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Government > National anthem > Note: Countries Compared

COUNTRY DESCRIPTION
Afghanistan adopted 2006; the 2004 constitution of the post-Taliban government mandated that a new national anthem should be written containing the phrase "Allahu Akbar" (God is Great) and mentioning the names of Afghanistan's ethnic groups
Akrotiri as a United Kingdom area of special sovereignty, "God Save the Queen" is official (see United Kingdom)
Albania adopted 1912
Algeria adopted 1962; ZAKARIAH wrote "Kassaman" as a poem while imprisoned in Algiers by French colonial forces
American Samoa local anthem adopted 1950; as a territory of the United States, "The Star-Spangled Banner" is official (see United States)
Andorra adopted 1921; the anthem provides a brief history of Andorra in a first person narrative
Angola adopted 1975
Anguilla local anthem adopted 1981; as a territory of the United Kingdom, "God Save the Queen" is official (see United Kingdom)
Antigua and Barbuda adopted 1967; as a Commonwealth country, in addition to the national anthem, "God Save the Queen" serves as the royal anthem (see United Kingdom)
Argentina adopted 1813; Vicente LOPEZ was inspired to write the anthem after watching a play about the 1810 May Revolution against Spain
Armenia adopted 1991; based on the anthem of the Democratic Republic of Armenia (1918-1922) but with different lyrics
Aruba local anthem adopted 1986; as part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, "Het Wilhelmus" is official (see Netherlands)
Australia adopted 1984; although originally written in the late 19th century, the anthem did not become official until 1984; as a Commonwealth country, in addition to the national anthem, "God Save the Queen" serves as the royal anthem (see United Kingdom)
Austria adopted 1947; the anthem is also known as "Land der Berge, Land am Strome" (Land of the Mountains, Land on the River); Austria adopted a new national anthem after World War II to replace the former imperial anthem composed by Franz Josef HAYDN, which had been appropriated by Germany in 1922 and was now associated with the Nazi regime
Azerbaijan adopted 1992; although originally written in 1919 during a brief period of independence, "Azerbaijan Marsi" did not become the official anthem until after the dissolution of the Soviet Union
Bahrain adopted 1971; although Mohamed Sudqi AYYASH wrote the original lyrics, they were changed in 2002 following the transformation of Bahrain from an emirate to a kingdom
Bangladesh adopted 1971; Rabindranath TAGORE, a Nobel laureate, also wrote India's national anthem
Barbados adopted 1966; the anthem is also known as "In Plenty and In Time of Need"
Belarus music adopted 1955, lyrics adopted 2002; after the fall of the Soviet Union, Belarus kept the music of its Soviet-era anthem but adopted new lyrics; also known as "Dziarzauny himn Respubliki Bielarus" (State Anthem of the Republic of Belarus)
Belgium adopted 1830; Louis-Alexandre DECHET was an actor at the theater in which the revolution against the Netherlands began; according to legend, he wrote the lyrics with a group of young people in a Brussels cafe
Belize adopted 1981; as a Commonwealth country, in addition to the national anthem, "God Save the Queen" serves as the royal anthem (see United Kingdom)
Benin adopted 1960
Bermuda serves as a local anthem; as a territory of the United Kingdom, "God Save the Queen" is official (see United Kingdom)
Bhutan adopted 1953
Bolivia adopted 1852
Bosnia and Herzegovina music adopted 1999; lyrics adopted 2009
Botswana adopted 1966
Brazil music adopted 1890, lyrics adopted 1922; the anthem's music, composed in 1822, was used unofficially for many years before it was adopted
British Virgin Islands as a territory of the United Kingdom, "God Save the Queen" is official (see United Kingdom)
Brunei adopted 1951
Bulgaria adopted 1964; the anthem was composed in 1885 by a student en route to fight in the Serbo-Bulgarian War
Burkina Faso adopted 1974; also known as "Une Seule Nuit" (One Single Night), Burkina Faso"s anthem was written by the country"s president, an avid guitar player
