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Iran

Iran Energy Stats

Edsel.G

Author: Edsel.G

Iran is a member of the OPEC and is one of the world’s top producers of oil and the world’s leader when it comes to proven gas reserves. More specifically, Iran holds 10% of the world’s proven oil deposits, while 15% of gas reserves in the world are in the country. These facts would easily make Iran one of the richest countries today.

However, technological inefficiency, lack of political will, and international sanctions all have lead to the stoppage of oil and gas refinement. While the country holds some of the world’s untapped petroleum reserves, Iran still imports many of its petroleum needs. This is due to the inefficiency of available Iranian technology to tap and process oil underneath the territory. As of 2005, only a few oil and gas exploratory operations were conducted due to technological lags.

Energy production in Iran is diversified, and this is not necessarily a bad thing. Hydroelectric plants are scattered all over the country and this accounts for 7% of all electrical outputs. Recently, geothermal, solar, and wind-powered plants have been opened to enhance reusable and environmentally-friendly energy potential of the country. To compensate for the growing energy demands of the country’s growing industrial power and population, Iran also opened last 2011 its first nuclear powered plant at Bushehr. This nuclear power has led to the middle-eastern crisis which further resulted on Iran’s economic isolation through sanctions from the US and other Western countries. It is widely believed that the creation of the plant veils the attempt by the Iranian nation to develop weapons of mass destruction, an attempt which might be nearing complete realization.

Definitions

  • Coal > Consumption: Billion short tons of coal consumed per country per year.
  • Crude oil > Production: This entry is the total amount of crude oil produced, in barrels per day (bbl/day).
  • Crude oil > Proved reserves: This entry is the stock of proved reserves of crude oil, in barrels (bbl). Proved reserves are those quantities of petroleum which, by analysis of geological and engineering data, can be estimated with a high degree of confidence to be commercially recoverable from a given date forward, from known reservoirs and under current economic conditions.
  • Electric power consumption > KWh: Electric power consumption (kWh). Electric power consumption measures the production of power plants and combined heat and power plants less transmission, distribution, and transformation losses and own use by heat and power plants.
  • Electric power consumption > KWh per capita: Electric power consumption (kWh per capita). Electric power consumption measures the production of power plants and combined heat and power plants less transmission, distribution, and transformation losses and own use by heat and power plants.
  • Electricity > Consumption: Total electricity consumed annually plus imports and minus exports, expressed in kilowatt-hours. The discrepancy between the amount of electricity generated and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is accounted for as loss in transmission and distribution.
  • Electricity > Consumption > Per capita: Total electricity consumed annually plus imports and minus exports, expressed in kilowatt-hours. The discrepancy between the amount of electricity generated and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is accounted for as loss in transmission and distribution. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Electricity > Production: The annual electricity generated expressed in kilowatt-hours. The discrepancy between the amount of electricity generated and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is accounted for as loss in transmission and distribution.
  • Electricity production > KWh: Electricity production (kWh). Electricity production is measured at the terminals of all alternator sets in a station. In addition to hydropower, coal, oil, gas, and nuclear power generation, it covers generation by geothermal, solar, wind, and tide and wave energy, as well as that from combustible renewables and waste. Production includes the output of electricity plants that are designed to produce electricity only as well as that of combined heat and power plants.
  • Energy use > Kg of oil equivalent per capita: Energy use (kg of oil equivalent per capita). Energy use refers to use of primary energy before transformation to other end-use fuels, which is equal to indigenous production plus imports and stock changes, minus exports and fuels supplied to ships and aircraft engaged in international transport.
  • Gasoline > Pump price for gasoline > US$ per liter: Pump price for gasoline (US$ per liter). Fuel prices refer to the pump prices of the most widely sold grade of gasoline. Prices have been converted from the local currency to U.S. dollars.
  • Oil > Consumption: This entry is the total oil consumed in barrels per day (bbl/day). The discrepancy between the amount of oil produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes, refinery gains, and other complicating factors.
  • Oil > Consumption > Per capita: This entry is the total oil consumed in barrels per day (bbl/day). The discrepancy between the amount of oil produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes, refinery gains, and other complicating factors. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Oil > Production: This entry is the total oil produced in barrels per day (bbl/day). The discrepancy between the amount of oil produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes, refinery gains, and other complicating factors.
  • Oil > Production > Per capita: This entry is the total oil produced in barrels per day (bbl/day). The discrepancy between the amount of oil produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes, refinery gains, and other complicating factors. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Coal > Consumption 2.3 million 2001 12th out of 15
Crude oil > Production 3.59 million bbl/day 2012 6th out of 203
Crude oil > Proved reserves 154.6 billion bbl 2013 4th out of 193
Electric power consumption > KWh 199.79 billion 2011 19th out of 135
Electric power consumption > KWh per capita 2,648.84 2011 68th out of 135
Electricity > Consumption 182.7 billion kWh 2010 11th out of 166
Electricity > Consumption > Per capita 2,160.44 kWh per capita 2006 80th out of 188
Electricity > Production 220.3 billion kWh 2011 17th out of 95
Electricity production > KWh 239.71 billion 2011 19th out of 137
Energy use > Kg of oil equivalent per capita 2,812.69 2011 40th out of 137
Gasoline > Pump price for gasoline > US$ per liter $0.33 2012 157th out of 166
Oil > Consumption 1.81 million bbl/day 2009 12th out of 193
Oil > Consumption > Per capita 24.28 bbl/day per 1,000 peopl 2006 44th out of 170
Oil > Production 4.17 million bbl/day 2009 3rd out of 180
Oil > Production > Per capita 61.67 bbl/day per 1,000 peopl 2007 23th out of 111

