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Economy > Population below poverty line: Countries Compared

Ian Graham, Staff Editor

Author: Ian Graham, Staff Editor

The official United States government poverty guidelines for 2005 (see http://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty/05poverty.shtml) set the poverty level at US$9,570 for a single person in the lower 48 states and Washington, D.C. For each additional person, US$3,260 is added to the general poverty threshold. So the poverty level for a family of four would be US$19,350.

The minimum wage in the United States is US$5.15 an hour, which means that a family of four with both parents working full-time minimum-wage jobs would earn US$21,424 per year (assuming 40 hours worked per week).

The U.S. poverty threshold is greater than the GDP per capita in many other countries, but this doesn’t mean it's better to be poor in America than average somewhere else. Prices for the same goods vary greatly from country to country. To get an idea of where one country’s poor stand in relation to another’s, comparisons would have to be made in purchasing power parity.

DEFINITION: National estimates of the percentage of the population lying below the poverty line are based on surveys of sub-groups, with the results weighted by the number of people in each group. Definitions of poverty vary considerably among nations. For example, rich nations generally employ more generous standards of poverty than poor nations.

CONTENTS

# COUNTRY AMOUNT DATE GRAPH HISTORY
1 Liberia 80% 2000
2 Zimbabwe 80% 2004
3 Chad 80% 2001
4 Haiti 80% 2003
5 Democratic Republic of the Congo 71% 2006
6 Sierra Leone 70.2% 2004
7 Nigeria 70% 2010
8 Suriname 70% 2002
9 Swaziland 69% 2006
10 Burundi 68% 2002
11 Sao Tome and Principe 66.2% 2009
12 Honduras 65% 2010
13 Zambia 64% 2006
14 Niger 63% 1993
15 Comoros 60% 2002
16 Namibia 55.8% 2013
17 Malawi 55% 2004
18 Senegal 54% 2001
19 Guatemala 54% 2011
20 Mozambique 52% 2009
21 Mexico 51.3% 2013
22 South Sudan 50.6% 2009
23 Madagascar 50% 2004
24 Kenya 50% 2000
25 Eritrea 50% 2004
26 Bolivia 49.6% 2013
27 Lesotho 49% 1999
28 The Gambia 48.4% 2010
29 Cameroon 48% 2000
30 Guinea 47% 2006
31 Burkina Faso 46.7% 2009
32 Congo, Republic of the 46.5% 2011
33 Sudan 46.5% 2009
34 Yemen 45.2% 2003
35 Rwanda 44.9% 2011
36 Nicaragua 42.5% 2009
37 Cote d'Ivoire 42% 2006
38 Djibouti 42% 2007
39 East Timor 41% 2009
40 Angola 40.5% 2006
41 Bangladesh 40% 2010
42 Mauritania 40% 2004
43 Tajikistan 39.6% 2012
44 Gaza Strip 38% 2010
45 Grenada 38% 2008
46 Benin 37.4% 2007
47 Papua New Guinea 37% 2002
48 El Salvador 36.5% 2010
49 Mali 36.1% 2005
50 Tanzania 36% 2002
51 Afghanistan 36% 2009
52 Armenia 35.8% 2010
53 Guyana 35% 2006
54 Paraguay 34.7% 2010
55 Dominican Republic 34.4% 2010
56 Colombia 34.1% 2011
57 Kyrgyzstan 33.7% 2011
58 Belize 33.5% 2010
59 Burma 32.7% 2007
60 Togo 32% 1989
61 Venezuela 31.6% 2011
62 South Africa 31.3% 2009
63 Fiji 31% 2009
64 Republic of Macedonia 30.4% 2011
65 Botswana 30.3% 2003
66 Turkmenistan 30% 2004
67 Kosovo 30% 2010
68 Argentina 30% 2013
69 Cape Verde 30% 2000
70 India 29.8% 2010
71 Mongolia 29.8% 2011
72 Ethiopia 29.2% 2010
73 Dominica 29% 2009
74 Virgin Islands 28.9% 2002