Burma adopted 1948; Burma is among a handful of non-European nations that have anthems rooted in indigenous traditions; the beginning portion of the anthem is a traditional Burmese anthem before transitioning into a Western-style orchestrated work
Burundi adopted 1962
Cambodia adopted 1941, restored 1993; the anthem, based on a Cambodian folk tune, was restored after the defeat of the Communist regime
Cameroon adopted 1957; Cameroon's anthem, also known as "Chant de Ralliement" (The Rallying Song), has been used unofficially since 1948 although officially adopted in 1957; the anthem has French and English versions whose lyrics differ
Canada adopted 1980; originally written in 1880, "O Canada" served as an unofficial anthem many years before its official adoption; the anthem has French and English versions whose lyrics differ; as a Commonwealth realm, in addition to the national anthem, "God Save the Queen" serves as the royal anthem (see United Kingdom)
Cape Verde adopted 1996
Cayman Islands adopted 1993; served as an unofficial anthem since 1930; as a territory of the United Kingdom, in addition to the local anthem, "God Save the Queen" is official (see United Kingdom)
Central African Republic adopted 1960; Barthelemy BOGANDA, who wrote the anthem's lyrics, was the first prime minister of the autonomous French territory
Chad adopted 1960
Chile music adopted 1828, original lyrics adopted 1818, adapted lyrics adopted 1847; under Augusto PINOCHET"s military rule, a verse glorifying the army was added; however, as a protest, some citizens refused to sing this verse; it was removed when democracy was restored in 1990
China adopted 1949; the anthem, though banned during the Cultural Revolution, is more commonly known as "Zhongguo Guoge" (Chinese National Song); it was originally the theme song to the 1935 Chinese movie, "Sons and Daughters in a Time of Storm"
Christmas Island as a territory of Australia, "Advance Australia Fair" remains official as the national anthem, while "God Save the Queen" serves as the royal anthem (see Australia)
Cocos (Keeling) Islands as a territory of Australia, "Advance Australia Fair" remains official as the national anthem, while "God Save the Queen" serves as the royal anthem (see Australia)
Colombia adopted 1920; the anthem was created from an inspirational poem written by President Rafael NUNEZ
Comoros adopted 1978
Congo, Republic of the originally adopted 1959, restored 1991
Cook Islands adopted 1982; as prime minister, Sir Thomas DAVIS composed the anthem; his wife, a tribal chief, wrote the lyrics
Costa Rica adopted 1949; the anthem's music was originally written for an 1853 welcome ceremony for diplomatic missions from the United States and United Kingdom; the lyrics were added in 1903
Cote d'Ivoire adopted 1960; although the nation's capital city moved from Abidjan to Yamoussoukro in 1983, the anthem still owes its name to the former capital
Croatia adopted 1972; "Lijepa nasa domovino," whose lyrics were written in 1835, served as an unofficial anthem beginning in 1891
Cuba adopted 1940; Pedro FIGUEREDO first performed "La Bayamesa" in 1868 during the Ten Years War against the Spanish; a leading figure in the uprising, FIGUEREDO was captured in 1870 and executed in front of a firing squad; just prior to the fusillade he is reputed to have shouted, "Morir por la Patria es vivir" (To die for the country is to live), a line from the anthem
Cyprus adopted 1960; Cyprus adopted the Greek national anthem as its own; the Turkish community in Cyprus uses the anthem of Turkey
Czech Republic adopted 1993; the anthem is a verse from the former Czechoslovak anthem originally written as part of the opera "Fidlovacka"
Democratic Republic of the Congo adopted 1960; the anthem was replaced during the period in which the country was known as Zaire, but was readopted in 1997
Denmark Denmark has two national anthems with equal status; "Der er et yndigt land," adopted 1844, is a national anthem, while "Kong Christian," adopted 1780, serves as both a national and royal anthem; "Kong Christian" is also known as "Kong Christian stod ved hojen mast" (King Christian Stood by the Lofty Mast) and "Kongesangen" (The King's Anthem); within Denmark, the royal anthem is played only when royalty is present and is usually followed by the national anthem; when royalty is not present, only the national anthem is performed; outside Denmark, the royal anthem is played, unless the national anthem is requested
