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United Kingdom

United Kingdom Lifestyle Stats

Definitions

  • Amateur radio operators: International Amateur Radio Union (2000). "Status Summary of Radio Amateurs & Amateur Stations of the World 2000".
  • Amphetamine use: Percentage of people who have used amphetamines, generally for ages 15 and over. Spain and Greece: data for ages 15-64. Netherlands: data for ages 15-59. United Kingdom: data for ages 16-59. Germany: data for ages 18-59. Belgium: data for ages 18-65. France: data for ages 18-69. Data generally for 1999 or 1998. Germany, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden: data for 1997. Austria: data for 1996. Denmark, France: data for 1995. Belgium: data for 1994. Canada: data for 1993.
  • Cannabis use: Percentage share of people who have used cannabis, generally including people 15 and above. Different nations have, however, focussed their studies on different age groups. United States and Netherlands: data for years 12 and above. Greece: Data for ages 12 to 64. Australia: data for ages 14 and above. United Kingdom: data for ages 16 to 59. Germany: data for ages 18-59. Denmark and France: data for ages 18 to 69. Data for 1998 or 1999 in most cases. Germany, Poland, and Spain: data for 1997. Austria: data for 1996. Denmark, France and Ireland: data for 1995.
  • Discuss politics frequently: Proportions in 1990s surveys responding that they discuss politics frequently.
  • Food and drink > Alcohol > Consumption > 1970: Alcohol consumption - Litres per capita by population aged above 15 in 1970. Data not available for Greece, South Korea or Mexico.
  • Food and drink > Fruit juice > Consumption: Consumption of fruit juices. Litres per person per year, 2002.
  • Forced retirement during recession: Percentages in 1990s surveys agreeing with job priorities for men when jobs are scarce.
  • Happiness level > Very happy: Proportion of people who answered the survey question: "Taking all things together, would you say you are: very happy, quite happy, not very happy, or not at all happy?" by stating that they were "Very happy".
  • Happiness net: This statistic is compiled from responses to the survey question: "Taking all things together, would you say you are: very happy, quite happy, not very happy, or not at all happy?". The "Happiness (net)" statistic was obtained via the following formula: the percentage of people who rated themselves as either "quite happy" or "very happy" minus the percentage of people who rated themselves as either "not very happy" or "not at all happy".
  • Life satisfaction: Most scores are based on responses to the following question: "All things considered, how satisfied or dissatisfied are you with your life-as-a-whole now? 1 dissatisfied to10 satisfied" (item code O-SLW/c/sq/n/10/a). Scores of ten nations are based on responses to a somewhat different question: "Suppose the top of the ladder represents the best possible life for you and the bottom of the ladder the worst possible life. Where on this ladder do you feel you personally stand at the present time?" The response was rated on a ladder scale ranging from 0 to 10 (item code O-BW/c/sq/l/11/c). We transformed the scores using the information of nations in which both this item and the above question on life-satisfaction had been used in about the same years.
  • Life satisfaction inequality: This data is indicative of how much citizens differ in enjoyment of their life-as-a-whole.Life-satisfaction assessed by means of surveys in samples of the general population. Scores may be too low in some countries, due to under sampling of rural and illiterate population. In this ranking the focus is not on the level of happiness in the country, but on inequality in happiness among citizens.Inequality in happiness can be measured by the dispersion of responses to survey-questions. The degree of dispersion can be expressed statistically in the standard deviation and surveys items rated on a 10 step numerical scale are particularly usefull for that purpose. Most scores are based on responses to the following question: "All things considered, how satisfied or dissatisfied are you with your life-as-a-whole now? 1 dissatisfied to10 satisfied".
  • Roller coasters: Number of roller coasters in each country. Includes both wooden and steel constructions.
  • Somewhat interested in politics: Proportions in 1990s surveys responding that they are somewhat interested in politics.
  • Trust people: Percentage in 1990s surveys agreeing that people can be trusted.
  • Will fight for country: Percentage in 1990s surveys responding that they are willing to fight for their country.
STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Amateur radio operators 58,426 2000 8th out of 21
Amphetamine use 3% 1999 2nd out of 26
Cannabis use 9% 1999 4th out of 26
Discuss politics frequently 13% 1990 12th out of 17
Food and drink > Alcohol > Consumption > 1970 7.1 litres per capita 1970 20th out of 26
Food and drink > Fruit juice > Consumption 29.3 litres 2002 8th out of 18
Forced retirement during recession 43% 1990 9th out of 16
Happiness level > Very happy 38% 2005 10th out of 50
Happiness net 87% 2005 9th out of 50
Life satisfaction 7.2 2004 16th out of 69
Life satisfaction inequality 2.2 2004 68th out of 87
Roller coasters 160 2006 3rd out of 75
Somewhat interested in politics 47% 1990 12th out of 17
Trust people 38% 1990 12th out of 17
Will fight for country 74% 1990 7th out of 17

