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Country vs country: Canada and United States compared: Military

Author: Edsel.G

Author: Edsel.G

Canada and the United States are nearly inseparable. They are so linked it is sometimes hard to think they are two separate countries. But they are, and neither one wants to be part of the other.

Economically, the two countries are giants. While Canada’s economy is far from that of the US, it is still very stable and very capable. Militarily, both countries are so much linked that their internal policies require each other’s army to come to the aid of the other (Canada gets most of its weapons from the US). Thus, a conflict between the two is truly hard to imagine, in not utterly impossible.

But, for the sake of argument, let us compare the armed services of the two. For the sake of argument, let us say that the two countries are on the verge of war. One need not look long and hard to determine which side will be the winner. Statistically, the US is ahead in everything, and the lead in everything is huge. For instance, Canada has 201 operational tanks, the US has a whooping 8,325 M1 Abrams. Canada has 4 advanced diesel subs, while the US has 72 nuclear-powered submarines.

Of course, numbers are not everything. Statistics will tell us that North Korea has the most number of naval assets, but most of these are small patrol boats armed with machine guns. This does not make NoKor’s navy the world’s most powerful. However, in a contest between the US and Canada, both countries possess highly advanced materiel. So, essentially, the US is the apparent and unquestionable winner.

Definitions

  • Armed forces personnel: Total armed forces (2000)
  • Conscription: A description of the status of conscription in the nation in 1997.
  • Expenditures > Percent of GDP: Current military expenditures as an estimated percent of gross domestic product (GDP).
  • Manpower reaching militarily significant age annually > Males: This entry is derived from Military > Manpower reaching militarily significant age annually, which gives the number of males and females entering the military manpower pool (i.e., reaching age 16) in any given year and is a measure of the availability of military-age young adults.
  • Manpower reaching military age annually > Males: This entry is derived from Military > Manpower reaching military age annually, which gives the number of males and females entering the military manpower pool (i.e., reaching age 16) in any given year and is a measure of the availability of military-age young adults.
  • Military branches: This entry lists the service branches subordinate to defense ministries or the equivalent (typically ground, naval, air, and marine forces).
  • Military expenditures: This entry gives spending on defense programs for the most recent year available as a percent of gross domestic product (GDP); the GDP is calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in terms of purchasing power parity (PPP). For countries with no military forces, this figure can include expenditures on public security and police.
  • Military expenditures > Percent of GDP: This entry gives spending on defense programs for the most recent year available as a percent of gross domestic product (GDP); the GDP is calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in terms of purchasing power parity (PPP). For countries with no military forces, this figure can include expenditures on public security and police.
  • Military service age and obligation: This entry gives the required ages for voluntary or conscript military service and the length of service obligation.
  • Personnel: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organization, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces.
  • Personnel > Per capita: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organization, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Service age and obligation: This entry gives the required ages for voluntary or conscript military service and the length of sevice obligation.
STAT Canada United States HISTORY
Armed forces personnel 59,000
Ranked 59th.
1.37 million
Ranked 3rd. 23 times more than Canada

Conscription No <a href=/graph-T/mil_con>conscription</a> (<a href=/encyclopedia/artificial-intelligence>AI</a>). No <a href=/graph-T/mil_con>conscription</a>.

Expenditures > Percent of GDP 1.1%
Ranked 122nd.
4.06%
Ranked 22nd. 4 times more than Canada

Manpower available for military service > Males age 16-49 None None

Manpower fit for military service > Males age 16-49 None None

Manpower reaching militarily significant age annually > Males 218,069
Ranked 51st.
2.16 million
Ranked 5th. 10 times more than Canada

Manpower reaching military age annually > Males 218,069
Ranked 51st.
2.16 million
Ranked 5th. 10 times more than Canada

Military branches Canadian Forces: Canadian Army, Royal Canadian Navy, Royal Canadian Air Force, Canada Command (homeland security) United States Armed Forces: US Army, US Navy (includes Marine Corps), US Air Force, US Coast Guard

