×

Country vs country: Japan and United States compared: People > Migration stats

Definitions

  • Asylum Seekers: Thousands of asylum seekers coming into a nation in 2001.
  • Asylum Seekers per million: Thousands of asylum seekers coming into a nation in 2001. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Asylum seekers acceptance rates > 1990-99: % of asylum seekers accepted between the years 1990 and 1999.
  • Foreign population: Foreign population as % of total population; data for 2000
  • Foreign worker salaries: Workers' remittances and compensation of employees comprise current transfers by migrant workers and wages and salaries earned by nonresident workers. Remittances are classified as current private transfers from migrant workers resident in the host country for more than a year, irrespective of their immigration status, to recipients in their country of origin. Migrants' transfers are defined as the net worth of migrants who are expected to remain in the host country for more than one year that is transferred from one country to another at the time of migration. Compensation of employees is the income of migrants who have lived in the host country for less than a year. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • International migrant stock > Total: International migrant stock is the number of people born in a country other than that in which they live. It also includes refugees. The data used to estimate the international migrant stock at a particular time are obtained mainly from population censuses. The estimates are derived from the data on foreign-born population--people who have residence in one country but were born in another country. When data on the foreign-born population are not available, data on foreign population--that is, people who are citizens of a country other than the country in which they reside--are used as estimates. After the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991 people living in one of the newly independent countries who were born in another were classified as international migrants. Estimates of migrant stock in the newly independent states from 1990 on are based on the 1989 census of the Soviet Union. For countries with information on the international migrant stock for at least two points in time, interpolation or extrapolation was used to estimate the international migrant stock on July 1 of the reference years. For countries with only one observation, estimates for the reference years were derived using rates of change in the migrant stock in the years preceding or following the single observation available. A model was used to estimate migrants for countries that had no data."
  • Net migration: Net migration is the net total of migrants during the period, that is, the total number of immigrants less the annual number of emigrants, including both citizens and noncitizens. Data are five-year estimates. To derive estimates of net migration, the United Nations Population Division takes into account the past migration history of a country or area, the migration policy of a country, and the influx of refugees in recent periods. The data to calculate these official estimates come from a variety of sources, including border statistics, administrative records, surveys, and censuses. When no official estimates can be made because of insufficient data, net migration is derived through the balance equation, which is the difference between overall population growth and the natural increase during the 1990-2000 intercensal period."
  • Net migration > Per capita: Net migration is the net total of migrants during the period, that is, the total number of immigrants less the annual number of emigrants, including both citizens and noncitizens. Data are five-year estimates. To derive estimates of net migration, the United Nations Population Division takes into account the past migration history of a country or area, the migration policy of a country, and the influx of refugees in recent periods. The data to calculate these official estimates come from a variety of sources, including border statistics, administrative records, surveys, and censuses. When no official estimates can be made because of insufficient data, net migration is derived through the balance equation, which is the difference between overall population growth and the natural increase during the 1990-2000 intercensal period." Per capita figures expressed per 1 million population.
  • Net migration rate: The difference between the number of persons entering and leaving a country during the year per 1,000 persons (based on midyear population). An excess of persons entering the country is referred to as net immigration (e.g., 3.56 migrants/1,000 population); an excess of persons leaving the country as net emigration (e.g., -9.26 migrants/1,000 population). The net migration rate indicates the contribution of migration to the overall level of population change. High levels of migration can cause problems such as increasing unemployment and potential ethnic strife (if people are coming in) or a reduction in the labor force, perhaps in certain key sectors (if people are leaving).