SOURCES: Wikipedia: Amateur radio operator; OECD; World Values Survey; OECD Health Data 2005; Global Market Information Database, published by Euromonitor; World Values Survey 2005; World Database of Happiness, Happiness in Nations, Rank Report 2004/1  Average happiness in 90 nations 1990-2000; World Database of Happiness, Happiness in Nations, Rank Report 2004/3b. Equality of  happiness in 90 nations 1990-2000. How much citizens differ in enjoyment of their life as a whole; The Roller Coaster Database, 2006.

Citation

"United Kingdom Lifestyle Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/United-Kingdom/Lifestyle

0

To get rid of the British Lifestyle Survey callers, I tell them that I charge £3 a question.
This also works for market researchers in the high street.

Posted on 13 Oct 2009

AlanC

AlanC

0

Yes, British Life Style Survey calls are a nuisance. I tried being friendly, asking them questions, but, they take no notice.

The TPS can do nothing about the calls.

I don't like to do it, but, I decided to have some fun with them. Clearly, they are going to call back, and, if they want to waste my time, i'll waste theirs.

Posted on 07 Oct 2009

poshsimon

poshsimon

0

I have just been called by British Lifestyle Survey and I asked if that was the company name. She hung up immediately! It is the second nuisance call I have had today despite also being registered with TPS! (The first was an automatic number dialling system and when I chose the option to speak to someone to get the company name, it put me through to an answering service!) I too am going to report it - the more reports they get, the more pressure they'll get to do something about it.

Posted on 05 Oct 2009

Robinson

Robinson

0

I have had 2 calls in 3 days. I could not understand them for ages and even found myself apologising for their bad English - They assumed I was the person they actually asked for - not me, I asked to speak to someone else as the language barrier was a struggle. The floor manager came to the phone and talked v e r y s l o w l y to me but I still didnt get everything he said. I asked where he got my number from and he said "I honestly got it from the yellow pages" I said no, your not being honest as the name you called me does not exist for the number you called - he hung up. TPS probably wont be able to do anything as they are calling from outside the UK - I was already registered with TPS.

Posted on 29 Sep 2009

Ben Tennyson

Ben Tennyson

0

Brtish Lifestyle Survey: I have been rung four times today, within the space of three hours, by four different people - all with Indian accents but professing to English names like James and John. I asked each one in turn to remove me from the mailing list and not to ring me again. On the fourth call I asked to be put through to a supervisor who was as good as useless. I asked him if his company was registered at Companies House in London and he said yes, when I queried this and asked for the name of the company director he rang off. It seems very fishy indeed. Beware.

Posted on 28 Sep 2009

Elisa

Elisa

0

I have just received two calls from british lifestyle survey.
There is nothing the TPS can do about these calls: they only act for telemarketing calls, not for surveys or charities etc. Nevertheless ~I have contacted them with the details asking for advice as it seems it doesn't matter how many times I ask these w***ers not to ring me back, they still do!! Grrrrr & number withheld. Maybe I should get withheld numbers blocked? Anyway, waiting to see what the TPS advise....

Posted on 15 Sep 2009

Nic JJ

Nic JJ

0

I too have been harrassed by British Lifestyle Survey. Firstly I could not even understand who they were as the accent was so thick - which annoyed them. They started to confirm my name and address then to ask quite personal questions. I asked how they got my details as I have TPS and they declined to answer. I then said 'no more'and put the phone down. I also 1471'd and number not known. I also am reporting them to TPS.

Posted on 10 Sep 2009

Retired

Retired

0

I have had six calls from British Lifestyle Survey in the last four days. I got one of them to tell me that they are calling from Bangladesh. They just will not take me from their lists so I am reporting them to the Telephone Preference Service. If they call you, treat them rough and tell them that you will report them for harassment.HFNRV

Posted on 07 Sep 2009

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