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Health > Circulatory disease deaths: Countries Compared

DEFINITION: Standardised death rates per 100 000 population (1999).

CONTENTS

# COUNTRY AMOUNT DATE GRAPH
1 Ireland 324 deaths per 100,000 peopl 1999
2 Austria 297 deaths per 100,000 peopl 1999
3 Germany 292 deaths per 100,000 peopl 1999
4 Finland 284 deaths per 100,000 peopl 1999
=5 United Kingdom 265 deaths per 100,000 peopl 1999
=5 United States 265 deaths per 100,000 peopl 1999
7 Sweden 260 deaths per 100,000 peopl 1999
8 Norway 258 deaths per 100,000 peopl 1999
9 Denmark 251 deaths per 100,000 peopl 1999
10 New Zealand 247 deaths per 100,000 peopl 1999
11 Belgium 246 deaths per 100,000 peopl 1999
12 Italy 243 deaths per 100,000 peopl 1999
13 Netherlands 230 deaths per 100,000 peopl 1999
Group of 7 countries (G7) average (profile) 229 deaths per 100,000 peopl 1999
14 Canada 219 deaths per 100,000 peopl 1999
15 Switzerland 218 deaths per 100,000 peopl 1999
16 Australia 214 deaths per 100,000 peopl 1999
17 France 168 deaths per 100,000 peopl 1999
18 Japan 151 deaths per 100,000 peopl 1999

Citation

"Countries Compared by Health > Circulatory disease deaths. International Statistics at NationMaster.com", OECD Health Data 2003 and Health Data 2002. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Australia's Health 2002. Aggregates compiled by NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/stats/Health/Circulatory-disease-deaths

Health > Circulatory disease deaths: Countries Compared Map

NationMaster

Interesting observations about Health > Circulatory disease deaths

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I am trying to learn whether anyone tracks the number of deaths due to freezing during the winter, ideally due to lack of ability to heat one's living space. Does anyone have any tips for me?

Posted on 07 Feb 2010

KMH

KMH

0

Diseases of the heart and circulation - cardiovascular and cerebrovascular - such as heart attacks and stroke, kill more people than any others, accounting for over 15 million deaths, or about 30% of the global total, every year. Many more millions of people are disabled by them. Regarded largely as lifestyle diseases because smoking, obesity, unhealthy diet and heavy alcohol consumption increase the risk of developing them, circulatory diseases were once thought of as affecting exclusively industrialized nations.
Now, as developing countries modernize, they are gradually controlling communicable diseases, and the life expectancy of their populations is increasing. Unfortunately, the risks of circulatory diseases are also increasing, partly because of the adoption of lifestyles similar to those common in industrialized countries.These diseases are emerging rapidly as a major public health concern in most developing countries, where they now account for about 25% of all deaths - 10 out of 40 million. In developed countries, almost half of all deaths - more than 5 out of 12 million - are attributable to them.

Posted on 01 Jan 2005

Karen Collins

Karen Collins

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