  • New citizenships: Thousands of people who acquired nationality in 2000. Statistics cover all means of acquiring the nationality of a country, except where otherwise indicated. These include standard naturalisation procedures subject to age, residency, etc. criteria, as well as situations where nationality is acquired through a declaration or by option (following marriage, adoption, or other situations related to residency or descent), recovery of former nationality and other special means of acquiring the nationality of a country. For more details on sources, refer to the notes at the end of the OECD Annex.
  • New citizenships per million: Thousands of people who acquired nationality in 2000. Statistics cover all means of acquiring the nationality of a country, except where otherwise indicated. These include standard naturalisation procedures subject to age, residency, etc. criteria, as well as situations where nationality is acquired through a declaration or by option (following marriage, adoption, or other situations related to residency or descent), recovery of former nationality and other special means of acquiring the nationality of a country. For more details on sources, refer to the notes at the end of the OECD Annex. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Refugee population by country or territory of asylum: Refugees are people who are recognized as refugees under the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees or its 1967 Protocol, the 1969 Organisation of African Unity Convention Governing the Specific Aspects of Refugee Problems in Africa, people recognized as refugees in accordance with the UNHCR statute, people granted refugee-like humanitarian status, and people provided temporary protection. Asylum seekers--people who have applied for asylum or refugee status and who have not yet received a decision or who are registered as asylum seekers--are excluded. Palestinian refugees are people (and their descendants) whose residence was Palestine between June 1946 and May 1948 and who lost their homes and means of livelihood as a result of the 1948 Arab-Israeli conflict. Country of asylum is the country where an asylum claim was filed and granted."
  • Refugee population by country or territory of asylum > Per capita: Refugees are people who are recognized as refugees under the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees or its 1967 Protocol, the 1969 Organisation of African Unity Convention Governing the Specific Aspects of Refugee Problems in Africa, people recognized as refugees in accordance with the UNHCR statute, people granted refugee-like humanitarian status, and people provided temporary protection. Asylum seekers--people who have applied for asylum or refugee status and who have not yet received a decision or who are registered as asylum seekers--are excluded. Palestinian refugees are people (and their descendants) whose residence was Palestine between June 1946 and May 1948 and who lost their homes and means of livelihood as a result of the 1948 Arab-Israeli conflict. Country of asylum is the country where an asylum claim was filed and granted." Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Refugee population by country or territory of origin: Refugees are people who are recognized as refugees under the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees or its 1967 Protocol, the 1969 Organisation of African Unity Convention Governing the Specific Aspects of Refugee Problems in Africa, people recognized as refugees in accordance with the UNHCR statute, people granted refugee-like humanitarian status, and people provided temporary protection. Asylum seekers--people who have applied for asylum or refugee status and who have not yet received a decision or who are registered as asylum seekers--are excluded. Palestinian refugees are people (and their descendants) whose residence was Palestine between June 1946 and May 1948 and who lost their homes and means of livelihood as a result of the 1948 Arab-Israeli conflict. Country of origin generally refers to the nationality or country of citizenship of a claimant."
  • Refugee population by country or territory of origin > Per capita: Refugees are people who are recognized as refugees under the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees or its 1967 Protocol, the 1969 Organisation of African Unity Convention Governing the Specific Aspects of Refugee Problems in Africa, people recognized as refugees in accordance with the UNHCR statute, people granted refugee-like humanitarian status, and people provided temporary protection. Asylum seekers--people who have applied for asylum or refugee status and who have not yet received a decision or who are registered as asylum seekers--are excluded. Palestinian refugees are people (and their descendants) whose residence was Palestine between June 1946 and May 1948 and who lost their homes and means of livelihood as a result of the 1948 Arab-Israeli conflict. Country of origin generally refers to the nationality or country of citizenship of a claimant." Per capita figures expressed per 1 million population.
  • Asylum Seekers > 1980-89: Total number of asylum seekers between the years 1980 and 1989.
