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Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea Government debt Stats

Definitions

  • Deficit and financing > Cash surplus or deficit > % of GDP: Cash surplus or deficit is revenue (including grants) minus expense, minus net acquisition of nonfinancial assets. In the 1986 GFS manual nonfinancial assets were included under revenue and expenditure in gross terms. This cash surplus or deficit is closest to the earlier overall budget balance (still missing is lending minus repayments, which are now a financing item under net acquisition of financial assets)."
  • Deficit and financing > Cash surplus or deficit > Current LCU: Cash surplus or deficit is revenue (including grants) minus expense, minus net acquisition of nonfinancial assets. In the 1986 GFS manual nonfinancial assets were included under revenue and expenditure in gross terms. This cash surplus or deficit is closest to the earlier overall budget balance (still missing is lending minus repayments, which are now a financing item under net acquisition of financial assets)."
  • Deficit and financing > Central government debt > Total > % of GDP: Debt is the entire stock of direct government fixed-term contractual obligations to others outstanding on a particular date. It includes domestic and foreign liabilities such as currency and money deposits, securities other than shares, and loans. It is the gross amount of government liabilities reduced by the amount of equity and financial derivatives held by the government. Because debt is a stock rather than a flow, it is measured as of a given date, usually the last day of the fiscal year."
  • Deficit and financing > Central government debt > Total > Current LCU: Debt is the entire stock of direct government fixed-term contractual obligations to others outstanding on a particular date. It includes domestic and foreign liabilities such as currency and money deposits, securities other than shares, and loans. It is the gross amount of government liabilities reduced by the amount of equity and financial derivatives held by the government. Because debt is a stock rather than a flow, it is measured as of a given date, usually the last day of the fiscal year."
  • Deficit and financing > Net incurrence of liabilities > Domestic > % of GDP: Net incurrence of government liabilities includes foreign financing (obtained from nonresidents) and domestic financing (obtained from residents), or the means by which a government provides financial resources to cover a budget deficit or allocates financial resources arising from a budget surplus. The net incurrence of liabilities should be offset by the net acquisition of financial assets (a third financing item). The difference between the cash surplus or deficit and the three financing items is the net change in the stock of cash."
  • Deficit and financing > Net incurrence of liabilities > Domestic > Current LCU: Net incurrence of government liabilities includes foreign financing (obtained from nonresidents) and domestic financing (obtained from residents), or the means by which a government provides financial resources to cover a budget deficit or allocates financial resources arising from a budget surplus. The net incurrence of liabilities should be offset by the net acquisition of financial assets (a third financing item). The difference between the cash surplus or deficit and the three financing items is the net change in the stock of cash."
  • Deficit and financing > Net incurrence of liabilities > Foreign > % of GDP: Net incurrence of government liabilities includes foreign financing (obtained from nonresidents) and domestic financing (obtained from residents), or the means by which a government provides financial resources to cover a budget deficit or allocates financial resources arising from a budget surplus. The net incurrence of liabilities should be offset by the net acquisition of financial assets (a third financing item). The difference between the cash surplus or deficit and the three financing items is the net change in the stock of cash."
  • Deficit and financing > Net incurrence of liabilities > Foreign > Current LCU: Net incurrence of government liabilities includes foreign financing (obtained from nonresidents) and domestic financing (obtained from residents), or the means by which a government provides financial resources to cover a budget deficit or allocates financial resources arising from a budget surplus. The net incurrence of liabilities should be offset by the net acquisition of financial assets (a third financing item). The difference between the cash surplus or deficit and the three financing items is the net change in the stock of cash."
STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Deficit and financing > Cash surplus or deficit > % of GDP -2.26% 2002 46th out of 83
Deficit and financing > Cash surplus or deficit > Current LCU -263,810,000 2002 27th out of 82
Deficit and financing > Central government debt > Total > % of GDP 69.73% 2002 8th out of 52
Deficit and financing > Central government debt > Total > Current LCU 8.13 billion 2002 44th out of 51
Deficit and financing > Net incurrence of liabilities > Domestic > % of GDP 4.91% 2002 5th out of 63
Deficit and financing > Net incurrence of liabilities > Domestic > Current LCU 572.14 million 2002 37th out of 62
Deficit and financing > Net incurrence of liabilities > Foreign > % of GDP -2.19% 2002 59th out of 61
Deficit and financing > Net incurrence of liabilities > Foreign > Current LCU -255,345,000 2002 49th out of 60

SOURCES: International Monetary Fund, Government Finance Statistics Yearbook and data files, and World Bank and OECD GDP estimates.; International Monetary Fund, Government Finance Statistics Yearbook and data files.

Citation

"Papua New Guinea Government debt Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/Papua-New-Guinea/Economy/Government-debt

Papua New Guinea Economy > Government debt Profiles (Subcategories)

Deficit and financing 8