Dhekelia as a United Kingdom area of special sovereignty,"God Save the Queen" is official (see United Kingdom)
Djibouti adopted 1977
Dominica adopted 1967
Dominican Republic adopted 1934; also known as "Quisqueyanos valientes" (Valient Sons of Quisqueye); the anthem never refers to the people as Dominican but rather calls them "Quisqueyanos," a reference to the indigenous name of the island
East Timor adopted 2002; the song was first used as an anthem when Timor-Leste declared its independence from Portugal in 1975; the lyricist, Fransisco Borja DA COSTA, was killed in an Indonesian invasion just days after independence was declared
Ecuador adopted 1948; Juan Leon MERA wrote the lyrics in 1865; only the chorus and second verse are sung
Egypt adopted 1979; after the signing of the 1979 peace with Israel, Egypt sought to create an anthem less militaristic than its previous one; Sayed DARWISH, commonly considered the father of modern Egyptian music, composed the anthem
El Salvador officially adopted 1953, in use since 1879; the anthem of El Salvador is one of the world's longest
Equatorial Guinea adopted 1968
Eritrea adopted 1993; upon independence from Ethiopia in 1993, Eritrea adopted its own national anthem
Estonia adopted 1920, though banned between 1940 and 1990 under Soviet occupation; the anthem, used in Estonia since 1869, shares the same melody with that of Finland but has different lyrics
Ethiopia adopted 1992
European Union adopted 1972, not in use until 1986; according to the European Union, the song is meant to represent all of Europe rather than just the organization; the song also serves as the anthem for the Council of Europe
Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas) adopted 1930s; the song is the local unofficial anthem; as a territory of the United Kingdom, "God Save the Queen" is official (see United Kingdom)
Faroe Islands adopted 1948; the anthem is also known as "Tu alfagra land mitt" (Thou Fairest Land of Mine); as an autonomous overseas division of Denmark, the Faroe Islands are permitted their own national anthem
Federated States of Micronesia adopted 1991; the anthem is also known as "Across All Micronesia;" the music is based on the 1820 German patriotic song "Ich hab mich ergeben," which was the West German national anthem from 1949-1950; variants of this tune are used in Johannes Brahms' "Festival Overture" and Gustav Mahler's "Third Symphony"
Fiji adopted 1970; the anthem is known in Fijian as "Meda Dau Doka" (Let Us Show Pride); adapted from the hymn, "Dwelling in Beulah Land," the anthem's English lyrics are generally sung, although they differ in meaning from the official Fijian lyrics
Finland in use since 1848; although never officially adopted by law, the anthem has been popular since it was first sung by a student group in 1848; Estonia's anthem uses the same melody as that of Finland
France adopted 1795, restored 1870; originally known as "Chant de Guerre pour l'Armee du Rhin" (War Song for the Army of the Rhine), the National Guard of Marseille made the song famous by singing it while marching into Paris in 1792 during the French Revolutionary Wars
French Polynesia adopted 1993; serves as a local anthem; as a territory of France, "La Marseillaise" is official (see France)
French Southern and Antarctic Lands as a territory of France, "La Marseillaise" is official (see France)
Gabon adopted 1960
Georgia adopted 2004; after the Rose Revolution, a new anthem with music based on the operas "Abesalom da Eteri" and "Daisi" was adopted
Germany adopted 1922, restored 1990; the anthem, also known as "Deutschlandlied" (Song of Germany), was abolished in 1945 because of the Nazi's use of the first verse, specifically the phrase, "Deutschland, Deutschland uber alles" (Germany, Germany above all) to promote nationalism; since restoration in 1990, only the third verse is sung
Ghana music adopted 1957, lyrics adopted 1966; the lyrics were changed twice, once when a republic was declared in 1960 and again after a 1966 coup
Gibraltar adopted 1994; serves as a local anthem; as a territory of the United Kingdom, "God Save the Queen" remains official (see United Kingdom)