  • Asylum seekers acceptance rates > 1980-89: % of asylum seekers accepted between the years 1980 and 1989.
  • Refugees > Inflow 1990-99: Number of refugees accepted by each country between the years 1990 and 1999.
  • Asylum Seekers > 1990-99: Total number of asylum seekers between the years 1980 and 1989.
  • Asylum Seekers > Per $ GDP: Thousands of asylum seekers coming into a nation in 2001. Per $ GDP figures expressed per $1 million of Gross Domestic Product.
  • International migrant stock > % of population: International migrant stock is the number of people born in a country other than that in which they live. It also includes refugees. The data used to estimate the international migrant stock at a particular time are obtained mainly from population censuses. The estimates are derived from the data on foreign-born population--people who have residence in one country but were born in another country. When data on the foreign-born population are not available, data on foreign population--that is, people who are citizens of a country other than the country in which they reside--are used as estimates. After the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991 people living in one of the newly independent countries who were born in another were classified as international migrants. Estimates of migrant stock in the newly independent states from 1990 on are based on the 1989 census of the Soviet Union. For countries with information on the international migrant stock for at least two points in time, interpolation or extrapolation was used to estimate the international migrant stock on July 1 of the reference years. For countries with only one observation, estimates for the reference years were derived using rates of change in the migrant stock in the years preceding or following the single observation available. A model was used to estimate migrants for countries that had no data."
  • Emigration rate of tertiary educated > % of total tertiary educated population: Emigration rate of tertiary educated shows the stock of emigrants ages 25 and older, residing in an OECD country other than that in which they were born, with at least one year of tertiary education as a percentage of the population age 25 and older with tertiary education."
  • Refugees > Inflow 1990-99 per million: Number of refugees accepted by each country between the years 1990 and 1999. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Asylum Seekers > 1980-89 per million: Total number of asylum seekers between the years 1980 and 1989. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • New citizenships > Per $ GDP: Thousands of people who acquired nationality in 2000. Statistics cover all means of acquiring the nationality of a country, except where otherwise indicated. These include standard naturalisation procedures subject to age, residency, etc. criteria, as well as situations where nationality is acquired through a declaration or by option (following marriage, adoption, or other situations related to residency or descent), recovery of former nationality and other special means of acquiring the nationality of a country. For more details on sources, refer to the notes at the end of the OECD Annex. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 billion $ gross domestic product.
  • Foreign worker salaries > % of GDP: Workers' remittances and compensation of employees comprise current transfers by migrant workers and wages and salaries earned by nonresident workers. Data are the sum of three items defined in the fifth edition of the IMF's Balance of Payments Manual: workers' remittances, compensation of employees, and migrants' transfers. Remittances are classified as current private transfers from migrant workers resident in the host country for more than a year, irrespective of their immigration status, to recipients in their country of origin. Migrants' transfers are defined as the net worth of migrants who are expected to remain in the host country for more than one year that is transferred from one country to another at the time of migration. Compensation of employees is the income of migrants who have lived in the host country for less than a year."
  • Asylum Seekers > 1990-99 > Per $ GDP: Total number of asylum seekers between the years 1980 and 1989. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 14.1 billion $ gross domestic product.
  • Asylum Seekers > 1990-99 per million: Total number of asylum seekers between the years 1980 and 1989. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Asylum Seekers > 1980-89 > Per $ GDP: Total number of asylum seekers between the years 1980 and 1989. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 14.1 billion $ gross domestic product.
STAT Japan United States HISTORY
Asylum Seekers 0.4
Ranked 27th.
86.4
Ranked 3rd. 216 times more than Japan
Asylum Seekers per million 0.00315
Ranked 28th.
0.303
Ranked 21st. 96 times more than Japan
Asylum seekers acceptance rates > 1990-99 9.2%
Ranked 18th.
43.9%
Ranked 5th. 5 times more than Japan
Foreign population 1.3%
Ranked 23th.
10.4%
Ranked 6th. 8 times more than Japan
Foreign worker salaries 4.07 billion
Ranked 19th.
48.31 billion
Ranked 2nd. 12 times more than Japan

