % of total expenditure on health (Data for year 2002).
  • Per capita total expenditure on health in international dollars: Per capita total expenditure on health in international dollars, 2002
  • Per capita government expenditure on health in international dollars: Per capita government expenditure on health in international dollars, 2002
  • % of population using adequate sanitation facilities > Total: Health - % of population using adequate sanitation facilities 2000 - Total
  • Health care funding > Public per capita: Public funding of health care expenditure, in US $ PPP per capita. Data for 2000.
  • Probability of dying before 5 > Females: Probability of females dying before reaching the age of 5. (2003)
  • Life expectancy at birth > Years > Males: Life expectancy at birth (years) 2003 - Males
  • Out-of-pocket expenditure as % of private health expenditure: Out-of-pocket expenditure on health as % of private expenditure on health, 2002
  • Transplants > Kidney and pancreas per million: The number of kidney-pancreas transplants in the nation in 2002. (If the surveyed year is different, it is given in brackets). Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Life expectancy > Female healthy years: Number of years of life while 'healthy', as defined by the OECD. Estimates for 2001. See source for details.
  • Healthy life expectancy at birth > Years > Total population: Healthy life expectancy at birth (years) 2002 - Total population
  • Percentage of life lived in ill health > Males: Estimated percentage of total years of expected lifespan to be lived in ill health. Estimated for males at birth. Data for 2001. See source for further details.
  • Probability of reaching 65 > Female: Probability at birth of reaching the age of 65.
  • % immunized 1-year-old children > DPT3: Health - % immunized 2002 1-year-old children - DPT3
  • Healthy life expectancy at birth > Years > Females: Healthy life expectancy at birth (years) 2002 - Females
  • % of population using improved drinking water sources > Total: Health - % of population using improved drinking water sources 2000 - Total
  • Life expectancy at birth > Years > Females: Life expectancy at birth (years) 2003 - Females
  • Healthy life expectancy at birth > Years > Males: Healthy life expectancy at birth (years) 2002 - Males
  • Prepaid plans as % of private expenditure on health: Prepaid plans as % of private expenditure on health, 2002
  • External resources for health as % of total expenditure on health: External resources for health as % of total expenditure on health, 2002
  • % of population using improved drinking water sources > Rural: Health - % of population using improved drinking water sources 2000 - Rural.
  • % of population using adequate sanitation facilities > Rural: Health - % of population using adequate sanitation facilities 2000 - Rural
  • % of population using improved drinking water sources > Urban: Health - % of population using improved drinking water sources 2000 - Urban
  • % of population using adequate sanitation facilities > Urban: Health - % of population using adequate sanitation facilities 2000 - Urban
  • HIV AIDS > Women living with aids 15-49: People living with HIV/AIDS, women (age 15-49)
  • SARS fatality ratio %: Case fatality ratio (%)
  • SARS female cases %: Percentage of the female population relative to the total infected population
  • HIVAIDS > Adult prevalence rate 15-49 years,: Health - HIV/AIDS - Adult prevalence rate (15-49 years), end-2001
  • Obesity > Overweight and obese population aged 15 or more: The most frequently used measure of overweight and obesity is based on the body mass index (BMI), which is a single number that evaluates an individual’s weight status in relation to height (weight/height2, with weight in kilograms and height in meters). Based on the WHO current classification, adults with a BMI between 25 and 30 are defined as overweight, and those with a BMI over 30 as obese.
  • Obesity > Overweight and obese population aged 15 or more > Males: The most frequently used measure of overweight and obesity is based on the body mass index (BMI), which is a single number that evaluates an individual’s weight status in relation to height (weight/height2, with weight in kilograms and height in meters). Based on the WHO current classification, adults with a BMI between 25 and 30 are defined as overweight, and those with a BMI over 30 as obese.
  • Infant mortality > Infant mortality: The infant mortality rate is the number of deaths of children under one year of age expressed per 1 000 live births. Neonatal mortality refers to the death of children under 28 days.
  • Mortality > Completeness of infant death reporting > % of reported infant deaths to estimated infant deaths: Completeness of infant death reporting is the number of infant deaths reported by national statistics authorities to the United Nations Statistics Division's Demography Yearbook divided by the number of infant deaths estimated by the United Nations Population Division.
  • Life expectancy > Life expectancy at birth > Total: Life expectancy measures how long on average people would live based on a given set of age-specific death rates. However, the actual age-specific death rates of any particular birth cohort cannot be known in advance. If age-specific death rates are falling (as has been the case over the past decades in OECD countries), actual life spans will be higher than life expectancy calculated with current death rates.
  • Obesity > Obese population aged 15 or more > Females: The most frequently used measure of overweight and obesity is based on the body mass index (BMI), which is a single number that evaluates an individual’s weight status in relation to height (weight/height2, with weight in kilograms and height in meters). Based on the WHO current classification, adults with a BMI between 25 and 30 are defined as overweight, and those with a BMI over 30 as obese.
  • Obesity > Overweight population aged 15 or more: The most frequently used measure of overweight and obesity is based on the body mass index (BMI), which is a single number that evaluates an individual’s weight status in relation to height (weight/height2, with weight in kilograms and height in meters). Based on the WHO current classification, adults with a BMI between 25 and 30 are defined as overweight, and those with a BMI over 30 as obese.
  • Mortality > Completeness of total death reporting > % of reported total deaths to estimated total deaths: Completeness of total death reporting is the number of total deaths reported by national statistics authorities to the United Nations Statistics Division's Demography Yearbook divided by the number of total deaths estimated by the United Nations Population Division.
  • Reproductive health > Lifetime risk of maternal death > 1 in > Rate varies by country: Life time risk of maternal death is the probability that a 15-year-old female will die eventually from a maternal cause assuming that current levels of fertility and mortality (including maternal mortality) do not change in the future, taking into account competing causes of death. "
  • Cause of death, by communicable diseases and maternal, prenatal and nutrition conditions > % of total: Cause of death, by communicable diseases and maternal, prenatal and nutrition conditions (% of total). Cause of death refers to the share of all deaths for all ages by underlying causes. Communicable diseases and maternal, prenatal and nutrition conditions include infectious and parasitic diseases, respiratory infections, and nutritional deficiencies such as underweight and stunting.
  • Cause of death, by injury > % of total: Cause of death, by injury (% of total). Cause of death refers to the share of all deaths for all ages by underlying causes. Injuries include unintentional and intentional injuries.
  • Diseases > Cause of death, by non-communicable diseases > % of total: Cause of death, by non-communicable diseases (% of total). Cause of death refers to the share of all deaths for all ages by underlying causes. Non-communicable diseases include cancer, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, digestive diseases, skin diseases, musculoskeletal diseases, and congenital anomalies.
  • Teenage pregnancy per million: Number of births to women aged below twenty. Data for 1998. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Tobacco > Total adult smokers per million: Total adults smoking. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Red Cross donations per capita: Amounts of the contributions to the International Committee of the Red Cross by the Council of Europe member states and states with an observer status in the PACE in the period from 1996 to 2000 (in Swiss Francs). Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Transplants > Liver per million: The number of liver transplants in the nation in 2002.(If the surveyed year is different, it is given in brackets). Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Transplants > Kidney per million: The number of kidney transplants in the nation in 2002. (If the surveyed year is different, it is given in brackets). Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Transplants > Heart per million: The number of heart transplants in the nation in 2002. (If the surveyed year is different, it is given in brackets). Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Duration of hospitalisation per million: Average length of stay in a hospital per patient admitted to acute care (2000). Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Expenditure per capita > Current US$: Total health expenditure is the sum of public and private health expenditures as a ratio of total population. It covers the provision of health services (preventive and curative), family planning activities, nutrition activities, and emergency aid designated for health but does not include provision of water and sanitation. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Hospital beds > Per 1,000 people: Hospital beds include inpatient beds available in public, private, general, and specialized hospitals and rehabilitation centers. In most cases beds for both acute and chronic care are included.
  • Diseases > Prevalence of anemia among children > % of children under 5: Prevalence of anemia among children (% of children under 5). Prevalence of anemia, children under age 5, is the percentage of children under age 5 whose hemoglobin level is less than 110 grams per liter at sea level.
  • Diseases > Female adults with HIV > % of population ages 15+ with HIV: Female adults with HIV (% of population ages 15+ with HIV). Prevalence of HIV is the percentage of people who are infected with HIV. Female rate is as a percentage of the total population ages 15+ who are living with HIV.
  • Immunisation > Immunization, DPT > % of children ages 12-23 months: Immunization, DPT (% of children ages 12-23 months). Child immunization measures the percentage of children ages 12-23 months who received vaccinations before 12 months or at any time before the survey. A child is considered adequately immunized against diphtheria, pertussis (or whooping cough), and tetanus (DPT) after receiving three doses of vaccine.
  • Immunisation > Immunization, measles > % of children ages 12-23 months: Immunization, measles (% of children ages 12-23 months). Child immunization measures the percentage of children ages 12-23 months who received vaccinations before 12 months or at any time before the survey. A child is considered adequately immunized against measles after receiving one dose of vaccine.
  • Nurses and midwives > Per 1,000 people: Nurses and midwives (per 1,000 people). Nurses and midwives include professional nurses, professional midwives, auxiliary nurses, auxiliary midwives, enrolled nurses, enrolled midwives and other associated personnel, such as dental nurses and primary care nurses.
  • Diseases > Prevalence of anemia among pregnant women > %: Prevalence of anemia among pregnant women (%). Prevalence of anemia, pregnant women, is the percentage of pregnant women whose hemoglobin level is less than 110 grams per liter at sea level.
  • Tuberculosis case detection rate > %, all forms: Tuberculosis case detection rate (%, all forms). Tuberculosis case detection rate (all forms) is the percentage of newly notified tuberculosis cases (including relapses) to estimated incident cases (case detection, all forms).
  • Diseases > Incidence of tuberculosis > Per 100,000 people: Incidence of tuberculosis (per 100,000 people). Incidence of tuberculosis is the estimated number of new pulmonary, smear positive, and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis cases. Incidence includes patients with HIV.
  • Out-of-pocket health expenditure > % of total expenditure on health: Out-of-pocket health expenditure (% of total expenditure on health). Out of pocket expenditure is any direct outlay by households, including gratuities and in-kind payments, to health practitioners and suppliers of pharmaceuticals, therapeutic appliances, and other goods and services whose primary intent is to contribute to the restoration or enhancement of the health status of individuals or population groups. It is a part of private health expenditure.
  • Health expenditure per capita > Current US$: Health expenditure per capita (current US$). Total health expenditure is the sum of public and private health expenditures as a ratio of total population. It covers the provision of health services (preventive and curative), family planning activities, nutrition activities, and emergency aid designated for health but does not include provision of water and sanitation. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Health expenditure, private > % of GDP: Health expenditure, private (% of GDP). Private health expenditure includes direct household (out-of-pocket) spending, private insurance, charitable donations, and direct service payments by private corporations.
  • Health expenditure, public > % of total health expenditure: Health expenditure, public (% of total health expenditure). Public health expenditure consists of recurrent and capital spending from government (central and local) budgets, external borrowings and grants (including donations from international agencies and nongovernmental organizations), and social (or compulsory) health insurance funds. Total health expenditure is the sum of public and private health expenditure. It covers the provision of health services (preventive and curative), family planning activities, nutrition activities, and emergency aid designated for health but does not include provision of water and sanitation.
  • Health expenditure, public > % of government expenditure: Health expenditure, public (% of government expenditure). Public health expenditure consists of recurrent and capital spending from government (central and local) budgets, external borrowings and grants (including donations from international agencies and nongovernmental organizations), and social (or compulsory) health insurance funds.
  • Health expenditure, public > % of GDP: Health expenditure, public (% of GDP). Public health expenditure consists of recurrent and capital spending from government (central and local) budgets, external borrowings and grants (including donations from international agencies and nongovernmental organizations), and social (or compulsory) health insurance funds.
  • Health expenditure, total > % of GDP: Health expenditure, total (% of GDP). Total health expenditure is the sum of public and private health expenditure. It covers the provision of health services (preventive and curative), family planning activities, nutrition activities, and emergency aid designated for health but does not include provision of water and sanitation.
  • Life expectancy at birth, female > Years: Life expectancy at birth, female (years). Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life.
  • Life expectancy at birth, total > Years: Life expectancy at birth, total (years). Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life.
  • Life expectancy at birth, male > Years: Life expectancy at birth, male (years). Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life.
  • Probability of not reaching 60: Probability at birth of not reaching the age of 40.
  • Diseases > Diabetes > Prevalence > % of population ages 20 to 79: Diabetes prevalence (% of population ages 20 to 79). Diabetes prevalence refers to the percentage of people ages 20-79 who have type 1 or type 2 diabetes.
  • Fertility rate > Total > Births per woman: Total fertility rate represents the number of children that would be born to a woman if she were to live to the end of her childbearing years and bear children in accordance with current age-specific fertility rates.
  • Incidence of tuberculosis > Per 100,000 people: Incidence of tuberculosis is the estimated number of new pulmonary, smear positive, and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis cases.
  • Growth in health expenditure > Per annum: Annual real yearly growth in health care expenditure; average for years 1990-2000. 1990-98 for Sweden and Turkey, 1990-99 for Luxembourg and Poland, 1991-2000 for Hungary, 1992-2000 for Germany.
  • HIV AIDS > People living with HIV AIDS per 1000: An estimate of all people (adults and children) alive at yearend with HIV infection, whether or not they have developed symptoms of AIDS. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Obesity > Overweight population aged 15 or more > Males: The most frequently used measure of overweight and obesity is based on the body mass index (BMI), which is a single number that evaluates an individual’s weight status in relation to height (weight/height2, with weight in kilograms and height in meters). Based on the WHO current classification, adults with a BMI between 25 and 30 are defined as overweight, and those with a BMI over 30 as obese.
  • Circulatory disease deaths per million: Standardised death rates per 100 000 population (1999). Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Transplants > Lung per million: The number of lung transplants in the nation in 2002. (If the surveyed year is different, it is given in brackets). Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Transplants > Total per million: The total of our statistics for kidney, liver, pancreas, kidney-pancreas, heart, lung, heart-lung and intestine transplants. Note that, in some cases, the figures for each individual organ type were taken in different years (either 2000, 2001, or 2002). Thus these totals are suggestive but not conclusive. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Quality of health care system > Friendliness and courtesy of staff: Friendliness and courtesy of the staff. Based on 0-50 contributions for Albania, Argentina, Austria and 69 more countries and 50-100 contributions for Australia, Brazil, Germany and 7 more countries and over 100 contributions for Canada, India, United Kingdom and 1 more country. The surveys were conducted by numbeo.com from October, 2010 to February, 2014. See this sample survey for the United States, respondents were asked "Friendliness and courtesy of the staff?". The higher the value, the more survey respondents believe it is high in their country.
  • Quality of health care system > Modern equipment: Equipment for modern diagnosis and treatment. Based on 0-50 contributions for Albania, Argentina, Austria and 69 more countries and 50-100 contributions for Australia, Brazil, Germany and 7 more countries and over 100 contributions for Canada, India, United Kingdom and 1 more country. The surveys were conducted by numbeo.com from October, 2010 to February, 2014. See this sample survey for the United States, respondents were asked "Does hospitals have equipment for modern diagnosis and treatment?". The higher the value, the more survey respondents believe it is high in their country.
  • Quality of health care system > Speed in delivering examinations and reports: Speed in completing examination and reports. Based on 0-50 contributions for Albania, Argentina, Austria and 69 more countries and 50-100 contributions for Australia, Brazil, Germany and 7 more countries and over 100 contributions for Canada, India, United Kingdom and 1 more country. The surveys were conducted by numbeo.com from October, 2010 to February, 2014. See this sample survey for the United States, respondents were asked "Speed in completing examination and reports?". The higher the value, the more survey respondents believe it is high in their country.