Greece adopted 1864; the anthem is based on a 158 verse poem by the same name, which was inspired by the Greek Revolution of 1821 against the Ottomans; Cyprus also uses "Hymn to Liberty" as its anthem
Greenland adopted 1916; the government also recognizes "Nuna asiilasooq" as a secondary anthem
Grenada adopted 1974
Guam adopted 1919; the local anthem is also known as "Guam Hymn"; as a territory of the United States, "The Star-Spangled Banner," which generally follows the playing of "Stand Ye Guamanians," is official (see United States)
Guatemala adopted 1897, modified lyrics adopted 1934; Cuban poet Jose Joaquin PALMA anonymously submitted lyrics to a public contest calling for a national anthem; his authorship was not discovered until 1911
Guernsey adopted 1911; serves as a local anthem; as a British crown dependency, "God Save the Queen" remains official (see United Kingdom)
Guinea adopted 1958
Guinea-Bissau adopted 1974; a delegation from Portuguese Guinea visited China in 1963 and heard music by XIAO He; Amilcar Lopes CABRA, the leader of Guinea-Bissa"s independence movement, asked the composer to create a piece that would inspire his people to struggle for independence
Guyana adopted 1966
Haiti adopted 1904; the anthem is named for Jean-Jacques DESSALINES, a leader in the Haitian Revolution and first ruler of an independent Haiti
Holy See (Vatican City) adopted 1950; although used as such, "Inno e Marcia Pontificale" is not officially a national anthem but rather a hymn meant to appeal to Roman Catholics throughout the world
Honduras adopted 1915; the anthem's seven verses chronicle Honduran history; on official occasions, only the chorus and last verse are sung
Hong Kong as a Special Administrative Region of China, "Yiyonggjun Jinxingqu" is official (see China)
Hungary adopted 1844; the anthem is also known as "Isten, aldd meg a magyart" (God, Bless the Hungarians)
Iceland adopted 1944; the anthem, also known as "O, Guo vors Lands" (O, God of Our Land), was originally written and performed in 1874
India adopted 1950; Rabindranath TAGORE, a Nobel laureate, also wrote Bangladesh's national anthem
Indonesia adopted 1945
Iran adopted 1990
Iraq adopted 2004; following the ousting of Saddam HUSSEIN, Iraq adopted "Mawtini," a popular folk song throughout the Arab world, which also serves as an unofficial anthem of the Palestinian people
Ireland adopted 1926; instead of "Amhran na bhFiann," the song "Ireland's Call" is often used in athletic events where citizens of the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland compete as a unified team
Israel adopted 2004, unofficial since 1948; used as the anthem of the Zionist movement since 1897; the 1888 arrangement by Shmuel COHEN is thought to be based on the Romanian folk song "Carul cu boi" (The Ox Driven Cart)
Italy adopted 1946; the anthem, originally written in 1847, is also known as "L'Inno di Mameli" (Mameli's Hymn), and "Fratelli D'Italia" (Brothers of Italy)
Jamaica adopted 1962
Japan adopted 1999; in use as unofficial national anthem since 1883; oldest anthem lyrics in the world, dating to the 10th century or earlier; there is some opposition to the anthem because of its association with militarism and worship of the emperor
Jersey adopted 2008; serves as a local anthem; as a British crown dependency, "God Save the Queen" is official (see United Kingdom)
Jordan adopted 1946; the shortened version of the anthem is used most commonly, while the full version is reserved for special occasions
Kazakhstan adopted 2006; President Nursultan NAZARBAYEV played a role in revising the lyrics
Kenya adopted 1963; the anthem is based on a traditional Kenyan folk song
Kiribati adopted 1979
Kuwait adopted 1978; the anthem is only used on formal occasions
Kyrgyzstan adopted 1992
Laos music adopted 1945, lyrics adopted 1975; the anthem's lyrics were changed following the 1975 Communist revolution that overthrew the monarchy
Latvia adopted 1920, restored 1990; the song was first performed in 1873 while Latvia was a part of Russia; the anthem was banned during the Soviet occupation from 1940 to 1990
Lebanon adopted 1927; the anthem was chosen following a nationwide competition
Lesotho adopted 1967; the anthem's music derives from an 1823 Swiss songbook