International migrant stock > Total 2 million
Ranked 21st.
39.27 million
Ranked 2nd. 20 times more than Japan

Net migration 82,000
Ranked 41st.
5.68 million
Ranked 2nd. 69 times more than Japan

Net migration > Per capita 641.76 per 1 million people
Ranked 80th.
19,148.45 per 1 million people
Ranked 34th. 30 times more than Japan

Net migration rate 0.0
Ranked 90th.
2.92 migrant(s)/1,000 populati
Ranked 29th.

New citizenships 15 thousand
Ranked 13th.
898 thousand
Ranked 1st. 60 times more than Japan
New citizenships per million 0.118 thousand
Ranked 19th.
3.18 thousand
Ranked 7th. 27 times more than Japan
Refugee population by country or territory of asylum 2,332
Ranked 91st.
275,461
Ranked 10th. 118 times more than Japan

Refugee population by country or territory of asylum > Per capita 0.016 per 1,000 people
Ranked 125th.
0.92 per 1,000 people
Ranked 66th. 58 times more than Japan

Refugee population by country or territory of origin 150
Ranked 121st.
2,368
Ranked 68th. 16 times more than Japan

Refugee population by country or territory of origin > Per capita 1.45 per 1 million people
Ranked 171st.
7.03 per 1 million people
Ranked 153th. 5 times more than Japan

Asylum Seekers > 1980-89 0.9
Ranked 15th.
395.8
Ranked 2nd. 440 times more than Japan
Asylum seekers acceptance rates > 1980-89 27.9%
Ranked 11th. 4% more than United States
26.8%
Ranked 12th.
Refugees > Inflow 1990-99 42
Ranked 13th.
1,089
Ranked 1st. 26 times more than Japan
Asylum Seekers > 1990-99 1.1
Ranked 18th.
897.6
Ranked 2nd. 816 times more than Japan
Asylum Seekers > Per $ GDP 1.07e-07 per $1 million
Ranked 28th.
7.35e-06 per $1 million
Ranked 25th. 69 times more than Japan
International migrant stock > % of population 1.56%
Ranked 146th.
13.28%
Ranked 46th. 9 times more than Japan

Emigration rate of tertiary educated > % of total tertiary educated population 1.24%
Ranked 171st. 3 times more than United States
0.45%
Ranked 180th.

Refugees > Inflow 1990-99 per million 0.34
Ranked 17th.
4.36
Ranked 10th. 13 times more than Japan
Asylum Seekers > 1980-89 per million 0.00771
Ranked 16th.
1.74
Ranked 11th. 226 times more than Japan
New citizenships > Per $ GDP 0.004 per $1 billion
Ranked 19th.
0.076 per $1 billion
Ranked 11th. 19 times more than Japan
Foreign worker salaries > % of GDP 0.04%
Ranked 144th. Twice as much as United States
0.02%
Ranked 146th.

Asylum Seekers > 1990-99 > Per $ GDP 0.004 per $14.1 billion of GDP
Ranked 18th.
1.08 per $14.1 billion of GDP
Ranked 16th. 269 times more than Japan
Asylum Seekers > 1990-99 per million 0.0089
Ranked 18th.
3.6
Ranked 15th. 404 times more than Japan
Asylum Seekers > 1980-89 > Per $ GDP 0.003 per $14.1 billion of GDP
Ranked 16th.
0.475 per $14.1 billion of GDP
Ranked 11th. 158 times more than Japan

SOURCES: OECD; OECD. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; OECD; OECD; World Bank staff estimates based on IMF balance of payments data.; United Nations Population Division, Trends in Total Migrant Stock: 2008 Revision.; United Nations Population Division, World Population Prospects 2008.; All CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 18 December 2008; United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Statistical Yearbook and data files, complemented by statistics on Palestinian refugees under the mandate of the UNRWA as published on its website. Data from UNHCR are available online at: www.unhcr.org/statistics/populationdatabase.; Fr\xE9d\xE9ric Docquier, Abdeslam Marfouk, and B. Lindsay Lowell's, ""A Gendered Assessment of the Brain Drain"" (2007).; OECD. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; World Bank staff estimates based on IMF balance of payments data, and World Bank and OECD GDP estimates.

Citation

"People > Migration: Japan and United States compared", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/compare/Japan/United-States/People/Migration