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Norway

Norway Public expenditure Stats

Definitions

  • Health expenditure > Public expenditure on health: Total expenditure on health measures the final consumption of health goods and services (i.e. current health expenditure) plus capital investment in health care infrastructure. This includes spending by both public and private sources (including households) on medical services and goods, public health and prevention programmes and administration. Excluded are health-related expenditures such as training, research and environmental health.
  • Health expenditure > Total expenditure on health: Total expenditure on health measures the final consumption of health goods and services (i.e. current health expenditure) plus capital investment in health care infrastructure. This includes spending by both public and private sources (including households) on medical services and goods, public health and prevention programmes and administration. Excluded are health-related expenditures such as training, research and environmental health.
  • Social expenditure > Public social expenditure: Public social expenditure comprises cash benefits, direct "in-kind” provision of goods and services, and tax breaks with social purposes. To be considered "social”, benefits have to address one or more social goals. Benefits may be targeted at low-income households, but they may also be for the elderly, disabled, sick, unemployed, or young persons. Programmes regulating the provision of social benefits have to involve: a) redistribution of resources across households, or b) compulsory participation. Social benefits are regarded as public when general government (that is central, state, and local governments, including social security funds) controls relevant financial flows. The expenditures shown here refer only to public social benefits and exclude similar benefits provided by private charities.
  • Social expenditure > Public social expenditure per million: Public social expenditure comprises cash benefits, direct "in-kind” provision of goods and services, and tax breaks with social purposes. To be considered "social”, benefits have to address one or more social goals. Benefits may be targeted at low-income households, but they may also be for the elderly, disabled, sick, unemployed, or young persons. Programmes regulating the provision of social benefits have to involve: a) redistribution of resources across households, or b) compulsory participation. Social benefits are regarded as public when general government (that is central, state, and local governments, including social security funds) controls relevant financial flows. The expenditures shown here refer only to public social benefits and exclude similar benefits provided by private charities. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK
Health expenditure > Public expenditure on health 7.3% 2009 8th out of 30
Health expenditure > Total expenditure on health 8.7% 2009 16th out of 30
Social expenditure > Public social expenditure 21.6% 2009 12th out of 30
Social expenditure > Public social expenditure per million 4.47% 2009 5th out of 30

SOURCES: OECD Country statistical profiles 2009; OECD Country statistical profiles 2009. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.

Citation

"Norway Public expenditure Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/Norway/Economy/Public-expenditure