Liberia lyrics adopted 1847, music adopted 1860; the anthem's author would become the third president of Liberia
Libya adopted 1969; the anthem was originally a battle song for the Egyptian Army in the 1956 Suez War
Liechtenstein adopted 1850, revised 1963; the anthem uses the tune of "God Save the Queen"
Lithuania adopted 1918, restored 1990; the anthem was written in 1898 while Lithuania was a part of Russia; it was banned during the Soviet occupation from 1940 to 1990
Luxembourg "Ons Heemecht," adopted 1864, is the national anthem, while "De Wilhelmus," adopted 1919, serves as a royal anthem for use when members of the grand ducal family enter or exit a ceremony in Luxembourg
Macau as a Special Administrative Region of China, "Yiyonggjun Jinxingqu" is official (see China)
Madagascar adopted 1959
Malawi adopted 1964
Malaysia adopted 1957; the full version is only performed in the presence of the king; the tune, which was adopted from a popular French melody titled "La Rosalie," was originally the anthem of the state of Perak
Maldives lyrics adopted 1948, music adopted 1972; between 1948 and 1972, the lyrics were sung to the tune of "Auld Lang Syne"
Mali adopted 1962; the anthem is also known as "Pour L'Afrique et pour toi, Mali" (For Africa and for You, Mali) and "A ton appel Mali" (At Your Call, Mali)
Malta adopted 1945; the anthem is written in the form of a prayer
Marshall Islands adopted 1981
Mauritania adopted 1960; the unique rhythm of the Mauritanian anthem makes it particularly challenging to sing
Mauritius adopted 1968
Mayotte as an overseas collectivity of France, "La Marseillaise" is official (see France)
Mexico adopted 1943, in use since 1854; the anthem is also known as "Mexicanos, al grito de Guerra" (Mexicans, to the War Cry); according to tradition, Francisco Gonzalez BOCANEGRA, an accomplished poet, was uninterested in submitting lyrics to a national anthem contest; his fiancee locked him in a room and refused to release him until the lyrics were completed
Moldova adopted 1994
Monaco music adopted 1867, lyrics adopted 1931; although French is much more commonly spoken, only the Monegasque lyrics are official; the French version is known as "Hymne Monegasque" (Monegasque Anthem); the words are generally only sung on official occasions
Mongolia music adopted 1950, lyrics adopted 2006; the anthem's lyrics have been altered on numerous occasions
Montserrat as a territory of the United Kingdom, "God Save the Queen" is official (see United Kingdom)
Morocco music adopted 1956, lyrics adopted 1970
Mozambique adopted 2002
Namibia adopted 1991
Nauru adopted 1968
Nepal adopted 2007; after the abolition of the monarchy in 2006, a new anthem was required because of the previous anthem's praise for the king
Netherlands adopted 1932, in use since the 17th century, making it the oldest national anthem in the world; also known as "Wilhelmus van Nassouwe" (William of Nassau), it is in the form of an acrostic, where the first letter of each stanza spells the name of the leader of the Dutch Revolt
New Caledonia adopted 2008; the anthem contains a mixture of lyrics in both French and Nengone (an indigenous language); as a self-governing territory of France, in addition to the local anthem, "La Marseillaise" is official (see France)
New Zealand adopted 1940 as national song, adopted 1977 as co-national anthem; New Zealand has two national anthems with equal status; as a commonwealth realm, in addition to "God Defend New Zealand," "God Save the Queen" serves as a national anthem (see United Kingdom); "God Save the Queen" normally is played only when a member of the royal family or the governor-general is present; in all other cases, "God Defend New Zealand" is played
Nicaragua although only officially adopted in 1971, the music was approved in 1918 and the lyrics in 1939; the tune, originally from Spain, was used as an anthem for Nicaragua from the 1830"s until 1876
Niger adopted 1961
Nigeria adopted 1978; the lyrics are a mixture of five of the top entries in a national contest
Niue adopted 1974
North Korea adopted 1947; both North Korea and South Korea's anthems share the same name and have a vaguely similar melody but have different lyrics; the North Korean anthem is also known as "Ach'imun pinnara" (Let Morning Shine)