  • Quality of health care system > Health care system index: Health Care Index is an estimation of the overall quality of the health care system, health care professionals, equipment, staff, doctors, cost, etc.
  • Life expectancy > Male healthy years: Number of years of life while 'healthy', as defined by the OECD. Estimates for 2001. See the source for details.
  • Total expenditure as % of GDP: Total expenditure on health in the country given as a percentage of its GDP (Data for 2001).
  • Quality of health care system > Convenient location: Convenience of location for you. Based on 0-50 contributions for Albania, Argentina, Austria and 69 more countries and 50-100 contributions for Australia, Brazil, Germany and 7 more countries and over 100 contributions for Canada, India, United Kingdom and 1 more country. The surveys were conducted by numbeo.com from October, 2010 to February, 2014. See this sample survey for the United States, respondents were asked "Convenience of location for you". The higher the value, the more survey respondents believe it is high in their country.
  • Quality of health care system > Cost: Cost to you. Based on 0-50 contributions for Albania, Argentina, Austria and 69 more countries and 50-100 contributions for Australia, Brazil, Germany and 7 more countries and over 100 contributions for Canada, India, United Kingdom and 1 more country. The surveys were conducted by numbeo.com from October, 2010 to February, 2014. See this sample survey for the United States, respondents were asked "Cost to you". The higher the value, the more survey respondents believe it is high in their country.
  • Quality of health care system > Short waiting times: Responsiveness (waitings) in medical institutions. Based on 0-50 contributions for Albania, Argentina, Austria and 69 more countries and 50-100 contributions for Australia, Brazil, Germany and 7 more countries and over 100 contributions for Canada, India, United Kingdom and 1 more country. The surveys were conducted by numbeo.com from October, 2010 to February, 2014. See this sample survey for the United States, respondents were asked "How satisfied are you with the responsiveness (waitings) in medical institutions?". The higher the value, the more survey respondents believe it is high in their country.
  • Quality of health care system > Accuracy and completeness in filling out reports: Accuracy and completeness in filling out reports. Based on 0-50 contributions for Albania, Argentina, Austria and 69 more countries and 50-100 contributions for Australia, Brazil, Germany and 7 more countries and over 100 contributions for Canada, India, United Kingdom and 1 more country. The surveys were conducted by numbeo.com from October, 2010 to February, 2014. See this sample survey for the United States, respondents were asked "How satisfied you with the accuracy and completeness in filling out reports?". The higher the value, the more survey respondents believe it is high in their country.
  • Quality of health care system > Skill and competence of medical staff: Skill and competency of medical staff. Based on 0-50 contributions for Albania, Argentina, Austria and 69 more countries and 50-100 contributions for Australia, Brazil, Germany and 7 more countries and over 100 contributions for Canada, India, United Kingdom and 1 more country. The surveys were conducted by numbeo.com from October, 2010 to February, 2014. See this sample survey for the United States, respondents were asked "How satisfied are you with the skill and competency of the local medical staff?". The higher the value, the more survey respondents believe it is high in their country.
  • Life expectancy > Men: Life expectancy for men.
  • Physicians > Per 1,000 people: Physicians are defined as graduates of any facility or school of medicine who are working in the country in any medical field (practice, teaching, research).
  • Life expectancy > Women: Life expectancy for women.
  • Birth rate > Crude > Per 1,000 people: Crude birth rate indicates the number of live births occurring during the year, per 1,000 population estimated at midyear. Subtracting the crude death rate from the crude birth rate provides the rate of natural increase, which is equal to the population growth rate in the absence of migration.
  • Smoking prevalence > Males > % of adults: Prevalence of smoking, male is the percentage of men who smoke cigarettes. The age range varies among countries but in most is 18 and older or 15 and older.
  • Life expectancy at birth > Total > Years: Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life.
  • Smoking prevalence > Females > % of adults: Prevalence of smoking, female is the percentage of women who smoke cigarettes. The age range varies among countries but in most is 18 and older or 15 and older.
  • Prevalence of HIV > Total > % of population ages 15-49: Prevalence of HIV refers to the percentage of people ages 15-49 who are infected with HIV.
  • Contraceptive prevalence > % of women ages 15-49: Contraceptive prevalence rate is the percentage of women who are practicing, or whose sexual partners are practicing, any form of contraception. It is usually measured for married women ages 15-49 only.
  • Expenditure > Total > % of GDP: Total health expenditure is the sum of public and private health expenditure. It covers the provision of health services (preventive and curative), family planning activities, nutrition activities, and emergency aid designated for health but does not include provision of water and sanitation.
  • Expenditure > Private > % of GDP: Private health expenditure includes direct household (out-of-pocket) spending, private insurance, charitable donations, and direct service payments by private corporations.
  • Life expectancy at birth > Male > Years: Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life.
  • Prevalence of undernourishment > % of population: Population below minimum level of dietary energy consumption (also referred to as prevalence of undernourishment) shows the percentage of the population whose food intake is insufficient to meet dietary energy requirements continuously. Data showing as 2.5 signifies a prevalence of undernourishment below 2.5%.
  • Improved water source > % of population with access: Access to an improved water source refers to the percentage of the population with reasonable access to an adequate amount of water from an improved source, such as a household connection, public standpipe, borehole, protected well or spring, and rainwater collection. Unimproved sources include vendors, tanker trucks, and unprotected wells and springs. Reasonable access is defined as the availability of at least 20 liters a person a day from a source within one kilometer of the dwelling.
  • Expenditure > Public > % of GDP: Public health expenditure consists of recurrent and capital spending from government (central and local) budgets, external borrowings and grants (including donations from international agencies and nongovernmental organizations), and social (or compulsory) health insurance funds.
  • Adolescent fertility rate > Births per 1,000 women ages 15-19: Adolescent fertility rate is the number of births per 1,000 women ages 15-19.
  • Out-of-pocket health expenditure > % of private expenditure on health: Out of pocket expenditure is any direct outlay by households, including gratuities and in-kind payments, to health practitioners and suppliers of pharmaceuticals, therapeutic appliances, and other goods and services whose primary intent is to contribute to the restoration or enhancement of the health status of individuals or population groups. It is a part of private health expenditure.
  • Life expectancy at birth > Female > Years: Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life.
  • Improved sanitation facilities > % of population with access: Access to improved sanitation facilities refers to the percentage of the population with at least adequate access to excreta disposal facilities that can effectively prevent human, animal, and insect contact with excreta. Improved facilities range from simple but protected pit latrines to flush toilets with a sewerage connection. To be effective, facilities must be correctly constructed and properly maintained.
  • Improved sanitation facilities > Rural > % of rural population with access: Access to improved sanitation facilities refers to the percentage of the population with at least adequate access to excreta disposal facilities that can effectively prevent human, animal, and insect contact with excreta. Improved facilities range from simple but protected pit latrines to flush toilets with a sewerage connection. To be effective, facilities must be correctly constructed and properly maintained.
  • Female adults with HIV > % of population ages 15+ with HIV: Female adults with HIV refers to the percentage of women of those ages 15-49 infected with HIV.
  • Improved water source > Urban > % of urban population with access: Access to an improved water source refers to the percentage of the population with reasonable access to an adequate amount of water from an improved source, such as a household connection, public standpipe, borehole, protected well or spring, and rainwater collection. Unimproved sources include vendors, tanker trucks, and unprotected wells and springs. Reasonable access is defined as the availability of at least 20 liters a person a day from a source within one kilometer of the dwelling.
  • Improved sanitation facilities > Urban > % of urban population with access: Access to improved sanitation facilities refers to the percentage of the population with at least adequate access to excreta disposal facilities that can effectively prevent human, animal, and insect contact with excreta. Improved facilities range from simple but protected pit latrines to flush toilets with a sewerage connection. To be effective, facilities must be correctly constructed and properly maintained.
  • Improved water source > Rural > % of rural population with access: Access to an improved water source refers to the percentage of the population with reasonable access to an adequate amount of water from an improved source, such as a household connection, public standpipe, borehole, protected well or spring, and rainwater collection. Unimproved sources include vendors, tanker trucks, and unprotected wells and springs. Reasonable access is defined as the availability of at least 20 liters a person a day from a source within one kilometer of the dwelling.
  • Immunization > DPT > % of children ages 12-23 months: Child immunization measures the percentage of children ages 12-23 months who received vaccinations before 12 months or at any time before the survey. A child is considered adequately immunized against diphtheria, pertussis (or whooping cough), and tetanus (DPT) after receiving three doses of vaccine.
  • HIV AIDS > Adult prevalence rate: An estimate of the percentage of adults (aged 15-49) living with HIV/AIDS. The adult prevalence rate is calculated by dividing the estimated number of adults living with HIV/AIDS at yearend by the total adult population at yearend.
  • HIV AIDS > People living with HIV AIDS: An estimate of all people (adults and children) alive at yearend with HIV infection, whether or not they have developed symptoms of AIDS.
  • HIV AIDS > People living with HIV AIDS > Per capita: An estimate of all people (adults and children) alive at yearend with HIV infection, whether or not they have developed symptoms of AIDS. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Immunization > Measles > % of children ages 12-23 months: Child immunization measures the percentage of children ages 12-23 months who received vaccinations before 12 months or at any time before the survey. A child is considered adequately immunized against measles after receiving one dose of vaccine.
  • Life expectancy at birth > Female: The average number of years to be lived by a females in this nation born in the same year, if mortality at each age remains constant in the future. Life expectancy at birth is also a measure of overall quality of life in a country and summarizes the mortality at all ages. It can also be thought of as indicating the potential return on investment in human capital and is necessary for the calculation of various actuarial measures.
  • Life expectancy at birth > Total population: The average number of years to be lived by a group of people born in the same year, if mortality at each age remains constant in the future. Life expectancy at birth is also a measure of overall quality of life in a country and summarizes the mortality at all ages. It can also be thought of as indicating the potential return on investment in human capital and is necessary for the calculation of various actuarial measures.
  • Life expectancy at birth > Male: The average number of years to be lived by amen in this nation born in the same year, if mortality at each age remains constant in the future. The entry includes total population as well as the male and female components. Life expectancy at birth is also a measure of overall quality of life in a country and summarizes the mortality at all ages. It can also be thought of as indicating the potential return on investment in human capital and is necessary for the calculation of various actuarial measures.
  • Life expectancy at birth > Years > Total population: Life expectancy at birth (years) 2003 - Total population
  • Health care funding > Total per capita: Public and private funding of health care expenditure, in US $ PPP per capita. Data for 2000.
  • % immunized 1-year-old children > Measles: Health - % immunized 2002 1-year-old children - Measles
  • % immunized 1-year-old children > Polio3: Health - % immunized 2002 1-year-old children - Polio3
  • Death rates > Children under 5: Under-five mortality rate is the probability per 1,000 that a newborn baby will die before reaching age five, if subject to current age-specific mortality rates."
  • Disease prevention > Immunisation against tetanus > % of children ages 12-23 months: Child immunisation measures the percentage of children ages 12-23 months who received vaccinations before 12 months or at any time before the survey. A child is considered adequately immunized against diphtheria, pertussis (or whooping cough), and tetanus (DPT) after receiving three doses of vaccine."
  • Disease prevention > Immunisation > Measles > % of children ages 12-23 months: Child immunisation measures the percentage of children ages 12-23 months who received vaccinations before 12 months or at any time before the survey. A child is considered adequately immunized against measles after receiving one dose of vaccine.
  • Disease prevention > Improved sanitation facilities > % of population with access: Access to improved sanitation facilities refers to the percentage of the population with at least adequate access to excreta disposal facilities that can effectively prevent human, animal, and insect contact with excreta. Improved facilities range from simple but protected pit latrines to flush toilets with a sewerage connection. To be effective, facilities must be correctly constructed and properly maintained."
  • Disease prevention > Improved sanitation facilities > Rural > % of rural population with access: Access to improved sanitation facilities refers to the percentage of the population with at least adequate access to excreta disposal facilities that can effectively prevent human, animal, and insect contact with excreta. Improved facilities range from simple but protected pit latrines to flush toilets with a sewerage connection. To be effective, facilities must be correctly constructed and properly maintained."
  • Disease prevention > Improved sanitation facilities > Urban > % of urban population with access: Access to improved sanitation facilities refers to the percentage of the population with at least adequate access to excreta disposal facilities that can effectively prevent human, animal, and insect contact with excreta. Improved facilities range from simple but protected pit latrines to flush toilets with a sewerage connection. To be effective, facilities must be correctly constructed and properly maintained."
  • Disease prevention > Improved water source > % of population with access: Access to an improved water source refers to the percentage of the population with reasonable access to an adequate amount of water from an improved source, such as a household connection, public standpipe, borehole, protected well or spring, and rainwater collection. Unimproved sources include vendors, tanker trucks, and unprotected wells and springs. Reasonable access is defined as the availability of at least 20 liters a person a day from a source within one kilometer of the dwelling."
  • Disease prevention > Improved water source > Urban > % of urban population with access: Access to an improved water source refers to the percentage of the population with reasonable access to an adequate amount of water from an improved source, such as a household connection, public standpipe, borehole, protected well or spring, and rainwater collection. Unimproved sources include vendors, tanker trucks, and unprotected wells and springs. Reasonable access is defined as the availability of at least 20 liters a person a day from a source within one kilometer of the dwelling."
  • Disease prevention > Tuberculosis case detection rate > All forms: Tuberculosis case detection rate (all forms) is the percentage of newly notified tuberculosis cases (including relapses) to estimated incident cases (case detection, all forms)."
  • Health services > External resources for health > % of total expenditure on health: External resources for health are funds or services in kind that are provided by entities not part of the country in question. The resources may come from international organisations, other countries through bilateral arrangements, or foreign nongovernmental organisations. These resources are part of total health expenditure."
  • Health services > Health expenditure per capita > PPP > Constant 2005 international $: Total health expenditure is the sum of public and private health expenditures as a ratio of total population. It covers the provision of health services (preventive and curative), family planning activities, nutrition activities, and emergency aid designated for health but does not include provision of water and sanitation. Data are in international dollars converted using 2005 purchasing power parity (PPP) rates."
  • Health services > Hospital beds > Per 1,000 people: Hospital beds include inpatient beds available in public, private, general, and specialized hospitals and rehabilitation centers. In most cases beds for both acute and chronic care are included."
  • Health services > Nurses and midwives > Per 1,000 people: Nurses and midwives include professional nurses, professional midwives, auxiliary nurses, auxiliary midwives, enrolled nurses, enrolled midwives and other associated personnel, such as dental nurses and primary care nurses."
  • Health services > Out-of-pocket health expenditure > % of private expenditure on health: Out of pocket expenditure is any direct outlay by households, including gratuities and in-kind payments, to health practitioners and suppliers of pharmaceuticals, therapeutic appliances, and other goods and services whose primary intent is to contribute to the restoration or enhancement of the health status of individuals or population groups. It is a part of private health expenditure."
STAT Canada Switzerland HISTORY
Access to sanitation 100%
Ranked 21st. The same as Switzerland
100%
Ranked 3rd.
Contraception 75%
Ranked 11th.
82%
Ranked 3rd. 9% more than Canada
Daily smokers 17%
Ranked 30th.
26.8%
Ranked 15th. 58% more than Canada
Dependency ratio per 100 45
Ranked 153th.
48
Ranked 139th. 7% more than Canada
Drug access 95%
Ranked 53th. The same as Switzerland
95%
Ranked 8th.
Infant mortality rate > Total 4.92 deaths/1,000 live births
Ranked 178th. 21% more than Switzerland
4.08 deaths/1,000 live births
Ranked 195th.

