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United States

United States Military Stats

Definitions

  • Air force > Aircraft carriers > Commissioned:

    Amount of aircraft carriers in full service in each country. These numbers can also be interpreted as the amount of each country's commissioned aircraft carriers.   

  • Air force > Aircraft carriers > Total: Total amount of aircraft carriers possessed by each country. 
  • Air force > Bombers: Number of bomber combat aircrafts.
  • Air force > Combat aircraft: Number of fighter aircrafts (fixed wing aircrafts with combat capability).
  • Air force > Fighters: Number of fighter combat aircrafts.
  • Armed forces growth: Growth in the number of armed forces personnel from 1985 (index = 100) to 2000. 100 means no growth, 50 means it halved and 200 means it doubled.
  • Armed forces personnel: Total armed forces (2000)
  • Armed forces personnel > Total: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organisation, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces."
  • Armed forces personnel per 1000: Total armed forces (2000). Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Arms trade > Arms exports, top countries: Compares the world's largest arms exporters, in millions of US Dollars. Data corresponds to the year 2010, and was compiled by SIPRI (Stockholm International Peace Research Institute), a think tank dedicated to the research of conflict, armaments, arms control and disarmament in the world, with presence in Stockholm, Beijing and Washington DC.
  • Arms trade > Arms exports, top countries per million people: Compares the world's largest arms exporters, in millions of US Dollars. Data corresponds to the year 2010, and was compiled by SIPRI (Stockholm International Peace Research Institute), a think tank dedicated to the research of conflict, armaments, arms control and disarmament in the world, with presence in Stockholm, Beijing and Washington DC. Figures expressed per million people for the same year.
  • Arms trade > Arms imports, top countries: Compares the world's largest arms importers, in millions of US Dollars. Data corresponds to the year 2010, and was compiled by SIPRI (Stockholm International Peace Research Institute), a think tank dedicated to the research of conflict, armaments, arms control and disarmament in the world, with presence in Stockholm, Beijing and Washington DC. For more comprehensive statistics, visit the intitute's databases section
  • Army > Attack helicopters: Number of attack helicopter (includes helicopters that have some attacking capabilities).
  • Army > Main battle tanks: Number of main battle tanks.
  • Battle-related deaths > Number of people: Battle-related deaths (number of people). Battle-related deaths are deaths in battle-related conflicts between warring parties in the conflict dyad (two conflict units that are parties to a conflict). Typically, battle-related deaths occur in warfare involving the armed forces of the warring parties. This includes traditional battlefield fighting, guerrilla activities, and all kinds of bombardments of military units, cities, and villages, etc. The targets are usually the military itself and its installations or state institutions and state representatives, but there is often substantial collateral damage in the form of civilians being killed in crossfire, in indiscriminate bombings, etc. All deaths--military as well as civilian--incurred in such situations, are counted as battle-related deaths.
  • Battle-related deaths > Number of people per million: Battle-related deaths (number of people). Battle-related deaths are deaths in battle-related conflicts between warring parties in the conflict dyad (two conflict units that are parties to a conflict). Typically, battle-related deaths occur in warfare involving the armed forces of the warring parties. This includes traditional battlefield fighting, guerrilla activities, and all kinds of bombardments of military units, cities, and villages, etc. The targets are usually the military itself and its installations or state institutions and state representatives, but there is often substantial collateral damage in the form of civilians being killed in crossfire, in indiscriminate bombings, etc. All deaths--military as well as civilian--incurred in such situations, are counted as battle-related deaths. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Branches: The names of the ground, naval, air, marine, and other defense or security forces