75 Ghana 28.5% 2007
76 Lebanon 28% 1999
77 Peru 27.8% 2011
78 Ecuador 27.3% 2012
79 Belarus 27.1% 2003
80 Federated States of Micronesia 26.7% 2000
81 Philippines 26.5% 2009
82 Panama 26% 2012
83 Laos 26% 2010
84 Nepal 25.2% 2011
85 Iraq 25% 2008
86 Costa Rica 24.8% 2011
87 Uganda 24.5% 2009
88 Ukraine 24.1% 2010
89 Tonga 24% 2007
90 Israel 23.6% 2013
91 Bhutan 23.2% 2008
92 Anguilla 23% 2002
93 Guam 23% 2001
94 Algeria 23% 2006
95 Pakistan 22.3% 2006
96 Romania 22.2% 2011
97 Moldova 21.9% 2010
98 Bulgaria 21.8% 2008
99 Brazil 21.4% 2013
100 Spain 21.1% 2012
101 Croatia 21.1% 2011
102 Slovakia 21% 2002
103 Greece 20% 2009
104 Cambodia 20% 2012
105 Egypt 20% 2005
106 French Polynesia 19.7% 2009
107 Italy 19.6% 2011
108 United Arab Emirates 19.5% 2003
109 Iran 18.7% 2007
110 Bosnia and Herzegovina 18.6% 2007
111 Uruguay 18.6% 2010
112 West Bank 18.3% 2010
113 Chile 18.2% 2009
114 Portugal 18% 2006
115 Estonia 17.5% 2010
116 Uzbekistan 17% 2011
117 Trinidad and Tobago 17% 2007
118 Turkey 16.9% 2010
119 South Korea 16.5% 2011
120 Jamaica 16.5% 2009
121 Maldives 16% 2008
122 Japan 16% 2010
123 Germany 15.5% 2010
124 Malta 15.4% 2011
125 Belgium 15.2% 2007
126 United States 15.1% 2010
127 Morocco 15% 2007
128 Jordan 14.2% 2002
129 Hungary 14% 2012
130 United Kingdom 14% 2006
131 Slovenia 13.6% 2011
132 Denmark 13.4% 2011
133 China 13.4% 2013
134 Russia 12.7% 2011
135 Albania 12.5% 2008
136 Syria 11.9% 2006
137 Indonesia 11.7% 2012
138 Vietnam 11.3% 2012
139 Azerbaijan 11% 2009
140 Bermuda 11% 2008
141 Poland 10.6% 2008
142 Netherlands 10.5% 2005
143 Canada 9.4% 2013
144 The Bahamas 9.3% 2004
145 Georgia 9.2% 2010
146 Serbia 9.2% 2010
147 Greenland 9.2% 2007
148 Czech Republic 9% 2010
149 Sri Lanka 8.9% 2010
150 Serbia and Montenegro 8.8% 2010
151 Mauritius 8% 2006
152 Andorra 8% 2008
153 Switzerland 7.9% 2010
154 France 7.8% 2010
155 Thailand 7.8% 2010
156 Libya 7.4% 2005
157 Tunisia 7.4% 2005
158 Montenegro 6.6% 2010
159 Austria 6.2% 2012
160 Ireland 5.5% 2009
161 Kazakhstan 5.3% 2011
162 Lithuania 4% 2008
163 Malaysia 3.8% 2009
164 Taiwan 1.5% 2012

Citation

"Countries Compared by Economy > Population below poverty line. International Statistics at NationMaster.com", CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011. Aggregates compiled by NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/stats/Economy/Population-below-poverty-line

Economy > Population below poverty line: Countries Compared Map

NationMaster

1

@ricky

It is a huge generalization to say that taxation is high in New Zealand due to many people on the dole. The unemployment rate in New Zealand is 6%. Considering the global economic crisis, this is not that high. Taxes are necessary to pay for public services, like health, education, infrastructure etc, not just social security.

Posted on 21 Jul 2010

John

John

0

The official United States government poverty guidelines for 2005 (see http://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty/05poverty.shtml) set the poverty level at US$9,570 for a single person in the lower 48 states and Washington, D.C. For each additional person, US$3,260 is added to the general poverty threshold. So the poverty level for a family of four would be US$19,350.

