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Health > Malnutrition > Number of Undernourished > Million: Countries Compared

Author: chris.lockyer781

Author: chris.lockyer781

Malnutrition is the condition caused by inadequate intake of energy and nutrients necessary for health. Primary malnutrition is due to insufficient intake of food, while secondary malnutrition is caused by disease. Aside from protein-energy malnutrition, deficiencies in nutrients including iron, Vitamin A, iodine and zinc are the most important forms of malnutrition. As of 2012, It is estimated that 870 million people are malnourished. This represents 12% of the world population.

Causes of Malnutrition

Poverty is the underlying cause of malnutrition, and almost all malnourished people are citizens of developing countries. Almost 25% of the population in Sub Saharan Africa is malnourished. Asia has the highest number of malnourished people, reaching up to 500 million. According to World Bank reports, malnutrition and poverty reinforce each other. The poor nutritional status of a developing country decreases its annual GDP by up to 3%.

Another leading cause of malnutrition is illness, especially infectious diseases like diarrhea, malaria, measles and AIDS. Water borne diseases are of particular importance in countries with poor access to sanitation. Other underlying causes of hunger identified in developing countries include harmful economic systems which cause a huge disparity in distribution of resources, conflict and violence which increase the number of refugees, and climate change.

Malnutrition is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Impaired immunity arising from malnutrition is the number one cause of death in both adults and children. The most susceptible to the ill effects of malnutrition are women and young children. Up to 50% of deaths in children below 5 years of age is related to malnutrition. In developing countries, the most common cause of low birth weight is poor maternal nutrition.

Citations:

  1. Food and Agriculture Organization. 2012. "The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2012"http://www.fao.org/docrep/016/i3027e/i3027e00.htm

  2. Hunger Notes: 2013 World Hunger and Poverty Facts and Statistics. http://www.worldhunger.org/articles/Learn/world%20hunger%20facts%202002.htm

  3. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 2000, 78: 1207–1221.

  4. Repositioning Nutrition as Central to Development. A Strategy for Large-Scale Action. World Bank report. http://siteresources.worldbank.org/NUTRITION/Resources/281846-1131636806329/NutritionStrategy.pdf

DEFINITION: Number of undernourished people in 2001-2003. Figures are in millions..

CONTENTS

# COUNTRY AMOUNT DATE GRAPH
1 IndiaIndia 217.05 million 2003
2 ChinaChina 154 million 2003
3 BangladeshBangladesh 43.45 million 2003
4 Democratic Republic of the CongoCongo, DR. 37 million 2003
5 PakistanPakistan 35.2 million 2003
6 EthiopiaEthiopia 31.5 million 2003
7 TanzaniaTanzania 16.1 million 2003
8 PhilippinesPhilippines 15.2 million 2003
9 BrazilBrazil 14.4 million 2003
10 VietnamVietnam 13.8 million 2003
11 IndonesiaIndonesia 13.8 million 2003
12 ThailandThailand 13.4 million 2003
13 NigeriaNigeria 11.5 million 2003
14 KenyaKenya 9.7 million 2003
15 SudanSudan 8.8 million 2003
16 MozambiqueMozambique 8.3 million 2003
17 North KoreaNorth Korea 7.9 million 2003
18 MadagascarMadagascar 7.1 million 2003
19 YemenYemen 7.1 million 2003
20 ColombiaColombia 5.9 million 2003
21 ZimbabweZimbabwe 5.7 million 2003
22 MexicoMexico 5.1 million 2003
23 ZambiaZambia 5.1 million 2003
24 AngolaAngola 5 million 2003

Citation

"All countries compared for Health > Malnutrition > Number of Undernourished (million)", Various sources compiled into Wikipedia's Malnutrition. Aggregates compiled by NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/stats/Health/Malnutrition/Number-of-Undernourished/Million

Health > Malnutrition > Number of Undernourished > Million: Countries Compared Map

NationMaster

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Malnutrition is the condition caused by inadequate intake of energy and nutrients necessary for health. Primary malnutrition is due to insufficient intake of food, while secondary malnutrition is caused by disease. Aside from protein-energy malnutrition, deficiencies in nutrients including iron, Vitamin A, iodine and zinc are the most important forms of malnutrition. As of 2012, It is estimated that 870 million people are malnourished. This represents 12% of the world population.

Causes of Malnutrition

Poverty is the underlying cause of malnutrition, and almost all malnourished people are citizens of developing countries. Almost 25% of the population in Sub Saharan Africa is malnourished. Asia has the highest number of malnourished people, reaching up to 500 million. According to World Bank reports, malnutrition and poverty reinforce each other. The poor nutritional status of a developing country decreases its annual GDP by up to 3%.

Another leading cause of malnutrition is illness, especially infectious diseases like diarrhea, malaria, measles and AIDS. Water borne diseases are of particular importance in countries with poor access to sanitation. Other underlying causes of hunger identified in developing countries include harmful economic systems which cause a huge disparity in distribution of resources, conflict and violence which increase the number of refugees, and climate change.

Malnutrition is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Impaired immunity arising from malnutrition is the number one cause of death in both adults and children. The most susceptible to the ill effects of malnutrition are women and young children. Up to 50% of deaths in children below 5 years of age is related to malnutrition. In developing countries, the most common cause of low birth weight is poor maternal nutrition.

Citations:

  1. Food and Agriculture Organization. 2012. "The State of Food Insecurity in the World 2012"http://www.fao.org/docrep/016/i3027e/i3027e00.htm

  2. Hunger Notes: 2013 World Hunger and Poverty Facts and Statistics. http://www.worldhunger.org/articles/Learn/world%20hunger%20facts%202002.htm

  3. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 2000, 78: 1207–1221.

  4. Repositioning Nutrition as Central to Development. A Strategy for Large-Scale Action. World Bank report. http://siteresources.worldbank.org/NUTRITION/Resources/281846-1131636806329/NutritionStrategy.pdf

Posted on 09 Apr 2014

chris.lockyer781

chris.lockyer781

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