  • Budget: Annual defense budget in billion USD.
  • Conscription: A description of the status of conscription in the nation in 1997.
  • Defence spending > Percent of GDP: Defense expenditure as percentage of GDP. Figures are for the year 2010.
  • Expenditure > Current LCU: Military expenditures data from SIPRI are derived from the NATO definition, which includes all current and capital expenditures on the armed forces, including peacekeeping forces; defense ministries and other government agencies engaged in defense projects; paramilitary forces, if these are judged to be trained and equipped for military operations; and military space activities. Such expenditures include military and civil personnel, including retirement pensions of military personnel and social services for personnel; operation and maintenance; procurement; military research and development; and military aid (in the military expenditures of the donor country). Excluded are civil defense and current expenditures for previous military activities, such as for veterans' benefits, demobilization, conversion, and destruction of weapons. This definition cannot be applied for all countries, however, since that would require much more detailed information than is available about what is included in military budgets and off-budget military expenditure items. (For example, military budgets might or might not cover civil defense, reserves and auxiliary forces, police and paramilitary forces, dual-purpose forces such as military and civilian police, military grants in kind, pensions for military personnel, and social security contributions paid by one part of government to another.)
  • Expenditures > Percent of GDP: Current military expenditures as an estimated percent of gross domestic product (GDP).
  • Global Peace Index: The Global Peace Index is comprised of 22 indicators in the three categories ongoing domestic or international conflicts; societal safety; and security and militarization. A low index value indicates a peaceful and safe country.
  • Gulf War Coalition Forces: Number of troops who served on active duty in the Gulf War theater of operations between August 2, 1990, and June 13, 1991.
  • Highest military decorations > Name: Name of each country’s highest military decoration.
  • Imports > USD: Arms transfers cover the supply of military weapons through sales, aid, gifts, and those made through manufacturing licenses. Data cover major conventional weapons such as aircraft, armored vehicles, artillery, radar systems, missiles, and ships designed for military use. Excluded are transfers of other military equipment such as small arms and light weapons, trucks, small artillery, ammunition, support equipment, technology transfers, and other services."
  • Manpower > Reaching military age annually > Males: The number of draft-age males and females entering the military manpower pool in any given year and is a measure of the availability of draft-age young adults.
  • Manpower reaching military age annually > Males: This entry is derived from Military > Manpower reaching military age annually, which gives the number of males and females entering the military manpower pool (i.e., reaching age 16) in any given year and is a measure of the availability of military-age young adults.
  • Military branches: This entry lists the service branches subordinate to defense ministries or the equivalent (typically ground, naval, air, and marine forces).
  • Military expenditure > Current LCU: Military expenditures data from SIPRI are derived from the NATO definition, which includes all current and capital expenditures on the armed forces, including peacekeeping forces; defense ministries and other government agencies engaged in defense projects; paramilitary forces, if these are judged to be trained and equipped for military operations; and military space activities. Such expenditures include military and civil personnel, including retirement pensions of military personnel and social services for personnel; operation and maintenance; procurement; military research and development; and military aid (in the military expenditures of the donor country). Excluded are civil defense and current expenditures for previous military activities, such as for veterans' benefits, demobilisation, conversion, and destruction of weapons. This definition cannot be applied for all countries, however, since that would require much more detailed information than is available about what is included in military budgets and off-budget military expenditure items. (For example, military budgets might or might not cover civil defense, reserves and auxiliary forces, police and paramilitary forces, dual-purpose forces such as military and civilian police, military grants in kind, pensions for military personnel, and social security contributions paid by one part of government to another.)"