The minimum wage in the United States is US$5.15 an hour, which means that a family of four with both parents working full-time minimum-wage jobs would earn US$21,424 per year (assuming 40 hours worked per week).

The U.S. poverty threshold is greater than the GDP per capita in many other countries, but this doesn’t mean it's better to be poor in America than average somewhere else. Prices for the same goods vary greatly from country to country. To get an idea of where one country’s poor stand in relation to another’s, comparisons would have to be made in purchasing power parity.

Posted on 09 Mar 2005

Ian Graham, Staff Editor

Ian Graham, Staff Editor

0

The United States is commonly known as a country of immigrants, and it is a popular destination for those seeking a better life in a new country, but it doesn’t seem that it is the most popular destination for immigrants anymore.

Both the United Kingdom and Germany had a greater number of asylum seekers than the U.S. in 2001.

Denmark, Canada, Finland and Sweden all had higher asylum-seekers acceptance rates, and the U.S. has a lower foreign population than Luxembourg, New Zealand, Australia, Switzerland and Canada.

The net migration rate for the U.S. was estimated to be 3.52 per 1,000 population in 2003, lower than 29 other countries.

However, the U.S. did lead the world in new citizenships, with 898,000. One also has to take into mind that the many illegal aliens who enter the United States, especially from Mexico, are not included in these statistics.

Posted on 15 Apr 2005

Ian Graham, Staff Editor

Ian Graham, Staff Editor

0

In response to Jenna:

According to the Canadian council on social development, 16.2% of Canadians are living below the poverty line Including 14.6% of men and 17.7% of women. Those most affected by poverty include female-led sole parent families and single elderly people. One quarter of those living in poverty are children under 18 years of age.



Canada has no official definition of poverty with different organisations using different definitions. Poverty definitions include:


  • Households which spend 20 percentage points more of their income on Food, clothing and shelter than the average Canadian household. If the average Canadian household spends 50% of its income on these essentials, those who spend 70% or more are considered to be poor.

  • Statistics Canada low income measures.

  • The Cost of Living Guidelines developed by the Social Planning Council of B.C.




Further information on poverty in Canada can be found on the Canadian council on social development web page.

Posted on 07 Jun 2005

Edria Murray, Staff Editor

Edria Murray, Staff Editor

0

Hi Michelle, you can create a graph from the data on Denmark's total population or population growth rate. However, while you can see the graph online, in order to download or print it, you need to be a supporter.

Posted on 20 Apr 2005

Suchita Vemuri, Staff Editor

Suchita Vemuri, Staff Editor

0

Hi Deedee, what specific aspect of the Maldives economy are you looking for? Graphs can be generated only on specific data.

Posted on 06 Mar 2005

Suchita Vemuri, Staff Editor

Suchita Vemuri, Staff Editor

0

Hi Rach, the profile of Korea will give you most of this information, and for more, follow the links.

Posted on 06 Mar 2005

Suchita Vemuri, Staff Editor

Suchita Vemuri, Staff Editor

0

Hi Vincent -- if you follow the link at the top of the chart to 'view all countries', you'll get the data for the developed countries. In the US, for example, about 12% of the population lives below the national poverty line; national definitions of 'poverty' varies between countries.

Posted on 06 Mar 2005

Suchita Vemuri, Staff Editor

Suchita Vemuri, Staff Editor

0

Hi Allan, apart from ranking countries by the proportion of the population below the poverty line (where the Philippines stands at 53rd, with 40% 'poor' as shown in this table), poverty levels in countries can be ranked by the proportion of people living on less than USD1, by total GDP or GDP per capita or by GDP by purchasing power parity, which measures the cost of the same good or service across countries. The more developed or wealthy a country, the more it is likely to charge for the identical products and services, principally because its labor and currency will command more.

The links here will show that the Philippines ranks relatively low in all these measurement categories.