Northern Mariana Islands adopted 1996; the Carolinian version of the song is known as "Satil Matawal Pacifico;" as a commonwealth of the United States, in addition to the local anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner" is official (see United States)
Norway adopted 1864; in addition to the national anthem, "Kongesangen" (Song of the King), which uses the tune of "God Save the Queen," serves as the royal anthem
Oman adopted 1932; new words were written after QABOOS bin Said al Said gained power in 1970; the anthem was first performed by the band of a British ship as a salute to the Sultan during a 1932 visit to Muscat; the bandmaster of the HMS Hawkins was asked to write a salutation to the Sultan on the occasion of his visiting the ship
Pakistan adopted 1954; the anthem is also known as "Pak sarzamin shad bad" (Blessed Be the Sacred Land)
Palau adopted 1980
Panama adopted 1925
Papua New Guinea adopted 1975
Paraguay adopted 1934, in use since 1846; the anthem was officially adopted following its re-arrangement in 1934
Peru adopted 1822; the song won a national contest for an anthem
Philippines music adopted 1898, original Spanish lyrics adopted 1899, Filipino (Tagalog) lyrics adopted 1956; although the original lyrics were written in Spanish, later English and Filipino versions were created; today, only the Filipino version is used
Pitcairn Islands serves as a local anthem; as a territory of the United Kingdom, "God Save the Queen" is official (see United Kingdom)
Poland adopted 1927; the anthem, commonly known as "Jeszcze Polska nie zginela" (Poland Has Not Yet Perished), was written in 1797; the lyrics resonate strongly with Poles because they reflect the numerous occasions in which the nation's lands have been occupied
Portugal adopted 1910; "A Portuguesa" was originally written to protest the Portuguese monarchy's acquiescence to the 1890 British ultimatum forcing Portugal to give up areas of Africa; the lyrics refer to the "insult" that resulted from the event
Puerto Rico music adopted 1952, lyrics adopted 1977; the local anthem's name is a reference to the indigenous name of the island, Borinquen; the music was originally composed as a dance in 1867 and gained popularity in the early 20th century; there is some evidence that the music was written by Francisco RAMIREZ; as a commonwealth of the United States, "The Star-Spangled Banner" is official (see United States)
Qatar adopted 1996; the anthem was first performed that year at a meeting of the Gulf Cooperative Council hosted by Qatar
Romania adopted 1990; the anthem was written during the 1848 Revolution
Russia in 2000, Russia adopted the tune of the anthem of the former Soviet Union (composed in 1939); the lyrics, also adopted in 2000, were written by the same person who authored the Soviet lyrics in 1943
Rwanda adopted 2001
Saint Barthelemy local anthem in use since 1999; as a collectivity of France, "La Marseillaise" is official (see France)
Saint Kitts and Nevis adopted 1983
Saint Lucia adopted 1967
Saint Martin the song, written in 1958, is used as an unofficial anthem for the entire island (both French and Dutch sides); as a collectivity of France, in addition to the local anthem, "La Marseillaise" remains official on the French side (see France); as a constituent part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, in addition to the local anthem, "Het Wilhelmus" remains official on the Dutch side (see Netherlands)
Saint Pierre and Miquelon as a collectivity of France, "La Marseillaise" is official (see France)
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines adopted 1967
Samoa adopted 1962; the anthem is also known as "Samoa Tula'i" (Samoa Arise)
San Marino adopted 1894; the music for the lyric-less anthem is based on a 10th century chorale piece
Sao Tome and Principe adopted 1975
Saudi Arabia music adopted 1947, lyrics adopted 1984
Senegal adopted 1960; the lyrics were written by Leopold Sedar SENGHOR, Senegal"s first president; the anthem is sometimes played incorporating the Koras (harp-like stringed instruments) and Balafons (types of xylophones) mentioned in the title
Serbia and Montenegro adopted 1904; the song was originally written as part of a play in 1872 and has been used as an anthem by the Serbian people throughout the 20th and 21st centuries