  • Military expenditures: This entry gives spending on defense programs for the most recent year available as a percent of gross domestic product (GDP); the GDP is calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in terms of purchasing power parity (PPP). For countries with no military forces, this figure can include expenditures on public security and police.
  • Military service age and obligation: This entry gives the required ages for voluntary or conscript military service and the length of service obligation.
  • NATO > NATO reserves provided: Reserve personnel.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Navy > Aircraft carriers: Number of aircraft carriers.
  • Navy > Amphibious warfare ships: Number of amphibious warfare ships.
  • Navy > Corvette warships: Number of corvettes.
  • Navy > Cruisers: Number of cruisers.
  • Navy > Destroyers: Number of destroyers.
  • Navy > Frigates: Number of frigates.
  • Navy > Helicopter carriers: Amount of helicopter carriers currently in service.
  • Navy > Nuclear submarines: Number of nuclear submarines.
  • Navy > Submarines: Number of patrol boats (includes minesweepers).
  • Nuclear weapons > Atmospheric tests: Atmospheric tests.
  • Nuclear weapons > Non-Proliferation treaty sign date: Signed.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Nuclear weapons > Nuclear tests: Tests.
  • Nuclear weapons > Nuclear warheads: Total nuclear warheads.
  • Nuclear weapons > Peaceful use tests: Peaceful tests.
  • Nuclear weapons > Share of all nuclear tests: By test count.
  • Nuclear weapons > Share of all nuclear tests by yield: By yield.
  • Nuclear weapons > Test detonations: Detonations.
  • Nuclear weapons > Total yield of all tests: Total yield, kt.
  • Paramilitary personnel: Paramilitary.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Personnel: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organization, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces.
  • Personnel > Per capita: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organization, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Personnel per 1000: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organization, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Service age and obligation: This entry gives the required ages for voluntary or conscript military service and the length of sevice obligation.
  • WMD > Missile: A description of the nation's situation with regards to the possession and manufacture of missile weapons of mass destruction
  • WMD > Nuclear: A description of the nation's situation with regards to the possession and manufacture of nuclear weapons
  • War deaths: Battle-related deaths are deaths in battle-related conflicts between warring parties in the conflict dyad (two conflict units that are parties to a conflict). Typically, battle-related deaths occur in warfare involving the armed forces of the warring parties. This includes traditional battlefield fighting, guerrilla activities, and all kinds of bombardments of military units, cities, and villages, etc. The targets are usually the military itself and its installations or state institutions and state representatives, but there is often substantial collateral damage in the form of civilians being killed in crossfire, in indiscriminate bombings, etc. All deaths--military as well as civilian--incurred in such situations, are counted as battle-related deaths."
  • Weapons of mass destruction > Chemical Weapons Convention ratification: Date of ratification of the Chemical Weapon Convention (CWC) of countries who either declared chemical weapon stockpiles, are suspected of secretly stockpiling them, or are running chemical weapons research programs.
  • Weapons of mass destruction > Chemical weapons possession:

