×
Slovenia

Facts and stats about Slovenia

chris.lockyer781

Author: chris.lockyer781

Slovenia is a country of opposites: situated between the Alps to the North and Adriatic Sea to the West it provides both plentiful opportunities for enjoying winter sports and pleasant summer resorts. It has a typical urbanization of a developed country, yet its land is predominantly covered with forest (63.28% of land area in 2007), which is comparable to Scandinavian countries with significantly lower density of population. It’s been a member of European Union since 2004 and was the most economically advanced nation within ex-Yugoslavia, but the people are still heavily under the influence of tradition, which is somewhat slowing down the economic development. Unemployment rate has increased in the past few years due to recession, peaked in 2012 at almost 12% and is now stabilized and slowly dropping. Since the breakup of Yugoslavia, which Slovenia managed to escape relatively unscathed (with only ten-day war, compared to four years in Croatia), and especially since joining the European Union and consequently adopting euro as a national currency, Slovenia is becoming more and more attractive both for business and real-estate investments, and as a tourist destination (8.42% of total income in 2008). On the other hand, due to smallness of the country as a whole - there are only two public universities in the country and the market for specialized businesses is small due to the language barrier - there’s a big brain-drain to other members of European Union and anglophone countries, even more pronounced since the financial crisis of 2008.

1.99 million

Population. Ranked 147th in 2013.

$22,000.51

GDP per capita. Ranked 32nd in 2012.

Borders

Austria 330 km, Croatia 455 km, Hungary 102 km, Italy 199 km
Largest city Ljubljana - 330,000
Capital city Ljubljana - 330,000
Major language Slovene
Major religion Christianity
Monetary unit tolar
Prime minister Alenka Bratusek
Alternative names Republic of Slovenia, Slovenija, Republika Slovenija, Slovenia
Groups Christian countries, Cold countries, Eastern Europe, Europe, European Union, Eurozone, Former Yugoslavian countries , High income OECD countries, NATO countries, World

Interesting observations about Slovenia

Slovenia ranked first for age structure > 55-64 years amongst Christian countries in 2013.
Slovenia ranked first for GDP per capita amongst Eastern Europe in 2012.
Slovenia ranked first for percentage living in rural areas. amongst European Union in 2003.
Slovenia ranked second for labor force amongst Europe in 2013.
Slovenia ranked first for agricultural machinery > tractors > per capita globally in 2003.
Slovenia ranked 4th last for population amongst High income OECD countries in 2013.
Slovenia ranked 5th last for GDP amongst Eurozone in 2012.
Slovenia ranked 4th last for birth rate amongst Cold countries in 2013.
Slovenia ranked first for rural population density > rural population per sq. km of arable land amongst NATO countries in 2005.
Slovenia has had the highest agricultural machinery > tractors per 1000 since 1997.

6

Slovenia is a country of opposites: situated between the Alps to the North and Adriatic Sea to the West it provides both plentiful opportunities for enjoying winter sports and pleasant summer resorts. It has a typical urbanization of a developed country, yet its land is predominantly covered with forest (63.28% of land area in 2007), which is comparable to Scandinavian countries with significantly lower density of population. It’s been a member of European Union since 2004 and was the most economically advanced nation within ex-Yugoslavia, but the people are still heavily under the influence of tradition, which is somewhat slowing down the economic development. Unemployment rate has increased in the past few years due to recession, peaked in 2012 at almost 12% and is now stabilized and slowly dropping. Since the breakup of Yugoslavia, which Slovenia managed to escape relatively unscathed (with only ten-day war, compared to four years in Croatia), and especially since joining the European Union and consequently adopting euro as a national currency, Slovenia is becoming more and more attractive both for business and real-estate investments, and as a tourist destination (8.42% of total income in 2008). On the other hand, due to smallness of the country as a whole - there are only two public universities in the country and the market for specialized businesses is small due to the language barrier - there’s a big brain-drain to other members of European Union and anglophone countries, even more pronounced since the financial crisis of 2008.

Posted on 14 Apr 2014

chris.lockyer781

chris.lockyer781

394 Stat enthusiast

0

Monetary unit is not 'tolar' anymore - it's EUR for quite some years now.

Posted on 28 Mar 2014

Anonym

Anonym

Ask A Question

captcha

Was this page useful for you?