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People > Size of houses: Countries Compared

Author: Ian Graham <br>Staff Editor

Author: Ian Graham <br>Staff Editor

The only point being made here is that people in the top five countries for this statistic have a lot of space, and that they all speak English, which is a factor of their sharing a common mother country. It isn’t surprising for the United States, New Zealand, Canada and Australia to have such large houses, since those countries all have population densities of less than 30 people per square kilometer, far less than the United Kingdom’s rate of 244.69 people per square kilometer.

One point I could make is that, along with its language, England also exported a culture which valued individuality and privacy, and also that these former colonies have prospered economically, with New Zealand having the lowest ranking of the five in GDP per capita, at 35th-highest in the world. Presumably, people in Pakistan, India and Nicaragua would build houses large enough so that up to three people didn’t have to share a room, if they could afford to.

Other points could also be made, such as the relationship that seems to exist between controlled population growth (all five of the countries with the largest houses have an average annual increase of less than one percent) and a higher standard of living. Of course, there is no way to tell which way this relationship works. Do people have fewer children as living standards rise or vice-versa?

DEFINITION: Proportion of houses with five or more rooms, 2002..

CONTENTS

# COUNTRY AMOUNT DATE GRAPH
1 CanadaCanada 75% 2002
2 New ZealandNew Zealand 74% 2002
3 United KingdomUnited Kingdom 73% 2002
4 United StatesUnited States 72% 2002
5 AustraliaAustralia 70% 2002
6 IrelandIreland 67% 2002
Group of 7 countries (G7) averageGroup of 7 countries (G7) average 52.14% 2002
7 NorwayNorway 44% 2002
8 NetherlandsNetherlands 43% 2002
9 GermanyGermany 40% 2002
10 ItalyItaly 38% 2002
11 BelgiumBelgium 36% 2002
12 FranceFrance 36% 2002
13 JapanJapan 31% 2002
14 DenmarkDenmark 29% 2002
15 SwitzerlandSwitzerland 27% 2002
16 SwedenSweden 23% 2002
17 AustriaAustria 19% 2002
18 FinlandFinland 14% 2002

Citation

"All countries compared for People > Size of houses", Figures are all from the market analysts Euromonitor. See also Japan Almanac 1998 (Asahi Shimbun, Tokyo, 1998. Aggregates compiled by NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/stats/People/Size-of-houses

People > Size of houses: Countries Compared Map

NationMaster

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The only point being made here is that people in the top five countries for this statistic have a lot of space, and that they all speak English, which is a factor of their sharing a common mother country. It isn’t surprising for the United States, New Zealand, Canada and Australia to have such large houses, since those countries all have population densities of less than 30 people per square kilometer, far less than the United Kingdom’s rate of 244.69 people per square kilometer.

One point I could make is that, along with its language, England also exported a culture which valued individuality and privacy, and also that these former colonies have prospered economically, with New Zealand having the lowest ranking of the five in GDP per capita, at 35th-highest in the world. Presumably, people in Pakistan, India and Nicaragua would build houses large enough so that up to three people didn’t have to share a room, if they could afford to.

Other points could also be made, such as the relationship that seems to exist between controlled population growth (all five of the countries with the largest houses have an average annual increase of less than one percent) and a higher standard of living. Of course, there is no way to tell which way this relationship works. Do people have fewer children as living standards rise or vice-versa?

Posted on 15 Apr 2005

Ian Graham <br>Staff Editor

Ian Graham <br>Staff Editor

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The top five countries for size of houses are all English-speaking and, with the exception of their common mother country (the United Kingdom), share a common history as one-time British colonies.

Over 70 percent of houses in these countries have five or more rooms, but Australia, at 13 percent, is the only one where more than 10 percent of households have five or more people.

The average household size in Canada, the U.S. and Australia is 2.6 people. That’s equal to or less than the number of people per room in Pakistan, India and Nicaragua.

Posted on 28 Mar 2005

Ian Graham <br>Staff Editor

Ian Graham <br>Staff Editor

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