    Status of possession of chemical weapons of countries that either declared chemical weapon stockpiles, are suspected of secretly stockpiling them, or are running chemical weapons research programs.

STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Air force > Aircraft carriers > Commissioned 19 2014 1st out of 13
Air force > Aircraft carriers > Total 68 2014 1st out of 16
Air force > Bombers 171 2013 2nd out of 9
Air force > Combat aircraft 3,318 2011 1st out of 11
Air force > Fighters 3,043 2013 1st out of 9
Armed forces growth -37% 2000 107th out of 132
Armed forces personnel 1.37 million 2000 3rd out of 166
Armed forces personnel > Total 1.54 million 2008 4th out of 160
Armed forces personnel per 1000 4.84 2000 57th out of 166
Arms trade > Arms exports, top countries 8,760 2012 1st out of 14
Arms trade > Arms exports, top countries per million people 27.91 2012 5th out of 14
Arms trade > Arms imports, top countries 893 2010 6th out of 15
Army > Attack helicopters 6,417 2011 1st out of 7
Army > Main battle tanks 8,725 2011 1st out of 11
Battle-related deaths > Number of people 233 2001 18th out of 31
Battle-related deaths > Number of people per million 0.818 2001 27th out of 31
Branches US Army, US Navy (includes Marine Corps), US Air Force, US Coast Guard; note - Coast Guard administered in peacetime by the Department of Homeland Security, but in wartime reports to the Department of the Navy 2008
Budget 682 US$ BN 2011 1st out of 10
Conscription No conscription. 1997
Defence spending > Percent of GDP 4.3% 2008 2nd out of 14
Expenditure > Current LCU 507089000000 2005
Expenditures > Percent of GDP 4.06% 2005 22nd out of 153
Global Peace Index 2.13 2013 4th out of 33
Gulf War Coalition Forces 697,000 1991 1st out of 30
Highest military decorations > Name The Medal of Honor 2014
Imports > USD 904 million 2008 7th out of 86
Manpower > Reaching military age annually > Males 2.19 million 2008 3rd out of 224
Manpower available for military service > Males age 16-49 2013 3rd out of 161
Manpower fit for military service > Males age 16-49 2013 3rd out of 225
Manpower reaching military age annually > Males 2.16 million 2012 5th out of 224
Military branches United States Armed Forces: US Army, US Navy (includes Marine Corps), US Air Force, US Coast Guard 2013
Military expenditure > Current LCU 661.05 billion 2009 13th out of 116
Military expenditures 4.6% of GDP 2010 1st out of 6
Military service age and obligation 18 years of age (17 years of age with parental consent) for male and female voluntary service; no conscription; maximum enlistment age 42 (Army), 27 (Air Force), 34 (Navy), 28 (Marines); service obligation 8 years, including 2-5 years active duty (Army), 2 years active (Navy), 4 years active (Air Force, Marines); DoD is eliminating prohibitions restricting women from assignments in units smaller than brigades or near combat units 2013
NATO > NATO reserves provided 1.46 million 2014 1st out of 26
Navy > Aircraft carriers 10 2011 1st out of 11
Navy > Amphibious warfare ships 30 2011 1st out of 9
Navy > Corvette warships 2 2011 8th out of 10
Navy > Cruisers 22 2011 1st out of 8
Navy > Destroyers 62 2011 1st out of 10
Navy > Frigates 26 2011 3rd out of 11
Navy > Helicopter carriers 9 2014 1st out of 8
Navy > Nuclear submarines 71 2011 1st out of 8
Navy > Submarines 2 2011 8th out of 9
Nuclear weapons > Atmospheric tests 231 2000 1st out of 1
Nuclear weapons > Non-Proliferation treaty sign date 1 Jul 1968 (L, M, W) 2014
Nuclear weapons > Nuclear tests 1,032 2000 1st out of 1
Nuclear weapons > Nuclear warheads 7,700 2014 2nd out of 9
Nuclear weapons > Peaceful use tests 27 2000 1st out of 1
Nuclear weapons > Share of all nuclear tests 48.7% 2000 1st out of 1
Nuclear weapons > Share of all nuclear tests by yield 36.3% 2000 1st out of 1
Nuclear weapons > Test detonations 1,127 2000 1st out of 1
Nuclear weapons > Total yield of all tests 196,513 Kt 2000 1st out of 1
Paramilitary personnel 11,035 2012 1st out of 3
Personnel 1.55 million 2005 3rd out of 160