Motor vehicle deaths 9.6 deaths per 100,000 peopl
Ranked 10th. 12% more than Switzerland
8.6 deaths per 100,000 peopl
Ranked 14th.
Nurses 9.9 per 1,000 people
Ranked 7th.
10.7 per 1,000 people
Ranked 5th. 8% more than Canada
Obesity 14.3%
Ranked 11th. 86% more than Switzerland
7.7%
Ranked 27th.
Red Cross donations 22.42 million
Ranked 6th.
99.6 million
Ranked 2nd. 4 times more than Canada
Spending > Per person 1,939
Ranked 14th.
3,857
Ranked 2nd. 99% more than Canada
Teen birth rate 27
Ranked 19th. 5 times more than Switzerland
5
Ranked 39th.
Teenage pregnancy 19,920 births
Ranked 4th. 18 times more than Switzerland
1,092 births
Ranked 24th.
Tobacco > Total adult smokers 25%
Ranked 71st.
33.5%
Ranked 41st. 34% more than Canada
Transplants > Kidney 983 kidney transplants
Ranked 5th. 4 times more than Switzerland
242 kidney transplants
Ranked 18th.
Life expectancy > Healthy years 69.9 years
Ranked 18th.
72.8 years
Ranked 2nd. 4% more than Canada
Transplants > Heart 111 heart transplants
Ranked 4th. 8 times more than Switzerland
14 heart transplants
Ranked 21st.
Suicide rate > Gender ratio 4 per 100,000 people
Ranked 26th. 48% more than Switzerland
2.7 per 100,000 people
Ranked 49th.
Transplants > Liver 329 liver transplants
Ranked 4th. 4 times more than Switzerland
84 liver transplants
Ranked 16th.
Death rates > Men 92.03
Ranked 160th. 17% more than Switzerland
78.37
Ranked 156th.