Seychelles adopted 1996
Sierra Leone adopted 1961
Singapore adopted 1965; the anthem, which was first performed in 1958 at the Victoria Theatre, is sung only in Malay
Slovakia adopted 1993, in use since 1844; the anthem"s music is based on the Slovak folk song "Kopala studienku"
Slovenia adopted 1989; the anthem was originally written in 1848; the full poem, whose seventh verse is used as the anthem, speaks of pan-Slavic nationalism
Solomon Islands adopted 1978
Somalia adopted 2000; written in 1947, the lyrics speak of creating unity and an end to fighting
South Africa adopted 1994; the anthem is a combination of "N'kosi Sikelel' iAfrica" (God Bless Africa) and "Die Stem van Suid Afrika" (The Call of South Africa), which were respectively the anthems of the non-white and white communities under apartheid; the official lyrics contain a mixture of Xhosa, Zulu, Sesotho, Afrikaans, and English; the music incorporates the melody used in the Tanzanian and Zambian anthems
South Korea adopted 1948, well known by 1910; both North Korea and South Korea's anthems share the same name and have a vaguely similar melody but have different lyrics
Spain officially in use between 1770 and 1931, restored in 1939; the Spanish anthem has no lyrics; in the years prior to 1931 it became known as "Marcha Real" (The Royal March); it first appeared in a 1761 military bugle call book and was replaced by "Himno de Riego" in the years between 1931 and 1939; the long version of the anthem is used for the king, while the short version is used for the prince, prime minister, and occasions such as sporting events
Sri Lanka adopted 1951
Sudan adopted 1956; the song originally served as the anthem of the Sudanese military
Suriname adopted 1959; the anthem, originally adapted from a Sunday school song written in 1893, contains lyrics in both Dutch and Sranan Tongo
Svalbard as a territory of Norway, "Ja, vi elsker dette landet" is official (see Norway)
Swaziland adopted 1968; the anthem uses elements of both ethnic Swazi and Western music styles
Sweden in use since 1844; the anthem, also known as "Sang till Norden" (Song of the North), is based on a Swedish folk tune; it has never been officially adopted by the government; "Kungssangen" (The King's Song) serves as the royal anthem and is played in the presence of the royal family and during certain state ceremonies
Switzerland unofficially adopted 1961, official adoption 1981; the anthem has been popular in a number of Swiss cantons since its composition (in German) in 1841; translated into the other three official languages of the country (French, Italian, and Romansch), it is official in each of those languages
Syria adopted 1936, restored 1961; between 1958 and 1961, while Syria was a member of the United Arab Republic with Egypt, the country had a different anthem
Taiwan adopted 1930; the anthem is also the song of the Kuomintang Party; it is informally known as "San Min Chu I" or "San Min Zhu Yi" (Three Principles of the People); because of political pressure from China, "Guo Qi Ge" (National Banner Song) is used at international events rather than the official anthem of Taiwan; the "National Banner Song" has gained popularity in Taiwan and is commonly used during flag raisings
Tajikistan adopted 1991; after the fall of the Soviet Union, Tajikistan kept the music of the anthem from its time as a Soviet republic but adopted new lyrics
Tanzania adopted 1961; the anthem, which is also a popular song in Africa, shares the same melody with that of Zambia, but has different lyrics; the melody is also incorporated into South Africa's anthem
Thailand music adopted 1932, lyrics adopted 1939; by law, people are required to stand for the national anthem at 0800 and 1800 every day; the anthem is played in schools, offices, theaters, and on television and radio during this time; "Phleng Sansasoen Phra Barami" (A Salute to the Monarch) serves as the royal anthem and is played in the presence of the royal family and during certain state ceremonies
The Bahamas adopted 1973; as a Commonwealth country, in addition to the national anthem, "God Save the Queen" serves as the royal anthem (see United Kingdom)