Personnel > Per capita 5.22 per 1,000 people 2005 70th out of 160
Personnel per 1000 5.23 2005 70th out of 159
Service age and obligation 18 years of age (17 years of age with parental consent) for male and female voluntary service; maximum enlistment age 42 (Army), 27 (Air Force), 34 (Navy), 28 (Marines); service obligation 8 years, including 2-5 years active duty (Army), 2 years active (Navy), 4 years active (Air Force, Marines) 2008
WMD > Missile The United States has the capability to produce highly sophisticated liquid- and solid-fueled missiles of all ranges. It currently deploys 500 Minuteman and 10 MX/Peacekeeper nuclear-tipped intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) at three bases in Montana, North Dakota, and Wyoming. The number of warheads on Minuteman missiles was scheduled to be reduced from three to one by 2007 under the defunct START II agreement, but this plan may be revised to assign between 700 to 800 warheads to the 500 Minutemen missiles. Deactivation of the MX/Peacekeeper force began in October 2002 and will conclude in 2005, at the cost of $600 million. In 2004, the Defense Department retired 17 additional MX/Peacekeeper missiles as part of this plan, and the final 10 MX missiles will be withdrawn from alert status by October 1, 2005. These remaining missiles will not be destroyed as prescribed under START II, but will be retained as stipulated in the 2001 NPR for potential use as space launch vehicles, target vehicles, or for redeployment. The Minuteman missile force is also undergoing a $6.0 billion modernization program to improve the weapon's accuracy, reliability, and to extend its service life beyond 2020. A new, longer-range ICBM, to be ready in 2018, is being considered by the Pentagon. As of early 2005, the U.S. Navy had 14 operational Ohio-class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines (SSBN), having reduced its level by one in 2004 to meet NPR specifications. The four oldest subs in the original class of 18 have been converted to carry non-nuclear cruise missiles. The 14 operational SSBNs carry a total of 336 Trident-1 and Trident-II submarine-launched ballistic missiles (SLBM), each carrying between six and eight warheads, for an estimated total of 2,016. All SSBNs will be modified to carry the Trident II missiles, and the navy has extended the service life of the Trident-II from 30 to 49 years. The Pentagon is planning to introduce a new SSBN in 2029 when the oldest of the current subs will be retired. Previous predictions indicated that the U.S. Navy would station the 14 SSBNs evenly among the Atlantic and Pacific fleets; however, recent planning shifts have called for an SSBN fleet of 9 to be stationed in the Pacific with only 5 submarines in the Atlantic. Also, in 2004, the Navy initiated the Enhanced Effectiveness (E2) Reentry Body Program that would allow missiles to be targeted within 10-meter accuracy, expanding the list of potential targets to be attacked by W76 warheads. Finally, the Navy plans to resume SLBM flight tests in 2005 and plans to develop a submarine-launched intermediate-range ballistic missile (SLIRBM) that would carry nuclear and conventional payloads. The U.S. bomber force consists of 94 B-52 bombers stationed at Barksdale AFB in Louisiana and Minot AFB in North Dakota, and 21 B-2 bombers stationed at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri. The B-52 can deliver air-launched cruise missiles (ALCM), advanced cruise missiles (ACM), or gravity bombs. The B-2 carries only gravity bombs. It is estimated that 450 ALCMs are deployed as well as around 400 operational ACMs, which have a longer range, greater accuracy, and more difficult to intercept than an ALCM. The B-2s are scheduled to undergo upgrades allowing them to make mission and target changes in route. The U.S. Air Force intends to expedite the process of finding a replacement for its current bomber force, considering long- and mid-range options, unmanned aircraft, and new bombers. The United States is a member of the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR), whose goal is to control the transfer of nuclear-capable missiles and unmanned delivery systems capable of carrying all types of WMD. 2029