Posted on 06 Mar 2005

Suchita Vemuri, Staff Editor

Suchita Vemuri, Staff Editor

0

The Maldives ranks 17 on the UNDP Human Poverty Index (HPI), which is calculated on two basic parameters ¾ population without sustainable access to an improved water source and the number of children who are underweight for their age. It ranks 84 on the Human Development Index.

Criteria for assessment of poverty levels vary between nations, and statistics are not strictly comparable. However, the UNDP also has an incomplete list of populations with income levels below USD1 and USD2; but many nations either do not have this information or are reluctant to part with the estimates because of the politically sensitive nature of the data.

While Singapore and Barbados rank 6 and 1, respectively, on the HPI, do not have any citizens earning less than USD 1 or USD2, while Costa Rica, which ranks 4 on the HPI, has 22% living below the nationally defined poverty line, 9.5% earning less than USD2 and 2% less than USD1.

Posted on 21 Jan 2005

Suchita Vemuri, Staff Editor

Suchita Vemuri, Staff Editor

0

New Zealand does not have a poverty line for a reason - they do not want anyone to know how many people are actually living in poverty there. It's no secret though that many Kiwis leave because the wages are low and the taxes are high. The taxes are high because many people are on the dole.

Posted on 17 Jul 2010

Rick

Rick

0

Around 50 countries remain unaccounted for. I know places like Norway and Sweden show n/a on poverty on several sites. Anyone know about the others?

Posted on 09 Jul 2010

michelle

michelle

0

What effect has the last few years had on these statistics?


Charles King
http://www.8thsisterenergy.com

Posted on 26 Jun 2010

Where are more current numbers

Where are more current numbers

0

I love teedy bears and I think you should put them in your next advertisment for want ever your are doing.

Posted on 09 Jun 2010

katie davis

katie davis

0

Ian Graham
Staff Editor
9th March 2005 The official United States government poverty guidelines for 2005 (see http://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty/05poverty.shtml) set the poverty level at US$9,570 for a single person in the lower 48 states and Washington, D.C. For each additional person, US$3,260 is added to the general poverty threshold. So the poverty level for a family of four would be US$19,350.

The minimum wage in the United States is US$5.15 an hour, which means that a family of four with both parents working full-time minimum-wage jobs would earn US$21,424 per year (assuming 40 hours worked per week).

The U.S. poverty threshold is greater than the GDP per capita in many other countries, but this doesn’t mean it's better to be poor in America than average somewhere else. Prices for the same goods vary greatly from country to country. To get an idea of where one country’s poor stand in relation to another’s, comparisons would have to be made in purchasing power parity.

Posted on 10 May 2010

barney

barney

0

Some specialists argue that mortgage loans help a lot of people to live their own way, because they are able to feel free to buy needed goods. Furthermore, a lot of banks present auto loan for different persons.

Posted on 11 Apr 2010

CamachoJolene

CamachoJolene

0

Hi.

I am doing a speech in school on world poverty. I know that China does not share their economical status to others because they think that people will figure out secrets about their corrupt government. So, how do you know that these statistics on certain corrupt countries are true? My email is estherseim@sbcglobal.net. If you can answer my question, that would be great!

Thank You,

Esther Seim (12 years old)

Posted on 02 Mar 2010

Esther

Esther

0

What happened to Malta? Last I looked that was a sovereign nation... not in the table at all...

Posted on 18 Sep 2009

Andy TOwler

Andy TOwler

0

Is poverty line equates and similar to all countries?
I'm sure that "poor" in Liberia doesn't earn as much as "poor" in Taiwan. Even proprtionality may some times decieving.

Posted on 26 Aug 2009

Abe+Bird

Abe+Bird

0

Could a stat be put up of orphan rates per capita be added to the site? That would be great.

Posted on 26 May 2009

Joshua

Joshua

0

Could you please update your statistics,
Suriname's statistics have changed quite a bit for the better since 2002.

Posted on 11 May 2009

John Sno

John Sno

0

What percent population below poverty line.

Posted on 27 Apr 2009

Chris

Chris

0

Everyone needs to do something to help deal with all the poverty in the world. This wouldn't have happened if everyone was treated with equality.

Posted on 27 May 2009

Laura (Australia)

Laura (Australia)

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