SARS total cases 251
Ranked 4th. 251 times more than Switzerland
1
Ranked 25th.
Births > Low birth weight 5.6%
Ranked 21st.
6.3%
Ranked 13th. 13% more than Canada
Acute care beds 3.2 per 1,000 people
Ranked 15th.
4 per 1,000 people
Ranked 10th. 25% more than Canada
Suicide rate > Young males 24.7 per 100,000 people
Ranked 12th.
25 per 100,000 people
Ranked 11th. 1% more than Canada
Practising physicians 2.1 per 1,000 people
Ranked 21st.
3.6 per 1,000 people
Ranked 5th. 71% more than Canada
Total fertility rate 1.5
Ranked 150th. 7% more than Switzerland
1.4
Ranked 152nd.
Duration of hospitalisation 7.2 days
Ranked 5th.
9.3 days
Ranked 1st. 29% more than Canada
Child maltreatment deaths 0.7 per 100,000 children
Ranked 7th.
0.8 per 100,000 children
Ranked 6th. 14% more than Canada
Intestinal diseases death rate 0.3%
Ranked 130th.
2.97%
Ranked 99th. 10 times more than Canada
Transplants > Lung 112 lung transplants
Ranked 2nd. 4 times more than Switzerland
26 lung transplants
Ranked 8th.
Infant mortality rate > Female 4.56 deaths/1,000 live births
Ranked 177th. 27% more than Switzerland
3.6 deaths/1,000 live births
Ranked 194th.