WMD > Nuclear As one of the five recognized nuclear weapons states under the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the United States maintains a sizeable arsenal of nuclear weapons, including approximately 10,350 intact warheads, 5300 of which are considered active or operational. Approximately 4,530 strategic warheads are operational, 1,150 of which are deployed on land-based missile systems (Minuteman and Peacekeeper ICBMs), 1,050 on bombers (B-52 and B-2), and 2,016 on submarines (Ohio-class subs). 780 are tactical nuclear weapons (TNWs), and consist of an estimated 200 Tomahawk land attack cruise missiles (TLAM/N), and 580 B61 bombs. The remaining warheads are stockpiled. The only remaining U.S. weapons in forward deployment, aside from those on SSBNs, are approximately 480 of the 580 operational B61 bombs, located at eight bases in six European NATO countries. According to the May 2002 Treaty of Moscow (the Strategic Offensive Reductions Treaty, or SORT) between the United States and the Russian Federation, both countries are required to reduce their strategic nuclear arsenals to 1,700-2,200 operationally deployed warheads by 2012. In June 2004, the US Department of Energy announced that "almost half" of these warheads would be retired for dismantlement by 2012. This statement suggests that the total stockpile of 10,350 warheards would be reduced to about 6,000 by this date. Over 5,000 warheads have been removed from deployment by the United States and placed in a "responsive reserve force" (active but not deployed or in overhaul). These "spares," or warheads on inactive status, have not been dismantled, in keeping with past practice under previous U.S. arms control agreements. The Bush administration has rejected U.S. ratification of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, but calls for a continued moratorium on nuclear testing. The NPR calls for a reduction in the amount of time needed (now 18 months as mandated by Congress, but this could be reduced to as little as 12 months) to test a nuclear weapon, suggesting that the United States might decide to resume nuclear testing, although Bush administration officials deny that this is currently planned and explain the shortening of test-site readiness time as a logical extension of the U.S. decision to maintain a testing option. The NPR also calls for discussion on possible development of new, low-yield, bunker-busting TNW. A law barring research and development that could lead to the production by the United States of a new low-yield "bunker buster" nuclear weapon (warheads with a yield of 5 kilotons or less) was passed by Congress in 1994. In its FY2004 budget request, however, the Department of Defense requested a repeal of the 1994 law, suggesting that the U.S. government intends to proceed with development of new nuclear weapons. The repeal was approved by the Senate on 20 May 2003. The Bush administration has requested an additional $8.5 million in its 2006 budget in order to continue research of nuclear "bunker busters" under the Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator (RNEP) Project. Congress rejected RNEP funding and resources for the Advanced Concepts Initiative, one that would develop mini-nukes or exotic designs, completely for FY2005. Weapons laboratories under the Department of Energy began research on the RNEP Project in 2003, and the study is expected to be complete in 2006. The United States used nuclear weapons on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945, making it the only country that has ever used nuclear weapons during a conflict. It ratified the NPT in March 1970. 2012
War deaths 0.0 2008 73th out of 195
Weapon holdings 38.54 million 2001 1st out of 137
Weapons of mass destruction > Chemical Weapons Convention ratification April 25, 1997 2014
Weapons of mass destruction > Chemical weapons possession Known 2014

