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Norway

Norway Religion Stats

Definitions

STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Buddhism > By Country > Buddhism > Buddhist total 19437 1943
Christian > Mormon > Congregations 23 2014 61st out of 175
Christian > Orthodox > Orthodox population 9,894 2014 43th out of 43
Christian > Protestant > Protestant percent 90% 2014 4th out of 58
Christianity > Percent Christian 85.6% 2009 7th out of 13
Christianity > Regular church attendance 250,000 2014 6th out of 6
Islam > Percentage Muslim 1.6% 2004 110th out of 167
Major religion(s) Christianity 2013
Muslim > Muslim percentage of total population 3% 2014 101st out of 184
Muslim > Muslim population 144,000 2014 109th out of 177
Religions Church of Norway 85.7%, Pentecostal 1%, Roman Catholic 1%, other Christian 2.4%, Muslim 1.8%, other 8.1% 2004
Religions > All Church of Norway 85.7%, Pentecostal 1%, Roman Catholic 1%, other Christian 2.4%, Muslim 1.8%, other 8.1% (2004) 2006
Secularism and atheism > Population considering religion important 20.5% 2014 140th out of 143
Secularism and atheism > Population considering religion unimportant 78% 2014 4th out of 143
Seventh-day Adventist Membership 4,697 2004 101st out of 230

Citation

"Norway Religion Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/Norway/Religion

Norway Religion Profiles (Subcategories)

Buddhism 3 Religions 3
Christian 14

0

Hi. For anyone reading this, I will post a response.
I am born in Norway and have lived 22 years in Oslo and 2 years other places in Norway, and travelled my country a LOT. Generally speaking:

I can safely tell you that Norwegians are extremely non-religious, as the church attendance stat will tell. Those that go to church often do so for random reasons too. I am agnostic and been to church several times, Im also baptized and confirmed christian. None of this matters to me, and I believe most feel the same way I do.
Atheism isn't particularly practiced either, we simply don't think about the issue (may sound strange to some).
It is not normal to wear a T-shirt with a religious slogan, for example. If you did people would react with awkwardness, but probably politely not say anything.
To sum it up, most religious activities here would be based on tradition rather than belief. Religion (or anti religion) is very rarely brought up in regular conversations, and I've never met any civilian preacher of any kind ever. I am in the belief that we are generally very respectful about other's beliefs, as long as they are subtle about it (this includes atheists), and they are.

Hope that helps with any curiosity any foreigner would have.

Posted on 29 Jan 2013

Sebastian

Sebastian