Circulatory disease deaths 219 deaths per 100,000 peopl
Ranked 14th. About the same as Switzerland
218 deaths per 100,000 peopl
Ranked 15th.
Infant mortality rate > Male 5.26 deaths/1,000 live births
Ranked 181st. 16% more than Switzerland
4.53 deaths/1,000 live births
Ranked 191st.

Suicide rate > Young females 6 per 100,000 people
Ranked 12th. 25% more than Switzerland
4.8 per 100,000 people
Ranked 21st.
Life expectancy > Male 78.76
Ranked 9th.
79.83
Ranked 3rd. 1% more than Canada

Life expectancy > Female 83.28
Ranked 11th.
84.61
Ranked 5th. 2% more than Canada

SARS fatalities 43
Ranked 3rd.
0.0
Ranked 21st.
Death rates > Infants 5.3
Ranked 147th. 33% more than Switzerland
4
Ranked 157th.

Spending > Public 6.6% (1999) 7.6%
Death rates > Women 55.87
Ranked 158th. 23% more than Switzerland
45.6
Ranked 156th.

Transplants > Total 1,574 transplants
Ranked 3rd. 4 times more than Switzerland
379 transplants
Ranked 16th.
Child injury death index 9.7
Ranked 9th. 1% more than Switzerland
9.6
Ranked 10th.
Spending > Private 2.7%
Ranked 49th.
2.8%
Ranked 43th. 4% more than Canada
Smoking rate > Women 18
Ranked 51st.
23
Ranked 35th. 28% more than Canada
SARS median age range 49
Ranked 9th. 40% more than Switzerland
35
Ranked 19th.
Transplants > Kidney and pancreas 21 kidney-pancreas transpla
Ranked 5th. 62% more than Switzerland
13 kidney-pancreas transpla
Ranked 10th.
Daily smokers > 1990 28.2%
Ranked 18th. The same as Switzerland
28.2%
Ranked 19th.
Health services > Outpatient visits per capita 6.3
Ranked 22nd.
11
Ranked 5th. 75% more than Canada

Health services > Physicians > Per 1,000 people 1.91
Ranked 42nd.
3.97
Ranked 6th. 2 times more than Canada

Health spending > % of GDP 10.12%
Ranked 16th.
10.8%
Ranked 8th. 7% more than Canada

Health spending per capita 4,409.12
Ranked 12th.
6,107.77
Ranked 5th. 39% more than Canada

Nutrition > Depth of hunger > Kilocalories per person per day 20
Ranked 164th.
120
Ranked 132nd. 6 times more than Canada

Nutrition > Low-birthweight babies > % of births 5.8%
Ranked 59th.
6.3%
Ranked 32nd. 9% more than Canada

Nutrition > Prevalence of undernourishment > % of population 5%
Ranked 168th. The same as Switzerland
5%
Ranked 100th.