SOURCES: Wikipedia: List of aircraft carriers in service (List of countries by aircraft carriers); Wikipedia: List of aircraft carriers by country (Number of aircraft carriers by operating nation); Wikipedia: List of countries by level of military equipment (Combat aircraft by country); Wikipedia: List of countries by level of military equipment (List); calculated on the basis of data on armed forces from IISS (International Institute for Strategic Studies). 2001. The Military Balance 2001-2002. Oxford: Oxford University Press; IISS (International Institute for Strategic Studies). 2001. The Military Balance 2001-2002. Oxford: Oxford University Press; International Institute for Strategic Studies, The Military Balance.; IISS (International Institute for Strategic Studies). 2001. The Military Balance 2001-2002. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arms_industry#World.27s_largest_arms_exporters

Stockholm International Peace Research Institute
; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arms_industry#World.27s_largest_arms_exporters

Stockholm International Peace Research Institute
. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arms_industry#World.27s_largest_arms_importers
http://www.sipri.org/googlemaps/2013_of_at_top_20_imp_map.html
, The Top 20 Arms Importers, 2008 –2012; Uppsala Conflict Data Program, http://www.pcr.uu.se/research/UCDP/.; Uppsala Conflict Data Program, http://www.pcr.uu.se/research/UCDP/. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; All CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 18 December 2008; Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Geneva, Switzerland, 1997. Data collected from the nations concerned, unless otherwise indicated. Acronyms: Amnesty International (AI); European Council of Conscripts Organizations (ECCO); Friends World Committee for Consultation (FWCC); International Helsinki Federation for Human Rights (IHFHR); National Interreligious Service Board for Conscientious Objectors (NISBCO); Service, Peace and Justice in Latin America (SERPAJ); War Resisters International (WRI); World Council of Churches (WCC); Stockholm International Peace Research Institute: The SIPRI Military Expenditure Database; World Development Indicators database; http://www.visionofhumanity.org/#/page/indexes/global-peace-index, Global Rankings. Vision of Humanity.; "Gulf War Veterans: Measuring Health" by Lyla M. Hernandez, Jane S. Durch, Dan G. Blazer II, and Isabel V. Hoverman, Editors; Committee on Measuring the Health of Gulf War Veterans, Institute of Medicine. Published by The National Academies Press 1999; Wikipedia: List of highest military decorations; Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), Yearbook: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security.; CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; CIA World Factbooks 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013; Wikipedia: Member states of NATO (Military personnel); Wikipedia: Helicopter carrier (Helicopter carriers by country); Wikipedia: Worldwide nuclear testing counts and summary (Worldwide nuclear testing totals by country) (Defined as these classes of tests: atmospheric, surface, barge, cratering, space, and underwater tests.); Wikipedia: List of parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (Ratified or acceded states); Wikipedia: Worldwide nuclear testing counts and summary (Worldwide nuclear testing totals by country) (Including salvo tests counted as a single test.); http://www.fas.org/programs/ssp/nukes/nuclearweapons/nukestatus.html, April 2014; Wikipedia: Worldwide nuclear testing counts and summary (Worldwide nuclear testing totals by country) (As declared so by the nation testing; some may have been dual use.); Wikipedia: Worldwide nuclear testing counts and summary (Worldwide nuclear testing totals by country); Wikipedia: Worldwide nuclear testing counts and summary (Worldwide nuclear testing totals by country) (Detonations include zero-yield detonations in safety tests and failed full yield tests, but not those in the accident category listed above.); Wikipedia: List of countries by number of military and paramilitary personnel (The list); World Development Indicators database. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; The Nuclear Threat Initiative; Uppsala Conflict Data Program, http://www.pcr.uu.se/research/ucdp/.; Bonn International Center for Conversion (BICC); Wikipedia: Chemical weapon proliferation; Wikipedia: Chemical warfare (Efforts to eradicate chemical weapons)

Citation

"United States Military Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/United-States/Military/All-stats

Did you know

  • United States ranked first for manpower fit for military service > males age 16-49 amongst Christian countries in 2013.

0

My dad is in the Army, he is a Master Sergeant. It is really hard sometimes. I can hear my mum crying at night times when he first gets deployed. That is the hardest thing. When dad comes home it is always the best feeling in the world. The thing with peaks, they have to end. He gets deployed again and he is gone again for two or so years. The longest one was thirty two months. That was when I was ten. The Army are very helpful and have family programs and gatherings to help the troops' families because it can be a hard time. I think what the Army do is incredibly brave and deserves every single shread of respect they get. I think all these vulgar comments about toy soldiers on battlefields is incredibly disrespectful and I do not know one Sergeant who would appreciate that. It isn't a game. These are lives. They are not there to fight, they're there to protect. They do not go to Iraq or Afghanistan to kill. Sadly, there are losses on both sides. I can tell you no one feels good about those.

Posted on 14 Jun 2011

Holly

Holly

0

Seriously, the US needs to quit focusing on its military and needs to start focusing on education and science.

We may have to colonize other planets soon, I mean, we will! We're running out of land here on Earth, at a rapid pace.

Fighting other countries is just fighting over something that will one day run out anyway, its quite stupid in my opinion.

Posted on 03 Oct 2010

Ryan

Ryan

0

Strongest military ever produced, as well at the most capable. Not only in defense of our own shores but in the defense of others. We provide protection on the seas for the sake of free trade for all. Superior long range stealth bombers and stealth fighters second to none. Most powerful army backed by hundreds of billions of dollars annually and an all volunteer force since 1972. We sell more arms, give more aid, and feed more hungry than any state. AMERICA.

Posted on 28 Sep 2010

Callahan

Callahan

0

US is in a decline its sure.We are spending money we dont have and we are in bad economic state.

Military chart to stats:
1:USA
2:China
3:Russia
4:India
5:UK

Posted on 16 Feb 2010

Detached Observer.

Detached Observer.