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Czech Republic

Facts and stats about Czech Republic

Edsel.G

Author: Edsel.G

The Czech Republic is a landlocked country in Central Eastern Europe with Prague as its capital. Just like many countries in the continent, Czech Republic is rich in history.

Early in the 9th century, the nation was dominated by the Moravian Empire. In fact, the Czech Republic currently lies on many territories of what was once Bohemia and Morovia. With the fall of the Morovians, the small state was formally annexed and became a part of the Holy Roman Empire. At this time, the dukes of the state expanded the territory to the greatest extent. However, wars that plagued Europe early in its history took its toll on the small state, although it did not stop the country from gaining affluence. By the start of the First World War, half of the country was one of the great industrial centers of Europe.

After the World War I, the Czechs and Slovaks merged and formed the unified Czechoslovakia. At the end of the Second World War, the country fell under the Soviet sphere of influence; attributed to its disillusionment of the West’s failure to come to their aid (it was the USSR’s Red Army which liberated the country). Communism, however, did not fare well with many of the country’s citizens, and dissent, along with demands for democratization, grew rapidly. This led to the momentary occupation of the Warsaw Pact forces on major population centers of Czechoslovakia and ushered in ‘Normalization,’ a period of abuse and repression.

In 1989, the peaceful Velvet Revolution threw out the communist government and established the democracy in the country. However, unsolvable differences between the Czechs and Slovaks led to the split of the country to two autonomous nations: Czech Republic and the Republic of Slovakia.

Today, the Czech Republic is the very first Comecon (communist countries under Soviet control) to achieve the status of a developed country. It has one of the highest Human Development Index in the world, and is the 14th most peaceful country as of 2013.

10.16 million

Population. Ranked 86th in 2013.

$18,607.71

GDP per capita. Ranked 37th in 2012.

Borders

Austria 362 km, Germany 815 km, Poland 615 km, Slovakia 197 km
Largest city Prague - 1,215,771
Capital city Prague - 1,215,771
Major language Czech
Major religion Christianity
Monetary unit Czech koruna
Prime minister Bohuslav Sobotka
Alternative names czech rep. c, Czech Republic, czech rep., Ceska Republika, Czech Rep., Czechoslovakia (former)
Groups Cold countries, Eastern Europe, Europe, European Union, High income OECD countries, Landlocked countries, NATO countries, Non-religious countries, World

Interesting observations about Czech Republic

Czech Republic ranked first for GDP > composition by sector > industry amongst European Union in 2012.
Czech Republic ranked first for FIFA world ranking > men amongst Europe in 2006.
Czech Republic ranked third for age structure > 65 years and over amongst Landlocked countries in 2013.
Czech Republic ranked second for GDP per capita amongst Eastern Europe in 2012.
Czech Republic ranked first for death rate amongst Non-religious countries in 2013.
Czech Republic ranked second for land use > arable land amongst High income OECD countries in 2013.
Czech Republic ranked first for industrial > production growth rate amongst NATO countries in 2010.
Czech Republic ranked third last for birth rate amongst Cold countries in 2013.
Czech Republic ranked #6 for secondary education, duration > years globally in 2012.

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The Czech Republic is a landlocked country in Central Eastern Europe with Prague as its capital. Just like many countries in the continent, Czech Republic is rich in history.

Early in the 9th century, the nation was dominated by the Moravian Empire. In fact, the Czech Republic currently lies on many territories of what was once Bohemia and Morovia. With the fall of the Morovians, the small state was formally annexed and became a part of the Holy Roman Empire. At this time, the dukes of the state expanded the territory to the greatest extent. However, wars that plagued Europe early in its history took its toll on the small state, although it did not stop the country from gaining affluence. By the start of the First World War, half of the country was one of the great industrial centers of Europe.

After the World War I, the Czechs and Slovaks merged and formed the unified Czechoslovakia. At the end of the Second World War, the country fell under the Soviet sphere of influence; attributed to its disillusionment of the West’s failure to come to their aid (it was the USSR’s Red Army which liberated the country). Communism, however, did not fare well with many of the country’s citizens, and dissent, along with demands for democratization, grew rapidly. This led to the momentary occupation of the Warsaw Pact forces on major population centers of Czechoslovakia and ushered in ‘Normalization,’ a period of abuse and repression.

In 1989, the peaceful Velvet Revolution threw out the communist government and established the democracy in the country. However, unsolvable differences between the Czechs and Slovaks led to the split of the country to two autonomous nations: Czech Republic and the Republic of Slovakia.

Today, the Czech Republic is the very first Comecon (communist countries under Soviet control) to achieve the status of a developed country. It has one of the highest Human Development Index in the world, and is the 14th most peaceful country as of 2013.

Posted on 06 Apr 2014

Edsel.G

Edsel.G

250 Stat enthusiast

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Tourists who have gone to the Czech Republic describe the Czech people as typically quiet but fun-loving people and proud of their heritage. Czechs belong to the West Slavic racial group of Central Europe. The Czech language is similar to the Slovaks and Upper Sorbian dialect. Among the ancestors of modern Czechs are ancient Slavs who used to live in Bohemia, Upper Silesia and Moravia starting in the 6th century. They were also descendants of Celtic and Germanic tribes who blended with the Slavic invaders.

There was a wide scale immigration of Germans into Czech territory during the middle part of the 13th century. That is why some of these people have German lineage. In 1918, an independent Czechoslovakia was declared and Czechs formed the principal class in the new state. These people came from the Austro-Hungary Monarchy. Before World War II (1938), the Munich Agreement separated Sudetenland with significant number of Czech minority from Czechoslovakia. The following year, the German Nazis established the Bohemian Protectorate. A big number of local Czechs were victims if German abuses during the war.

The Czech Republic is a landlocked country located in Central Europe surrounded by Germany, Austria, Poland and Slovakia. It has a population of 1.3 million inhabitants and includes the territories of Bohemia, Silesia and Moravia. More than 90 percent of the inhabitants of this republic are Czech while the rest are composed of Slovaks, Poles, Gypsies, Germans, and Hungarians. More than 25 percent of them are Roman Catholics with a small group belonging to the Hussite Minority and Orthodox Christians. The Czech people are predominantly European in origin just like many of their neighbours. However, some have interesting roots from the Asian and African continents. Many Czechs have also migrated to major cities of the world such as Chicago in the United States and Vienna in Austria.

Posted on 03 Apr 2014

jaacosta47

jaacosta47

424 Stat enthusiast

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