Private health spending > % of GDP 3.04%
Ranked 52nd.
4.4%
Ranked 21st. 45% more than Canada

Public health spending > % of GDP 7.08%
Ranked 19th. 11% more than Switzerland
6.4%
Ranked 27th.

Public health spending > % of government spending 18.13%
Ranked 12th.
19.8%
Ranked 4th. 9% more than Canada

Public health spending > % of total health spending 69.98%
Ranked 68th. 18% more than Switzerland
59.27%
Ranked 94th.

Reproductive health > Births attended by skilled health staff > % of total 100%
Ranked 5th. The same as Switzerland
100%
Ranked 3rd.
Reproductive health > Maternal mortality ratio > Modeled estimate > Per 100,000 live births 12
Ranked 134th. 20% more than Switzerland
10
Ranked 135th.

Risk factors > Female adults with HIV > % of population ages 15+ with HIV 27.4%
Ranked 104th.
36.8%
Ranked 60th. 34% more than Canada

Risk factors > Prevalence of HIV > Female > % ages 15-24 0.2%
Ranked 84th.
0.5%
Ranked 56th. 3 times more than Canada
Risk factors > Incidence of tuberculosis > Per 100,000 people 5.02
Ranked 177th. 3% more than Switzerland
4.86
Ranked 178th.

Risk factors > Prevalence of HIV > Male > % ages 15-24 0.4%
Ranked 72nd. The same as Switzerland
0.4%
Ranked 59th.
Risk factors > Prevalence of HIV > Total > % of population ages 15-49 0.4%
Ranked 81st.
0.6%
Ranked 63th. 50% more than Canada

Survival rate > To age 65 > Men 86.4
Ranked 13th.
87.97
Ranked 4th. 2% more than Canada

Survival rate > To age 65 > Women 91.67
Ranked 21st.
93.29
Ranked 6th. 2% more than Canada

Total expenditure on health as % of GDP 9.6%
Ranked 17th.
11.2%
Ranked 4th. 17% more than Canada
Probability of reaching 65 > Male 82.3%
Ranked 9th. About the same as Switzerland
82.2%
Ranked 10th.
Percentage of life lived in ill health > Female 12.6%
Ranked 8th. 24% more than Switzerland
10.2%
Ranked 29th.
Tuberculosis cases > Per 100,000 3
Ranked 162nd.
5
Ranked 146th. 67% more than Canada
Years lived in ill health > Female 10.4 years
Ranked 7th. 24% more than Switzerland
8.4 years
Ranked 29th.
Drinking water availability % 100%
Ranked 27th. The same as Switzerland
100%
Ranked 5th.
Private expenditure on health as % of total expenditure on health 30.1%
Ranked 117th.
42.1%
Ranked 90th. 40% more than Canada
Years lived in ill health > Male 8.4 years
Ranked 5th. 35% more than Switzerland
6.2 years
Ranked 27th.
Respiratory disease child death rate 0.62 1.93 (est)
Health care funding > Private per capita $709 per capita
Ranked 4th.
$1,429 per capita
Ranked 2nd. 2 times more than Canada
Life expectancy > Date of information 2006 est. 2006 est.
Public spending as % of total 69.9%
Ranked 20th. 21% more than Switzerland
57.9%
Ranked 22nd.
Per capita total expenditure on health in international dollars 2,931
Ranked 7th.
3,446
Ranked 3rd. 18% more than Canada
Per capita government expenditure on health in international dollars 2,048
Ranked 11th. 3% more than Switzerland
1,995
Ranked 12th.
% of population using adequate sanitation facilities > Total 100
Ranked 27th. The same as Switzerland
100
Ranked 4th.
Health care funding > Public per capita $1,826 per capita
Ranked 6th. 2% more than Switzerland
$1,793 per capita
Ranked 7th.
Probability of dying before 5 > Females 5 per 1,000 people
Ranked 182nd.
6 per 1,000 people
Ranked 161st. 20% more than Canada
Life expectancy at birth > Years > Males 78
Ranked 12th. The same as Switzerland
78
Ranked 3rd.
Out-of-pocket expenditure as % of private health expenditure 50.3%
Ranked 166th.
74.8%
Ranked 141st. 49% more than Canada
Transplants > Kidney and pancreas per million 0.67 kidney-pancreas transpla
Ranked 11th.
1.78 kidney-pancreas transpla
Ranked 4th. 3 times more than Canada
Life expectancy > Female healthy years 71.6 years
Ranked 16th.
74.4 years
Ranked 2nd. 4% more than Canada
Healthy life expectancy at birth > Years > Total population 72
Ranked 13th.
73.2
Ranked 4th. 2% more than Canada
Percentage of life lived in ill health > Males 11%
Ranked 8th. 38% more than Switzerland
8%
Ranked 28th.
Probability of reaching 65 > Female 89.3%
Ranked 18th.
90.5%
Ranked 6th. 1% more than Canada
% immunized 1-year-old children > DPT3 97
Ranked 50th. 2% more than Switzerland
95
Ranked 65th.
Healthy life expectancy at birth > Years > Females 74
Ranked 12th.
75.3
Ranked 3rd. 2% more than Canada
% of population using improved drinking water sources > Total 100
Ranked 30th. The same as Switzerland
100
Ranked 5th.
Life expectancy at birth > Years > Females 82
Ranked 21st.
83
Ranked 7th. 1% more than Canada
Healthy life expectancy at birth > Years > Males 70.1
Ranked 11th.
71.1
Ranked 4th. 1% more than Canada
Prepaid plans as % of private expenditure on health 42.1%
Ranked 11th. 84% more than Switzerland
22.9%
Ranked 22nd.
External resources for health as % of total expenditure on health 0.0
Ranked 179th.
0.0
Ranked 140th.
% of population using improved drinking water sources > Rural 99
Ranked 30th.
100
Ranked 4th. 1% more than Canada
% of population using adequate sanitation facilities > Rural 99
Ranked 30th.
100
Ranked 4th. 1% more than Canada
% of population using improved drinking water sources > Urban 100
Ranked 42nd. The same as Switzerland
100
Ranked 6th.
% of population using adequate sanitation facilities > Urban 100
Ranked 36th. The same as Switzerland
100
Ranked 6th.
HIV AIDS > Women living with aids 15-49 0.31
Ranked 69th.
0.5
Ranked 58th. 61% more than Canada
SARS fatality ratio % 17%
Ranked 4th.
0.0
Ranked 21st.
SARS female cases % 60%
Ranked 8th.
0.0
Ranked 25th.
HIVAIDS > Adult prevalence rate 15-49 years, 0.3
Ranked 79th.
0.5
Ranked 58th. 67% more than Canada
Obesity > Overweight and obese population aged 15 or more 49.9 37.1
Obesity > Overweight and obese population aged 15 or more > Males 56.3 45.4
Infant mortality > Infant mortality 5.4 Deaths per 1 000 live bir
Ranked 7th. 23% more than Switzerland
4.4 Deaths per 1 000 live bir
Ranked 13th.
Mortality > Completeness of infant death reporting > % of reported infant deaths to estimated infant deaths 111.22%
Ranked 3rd. 11% more than Switzerland
100%
Ranked 2nd.
Life expectancy > Life expectancy at birth > Total 80.4 Number of years
Ranked 10th.
81.7 Number of years
Ranked 2nd. 2% more than Canada
Obesity > Obese population aged 15 or more > Females 19 7.5
Obesity > Overweight population aged 15 or more 31.9 29.4
Influenza > Swine flu cases > April 2009 > 30 19
Ranked 3rd. 19 times more than Switzerland
1
Ranked 9th.
Mortality > Completeness of total death reporting > % of reported total deaths to estimated total deaths 97.61%
Ranked 7th.
98.19%
Ranked 20th. 1% more than Canada
Reproductive health > Lifetime risk of maternal death > 1 in > Rate varies by country 5,600
Ranked 29th.
7,600
Ranked 19th. 36% more than Canada
Influenza > 2009 Flu Pandemic Summary > First Case 27/04/2009 4/30/2009
Cause of death, by communicable diseases and maternal, prenatal and nutrition conditions > % of total 5.26%
Ranked 158th. 30% more than Switzerland
4.04%
Ranked 172nd.
Cause of death, by injury > % of total 5.85%
Ranked 127th.
5.91%
Ranked 123th. 1% more than Canada
Diseases > Cause of death, by non-communicable diseases > % of total 88.89%
Ranked 34th.
90.05%
Ranked 21st. 1% more than Canada
Teenage pregnancy per million 658.56 births
Ranked 9th. 4 times more than Switzerland
153.59 births
Ranked 25th.
Tobacco > Total adult smokers per million 0.774%
Ranked 90th.
4.5%
Ranked 49th. 6 times more than Canada
Red Cross donations per capita 0.729
Ranked 14th.
13.86
Ranked 2nd. 19 times more than Canada
Transplants > Liver per million 10.49 liver transplants
Ranked 8th.
11.53 liver transplants
Ranked 7th. 10% more than Canada
Transplants > Kidney per million 31.34 kidney transplants
Ranked 9th.
33.22 kidney transplants
Ranked 7th. 6% more than Canada
Transplants > Heart per million 3.54 heart transplants
Ranked 7th. 84% more than Switzerland
1.92 heart transplants
Ranked 16th.
Duration of hospitalisation per million 0.234 days
Ranked 12th.
1.29 days
Ranked 3rd. 6 times more than Canada
Expenditure per capita > Current US$ 3,037.6$
Ranked 17th.
5,571.9$
Ranked 3rd. 83% more than Canada