The Gambia adopted 1965; the music is an adaptation of the traditional Mandinka song "Foday Kaba Dumbuya"
Togo adopted 1960, restored 1992; this anthem was replaced by another during one-party rule between 1979 and 1992
Tokelau adopted 2008; in preparation for eventual self governance, Tokelau held a national contest to choose an anthem; as a territory of New Zealand, "God Defend New Zealand" and "God Save the Queen" are official (see New Zealand)
Tonga in use since 1875; the anthem is more commonly known as "Fasi Fakafonua" (National Song)
Trinidad and Tobago adopted 1962; the song was originally created to serve as an anthem for the West Indies Federation; it was adopted by Trinidad and Tobago following the Federation's dissolution in 1962
Tunisia adopted 1957, replaced 1958, restored 1987; Mohamad Abdel WAHAB also composed the music for the anthem of the United Arab Emirates
Turkey lyrics adopted 1921, music adopted 1932; the anthem's original music was adopted in 1924; a new composition was agreed upon in 1932
Turkmenistan adopted 1997, lyrics revised 2008; following the death of the President Saparmurat NYYAZOW, the lyrics were altered to eliminate references to the former president
Turks and Caicos Islands serves as a local anthem; as a territory of the United Kingdom, "God Save the Queen" is the official anthem (see United Kingdom)
Tuvalu adopted 1978; the anthem's name is also the nation's motto
Uganda adopted 1962
Ukraine music adopted 1991, lyrics adopted 2003; the song was first performed in 1864 at the Ukraine Theatre in Lviv; the lyrics, originally written in 1862, were revised in 2003
United Arab Emirates music adopted 1971, lyrics adopted 1996; Mohamad Abdel WAHAB also composed the music for the anthem of Tunisia
United Kingdom in use since 1745; by tradition, the song serves as both the national and royal anthem of the United Kingdom; it is known as either "God Save the Queen" or "God Save the King," depending on the gender of the reigning monarch; it also serves as the royal anthem of many Commonwealth nations
United States adopted 1931; during the War of 1812, after witnessing the successful American defense of Fort McHenry in Baltimore following British naval bombardment, Francis Scott KEY wrote the lyrics to what would become the national anthem; the lyrics were set to the tune of "The Anacreontic Song;" only the first verse is sung
Uruguay adopted 1848; the anthem is also known as "Orientales, la Patria o la tumba!" ("Uruguayans, the Fatherland or Death!"); it is the world's longest national anthem in terms of music (105 bars; almost five minutes); generally only the first verse and chorus are sung
Uzbekistan adopted 1992; after the fall of the Soviet Union, Uzbekistan kept the music of the anthem from its time as a Soviet Republic but adopted new lyrics
Vanuatu adopted 1980, the anthem is written in Bislama, a Creole language that mixes Pidgin English and French
Venezuela adopted 1881; the lyrics were written in 1810, the music some years later; both SALIAS and LANDAETA were executed in 1814 during Venezuela's struggle for independence
Vietnam adopted as the national anthem of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam in 1945; it became the national anthem of the unified Socialist Republic of Vietnam in 1976; although it consists of two verses, only the first is used as the official anthem
Virgin Islands adopted 1963; serves as a local anthem; as a territory of the United States, "The Star-Spangled Banner" is official (see United States)
Wallis and Futuna as a territory of France, "La Marseillaise" is official (see France)
Yemen adopted 1990; the music first served as the anthem for South Yemen before unification with North Yemen in 1990
Zambia adopted 1964; the melody, from the popular song "God Bless Africa," is the same as that of Tanzania but with different lyrics; the melody is also incorporated into South Africa's anthem
Zimbabwe adopted 1994

Citation

"Countries Compared by Government > National anthem > Note. International Statistics at NationMaster.com", CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011. Aggregates compiled by NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/stats/Government/National-anthem/Note

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