Military expenditures 1.1% of GDP
Ranked 29th.
4.6% of GDP
Ranked 1st. 4 times more than Canada

Military expenditures > Percent of GDP 1.1% of GDP
Ranked 54th.
4.06% of GDP
Ranked 10th. 4 times more than Canada

Military service age and obligation 17 years of age for voluntary male and female military service (with parental consent); 16 years of age for Reserve and Military College applicants; Canadian citizenship or permanent residence status required; maximum 34 years of age; service obligation 3-9 years 18 years of age (17 years of age with parental consent) for male and female voluntary service; no conscription; maximum enlistment age 42 (Army), 27 (Air Force), 34 (Navy), 28 (Marines); service obligation 8 years, including 2-5 years active duty (Army), 2 years active (Navy), 4 years active (Air Force, Marines); DoD is eliminating prohibitions restricting women from assignments in units smaller than brigades or near combat units

Personnel 71,000
Ranked 64th.
1.55 million
Ranked 3rd. 22 times more than Canada

Personnel > Per capita 2.2 per 1,000 people
Ranked 123th.
5.22 per 1,000 people
Ranked 70th. 2 times more than Canada

Service age and obligation 17 years of age for male and female voluntary military service (with parental consent); 16 years of age for reserve and military college applicants; Canadian citizenship or permanent residence status required; maximum 34 years of age; service obligation 3-9 years 18 years of age (17 years of age with parental consent) for male and female voluntary service; maximum enlistment age 42 (Army), 27 (Air Force), 34 (Navy), 28 (Marines); service obligation 8 years, including 2-5 years active duty (Army), 2 years active (Navy), 4 years active (Air Force, Marines)

Weapon holdings 1.77 million
Ranked 44th.
38.54 million
Ranked 1st. 22 times more than Canada

SOURCES: IISS (International Institute for Strategic Studies). 2001. The Military Balance 2001-2002. Oxford: Oxford University Press; Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Geneva, Switzerland, 1997. Data collected from the nations concerned, unless otherwise indicated. Acronyms: Amnesty International (AI); European Council of Conscripts Organizations (ECCO); Friends World Committee for Consultation (FWCC); International Helsinki Federation for Human Rights (IHFHR); National Interreligious Service Board for Conscientious Objectors (NISBCO); Service, Peace and Justice in Latin America (SERPAJ); War Resisters International (WRI); World Council of Churches (WCC); All CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 18 December 2008; CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; CIA World Factbooks 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013; World Development Indicators database; Bonn International Center for Conversion (BICC)

Citation

"Military: Canada and United States compared", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/compare/Canada/United-States/Military

1

Canada and the United States are nearly inseparable. They are so linked it is sometimes hard to think they are two separate countries. But they are, and neither one wants to be part of the other.

Economically, the two countries are giants. While Canada’s economy is far from that of the US, it is still very stable and very capable. Militarily, both countries are so much linked that their internal policies require each other’s army to come to the aid of the other (Canada gets most of its weapons from the US). Thus, a conflict between the two is truly hard to imagine, in not utterly impossible.

But, for the sake of argument, let us compare the armed services of the two. For the sake of argument, let us say that the two countries are on the verge of war. One need not look long and hard to determine which side will be the winner. Statistically, the US is ahead in everything, and the lead in everything is huge. For instance, Canada has 201 operational tanks, the US has a whooping 8,325 M1 Abrams. Canada has 4 advanced diesel subs, while the US has 72 nuclear-powered submarines.

Of course, numbers are not everything. Statistics will tell us that North Korea has the most number of naval assets, but most of these are small patrol boats armed with machine guns. This does not make NoKor’s navy the world’s most powerful. However, in a contest between the US and Canada, both countries possess highly advanced materiel. So, essentially, the US is the apparent and unquestionable winner.

Posted on 06 Apr 2014

Edsel.G

Edsel.G

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