SOURCES: Energy Information Administration, US Department of Energy; CIA World Factbooks 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013; International Energy Agency; CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ).

Citation

"Iran Energy Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/Iran/Energy

Iran ranked first for natural gas > proved reserves amongst Muslim countries in 2013.
Iran ranked #4 for crude oil > proved reserves globally in 2013.
Iran ranked first for electric power transmission and distribution losses > KWh amongst Middle Eastern and North Africa in 2011.

2

Iran is a member of the OPEC and is one of the world’s top producers of oil and the world’s leader when it comes to proven gas reserves. More specifically, Iran holds 10% of the world’s proven oil deposits, while 15% of gas reserves in the world are in the country. These facts would easily make Iran one of the richest countries today.

However, technological inefficiency, lack of political will, and international sanctions all have lead to the stoppage of oil and gas refinement. While the country holds some of the world’s untapped petroleum reserves, Iran still imports many of its petroleum needs. This is due to the inefficiency of available Iranian technology to tap and process oil underneath the territory. As of 2005, only a few oil and gas exploratory operations were conducted due to technological lags.

Energy production in Iran is diversified, and this is not necessarily a bad thing. Hydroelectric plants are scattered all over the country and this accounts for 7% of all electrical outputs. Recently, geothermal, solar, and wind-powered plants have been opened to enhance reusable and environmentally-friendly energy potential of the country. To compensate for the growing energy demands of the country’s growing industrial power and population, Iran also opened last 2011 its first nuclear powered plant at Bushehr. This nuclear power has led to the middle-eastern crisis which further resulted on Iran’s economic isolation through sanctions from the US and other Western countries. It is widely believed that the creation of the plant veils the attempt by the Iranian nation to develop weapons of mass destruction, an attempt which might be nearing complete realization.

Posted on 07 Apr 2014

Edsel.G

Edsel.G

249 Stat enthusiast

1

Iran is a member of the OPEC and is one of the world’s top producers of oil and the world’s leader when it comes to proven gas reserves. More specifically, Iran holds 10% of the world’s proven oil deposits, while 15% of gas reserves in the world are in the country. These facts would easily make Iran one of the richest countries today.

However, technological inefficiency, lack of political will, and international sanctions all have lead to the stoppage of oil and gas refinement. While the country holds some of the world’s untapped petroleum reserves, Iran still imports many of its petroleum needs. This is due to the inefficiency of available Iranian technology to tap and process oil underneath the territory. As of 2005, only a few oil and gas exploratory operations were conducted due to technological lags. Energy production in Iran is diversified, and this is not necessarily a bad thing. Hydroelectric plants are scattered all over the country and this accounts for 7% of all electrical outputs. Recently, geothermal, solar, and wind-powered plants have been opened to enhance reusable and environmentally-friendly energy potential of the country. To compensate for the growing energy demands of the country’s growing industrial power and population, Iran also opened last 2011 its first nuclear powered plant at Bushehr. This nuclear power has led to the middle-eastern crisis which further resulted on Iran’s economic isolation through sanctions from the US and other Western countries. It is widely believed that the creation of the plant veils the attempt by the Iranian nation to develop weapons of mass destruction, an attempt which might be nearing complete realization.

Posted on 07 Apr 2014

Edsel.G

Edsel.G

249 Stat enthusiast

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