Hospital beds > Per 1,000 people 3.7 per 1,000 people
Ranked 29th.
6 per 1,000 people
Ranked 15th. 62% more than Canada

Diseases > Prevalence of anemia among children > % of children under 5 7.61%
Ranked 116th. 21% more than Switzerland
6.31%
Ranked 118th.
Diseases > Female adults with HIV > % of population ages 15+ with HIV 19.7%
Ranked 138th.
30.1%
Ranked 100th. 53% more than Canada

Immunisation > Immunization, DPT > % of children ages 12-23 months 95%
Ranked 93th. The same as Switzerland
95%
Ranked 82nd.

Immunisation > Immunization, measles > % of children ages 12-23 months 98%
Ranked 45th. 7% more than Switzerland
92%
Ranked 106th.

Nurses and midwives > Per 1,000 people 10.05
Ranked 8th.
17.48
Ranked 3rd. 74% more than Canada

Diseases > Prevalence of anemia among pregnant women > % 11.51%
Ranked 125th. 19% more than Switzerland
9.7%
Ranked 11th.
Tuberculosis case detection rate > %, all forms 100%
Ranked 9th. 15% more than Switzerland
87%
Ranked 34th.

Diseases > Incidence of tuberculosis > Per 100,000 people 4.6
Ranked 191st.
6
Ranked 184th. 30% more than Canada

Out-of-pocket health expenditure > % of total expenditure on health 14.38%
Ranked 153th.
25%
Ranked 111th. 74% more than Canada

Health expenditure per capita > Current US$ $5,629.73
Ranked 9th.
$9,120.81
Ranked 1st. 62% more than Canada

Health expenditure, private > % of GDP 3.31%
Ranked 51st.
3.76%
Ranked 40th. 14% more than Canada

Health expenditure, public > % of total health expenditure 70.41%
Ranked 62nd. 8% more than Switzerland
65.42%
Ranked 79th.

Health expenditure, public > % of government expenditure 18.34%
Ranked 18th.
21.02%
Ranked 6th. 15% more than Canada

Health expenditure, public > % of GDP 7.87%
Ranked 17th. 11% more than Switzerland
7.11%
Ranked 26th.

Health expenditure, total > % of GDP 11.18%
Ranked 11th. 3% more than Switzerland
10.86%
Ranked 15th.

Life expectancy at birth, female > Years 83.3
Ranked 21st.
85
Ranked 6th. 2% more than Canada

Life expectancy at birth, total > Years 81.07
Ranked 17th.
82.7
Ranked 3rd. 2% more than Canada

Life expectancy at birth, male > Years 78.94
Ranked 17th.
80.5
Ranked 2nd. 2% more than Canada

Probability of not reaching 60 9.5%
Ranked 38th.
9.6%
Ranked 37th. 1% more than Canada
Diseases > Diabetes > Prevalence > % of population ages 20 to 79 8.13%
Ranked 76th. 28% more than Switzerland
6.36%
Ranked 118th.
Fertility rate > Total > Births per woman 1.51 births per woman
Ranked 146th. 6% more than Switzerland
1.42 births per woman
Ranked 149th.

Incidence of tuberculosis > Per 100,000 people 4.72 per 100,000 people
Ranked 191st.
7.28 per 100,000 people
Ranked 178th. 54% more than Canada

Growth in health expenditure > Per annum 1.8%
Ranked 18th.
2.5%
Ranked 14th. 39% more than Canada
HIV AIDS > People living with HIV AIDS per 1000 2.02
Ranked 81st.
2.32
Ranked 76th. 15% more than Canada

Obesity > Overweight population aged 15 or more > Males 39.3 37.5
Circulatory disease deaths per million 7.18 deaths per 100,000 peopl
Ranked 12th.
30.52 deaths per 100,000 peopl
Ranked 7th. 4 times more than Canada
Transplants > Lung per million 3.57 lung transplants
Ranked 4th. The same as Switzerland
3.57 lung transplants
Ranked 5th.
Transplants > Total per million 50.19 transplants
Ranked 6th.
52.03 transplants
Ranked 4th. 4% more than Canada
Quality of health care system > Friendliness and courtesy of staff 70.99
Ranked 18th.
72
Ranked 15th. 1% more than Canada
Quality of health care system > Modern equipment 90.1
Ranked 20th.
92
Ranked 17th. 2% more than Canada
Quality of health care system > Speed in delivering examinations and reports 58.86
Ranked 27th.
74.04
Ranked 7th. 26% more than Canada
Quality of health care system > Health care system index 71.98
Ranked 16th. 5% more than Switzerland
68.32
Ranked 24th.
Life expectancy > Male healthy years 68.2 years
Ranked 18th.
71.1 years
Ranked 2nd. 4% more than Canada
Total expenditure as % of GDP 9.4% of GDP
Ranked 6th.
10.9% of GDP
Ranked 2nd. 16% more than Canada
Quality of health care system > Convenient location 76.4
Ranked 24th.
80.77
Ranked 9th. 6% more than Canada
Quality of health care system > Cost 80.99
Ranked 4th. 2 times more than Switzerland
37.96
Ranked 45th.
Quality of health care system > Short waiting times 41.78
Ranked 35th.
71.15
Ranked 4th. 70% more than Canada
Quality of health care system > Accuracy and completeness in filling out reports 72.94
Ranked 14th.
73
Ranked 13th. The same as Canada
Quality of health care system > Skill and competence of medical staff 74.77
Ranked 15th.
75.96
Ranked 9th. 2% more than Canada
Life expectancy > Men 79 years
Ranked 15th.
80 years
Ranked 3rd. 1% more than Canada
Physicians > Per 1,000 people 2.1 per 1,000 people
Ranked 37th.
3.6 per 1,000 people
Ranked 9th. 71% more than Canada

Life expectancy > Women 83 years
Ranked 28th.
85 years
Ranked 4th. 2% more than Canada
Birth rate > Crude > Per 1,000 people 10.5 per 1,000 people
Ranked 155th. 9% more than Switzerland
9.6 per 1,000 people
Ranked 163th.

Smoking prevalence > Males > % of adults 22%
Ranked 5th.
26.5%
Ranked 14th. 20% more than Canada

Life expectancy at birth > Total > Years 80.18 years
Ranked 11th.
81.24 years
Ranked 3rd. 1% more than Canada

Smoking prevalence > Females > % of adults 17%
Ranked 5th.
23.1%
Ranked 7th. 36% more than Canada

Prevalence of HIV > Total > % of population ages 15-49 0.3%
Ranked 85th.
0.4%
Ranked 79th. 33% more than Canada

Contraceptive prevalence > % of women ages 15-49 75%
Ranked 7th.
82%
Ranked 2nd. 9% more than Canada

Expenditure > Total > % of GDP 9.8%
Ranked 17th.
11.5%
Ranked 6th. 17% more than Canada

Expenditure > Private > % of GDP 2.96%
Ranked 57th.
4.77%
Ranked 10th. 61% more than Canada

Life expectancy at birth > Male > Years 77.8 years
Ranked 9th.
78.7 years
Ranked 3rd. 1% more than Canada

Prevalence of undernourishment > % of population 2.5%
Ranked 171st. The same as Switzerland
2.5%
Ranked 137th.

Improved water source > % of population with access 100%
Ranked 40th. The same as Switzerland
100%
Ranked 7th.

Expenditure > Public > % of GDP 6.84%
Ranked 22nd. 2% more than Switzerland
6.73%
Ranked 23th.

Adolescent fertility rate > Births per 1,000 women ages 15-19 13.23 births
Ranked 153th. 3 times more than Switzerland
4.5 births
Ranked 177th.

Out-of-pocket health expenditure > % of private expenditure on health 49.4%
Ranked 162nd.
76.7%
Ranked 125th. 55% more than Canada

Life expectancy at birth > Female > Years 82.68 years
Ranked 10th.
83.9 years
Ranked 3rd. 1% more than Canada

Improved sanitation facilities > % of population with access 100%
Ranked 27th. The same as Switzerland
100%
Ranked 5th.

Improved sanitation facilities > Rural > % of rural population with access 99%
Ranked 27th.
100%
Ranked 4th. 1% more than Canada

Female adults with HIV > % of population ages 15+ with HIV 16.27%
Ranked 109th.
36.88%
Ranked 58th. 2 times more than Canada

Improved water source > Urban > % of urban population with access 100%
Ranked 57th. The same as Switzerland
100%
Ranked 9th.

Improved sanitation facilities > Urban > % of urban population with access 100%
Ranked 35th. The same as Switzerland
100%
Ranked 6th.

Improved water source > Rural > % of rural population with access 99%
Ranked 40th.
100%
Ranked 6th. 1% more than Canada

Immunization > DPT > % of children ages 12-23 months 94%
Ranked 83th. 1% more than Switzerland
93%
Ranked 85th.

HIV AIDS > Adult prevalence rate 0.3%
Ranked 88th.
0.4%
Ranked 69th. 33% more than Canada

HIV AIDS > People living with HIV AIDS 68,000
Ranked 49th. 4 times more than Switzerland
18,000
Ranked 79th.

HIV AIDS > People living with HIV AIDS > Per capita 1.77 per 1,000 people
Ranked 61st.
1.8 per 1,000 people
Ranked 72nd. 2% more than Canada
Immunization > Measles > % of children ages 12-23 months 94%
Ranked 80th. 15% more than Switzerland
82%
Ranked 131st.

Life expectancy at birth > Female 84.1 years
Ranked 13th. The same as Switzerland
84.05 years
Ranked 14th.

Life expectancy at birth > Total population 81.38 years
Ranked 12th. About the same as Switzerland
81.07 years
Ranked 15th.

Life expectancy at birth > Male 78.81 years
Ranked 12th. 1% more than Switzerland
78.24 years
Ranked 19th.

Life expectancy at birth > Years > Total population 80
Ranked 14th.
81
Ranked 2nd. 1% more than Canada
Health care funding > Total per capita $2,535 per capita
Ranked 5th.
$3,222 per capita
Ranked 2nd. 27% more than Canada
% immunized 1-year-old children > Measles 96
Ranked 52nd. 22% more than Switzerland
79
Ranked 121st.
% immunized 1-year-old children > Polio3 89
Ranked 106th.
94
Ranked 73th. 6% more than Canada
Death rates > Children under 5 6.1
Ranked 150th. 39% more than Switzerland
4.4
Ranked 158th.

Disease prevention > Immunisation against tetanus > % of children ages 12-23 months 80%
Ranked 147th.
95%
Ranked 74th. 19% more than Canada

Disease prevention > Immunisation > Measles > % of children ages 12-23 months 93%
Ranked 90th. 3% more than Switzerland
90%
Ranked 105th.

Disease prevention > Improved sanitation facilities > % of population with access 100%
Ranked 36th. The same as Switzerland
100%
Ranked 7th.

Disease prevention > Improved sanitation facilities > Rural > % of rural population with access 99%
Ranked 34th.
100%
Ranked 5th. 1% more than Canada

Disease prevention > Improved sanitation facilities > Urban > % of urban population with access 100%
Ranked 41st. The same as Switzerland
100%
Ranked 7th.

Disease prevention > Improved water source > % of population with access 100%
Ranked 43th. The same as Switzerland
100%
Ranked 7th.

Disease prevention > Improved water source > Urban > % of urban population with access 100%
Ranked 54th. The same as Switzerland
100%
Ranked 8th.

Disease prevention > Tuberculosis case detection rate > All forms 86.96%
Ranked 76th. The same as Switzerland
86.96%
Ranked 41st.

Health services > External resources for health > % of total expenditure on health 0.0
Ranked 181st.
0.0
Ranked 138th.

Health services > Health expenditure per capita > PPP > Constant 2005 international $ $3,898.81
Ranked 7th.
$4,416.7
Ranked 5th. 13% more than Canada

Health services > Hospital beds > Per 1,000 people 3.4
Ranked 49th.
5.5
Ranked 27th. 62% more than Canada

Health services > Nurses and midwives > Per 1,000 people 10.05
Ranked 7th.
11.03
Ranked 1st. 10% more than Canada
Health services > Out-of-pocket health expenditure > % of private expenditure on health 49.58%
Ranked 161st.
75.04%
Ranked 117th. 51% more than Canada

SOURCES: CIA World Factbook, December 2003; UN (United Nations). 2002. United Nations Population Division Database on Contraceptive Use. Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. January. New York; OECD Health Data 2005; World Health Organization; WHO (World Health Organization). 2001. Correspondence on access to essential drugs. Department of Essential Drugs and Medecines Policy. February. Geneva; CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; GECD Health Data 2002; OECD Health Data 2003; International Committee of the Red Cross; World Bank. 2002. World Development Indicators 2002. CD-ROM. Washington, DC; United Nations Population Division, World Population Prospects: The 1994 Revision, 1994; UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre; World Health Organization2005; Abstracted from center-specific counts (Worldwide Transplant Center Directory, 2002); OECD; annual figures:WHO databank, National Bureaus of Statistics. 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"Health: Canada and Switzerland compared", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/compare/Canada/Switzerland/Health

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