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Italy

Italy Health Stats

Luke.Metcalfe

Author: Luke.Metcalfe

Italy is a country of old people: not only is life expectancy among the longest in the world (79 years for men and 85 years for women) with the additional benefit of a long healthy life expectancy (70.7 years for men and 74.7 years for women); it is quite literally the country of old people with 20.8% of population aged 65 years or older (making Italians the forth oldest population in the world). However, Italy is a rather big country with accordingly big differences between the affluent North and warm South in terms of socioeconomic situation and lifestyle choices. While Northern regions, such as Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia are reported to have excellent health service, Southern regions and islands of Sicily and Sardinia enjoy the more traditional Mediterranean diet and speed of life, perhaps canceling out the inequality in access the quality health care. Overall, Italy has the highest number of practicing physicians per 1.000 people - 4.4 - which is perhaps the health care reform in 1978, establishing the national health service with then relatively big investments in health care, which other members of European Union have only recently caught up to. Either way, Italians enjoy La Dolce Vita without fear of it making them fat - the obesity prevalence was 17.2% in 2008 (European average was 21.9%), or maybe mom’s good cooking is to thank for, since 25.3% of 30- to 44-year-olds still live with their parents.

Definitions

  • Births and maternity > Average age of mother at childbirth: Average age of mother at first childbirth.
  • Births and maternity > Total fertility rate: Total fertility rate.
  • HIV AIDS > People living with HIV AIDS: An estimate of all people (adults and children) alive at yearend with HIV infection, whether or not they have developed symptoms of AIDS.
  • Hospital beds > Per 1,000 people: Hospital beds include inpatient beds available in public, private, general, and specialized hospitals and rehabilitation centers. In most cases beds for both acute and chronic care are included.
  • Life expectancy > Men: Life expectancy for men.
  • Life expectancy > Women: Life expectancy for women.
  • Life expectancy > Years of potential life lost from premature death > Females: Female YPLL. Years lost to premature death. 

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Life expectancy at birth > Total population: The average number of years to be lived by a group of people born in the same year, if mortality at each age remains constant in the future. Life expectancy at birth is also a measure of overall quality of life in a country and summarizes the mortality at all ages. It can also be thought of as indicating the potential return on investment in human capital and is necessary for the calculation of various actuarial measures.
  • Life expectancy at birth, male > Years: Life expectancy at birth, male (years). Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life.
  • Life expectancy at birth, total > Years: Life expectancy at birth, total (years). Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life.
  • Obesity: Percentage of total population who have a BMI (body mass index) greater than 30 Kg/sq.meters (Data for Australia, Austria and Portugal is from 2002. All other data is from 2003). Obesity rates are defined as the percentage of the population with a Body Mass Index (BMI) over 30. The BMI is a single number that evaluates an individual's weight status in relation to height (weight/height2, with weight in kilograms and height in metres). For Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States, figures are based on health examinations, rather than self-reported information. Obesity estimates derived from health examinations are generally higher and more reliable than those coming from self-reports, because they preclude any misreporting of people's height and weight. However, health examinations are only conducted regularly in a few countries (OECD).
  • Physicians > Per 1,000 people: Physicians are defined as graduates of any facility or school of medicine who are working in the country in any medical field (practice, teaching, research).
  • Probability of not reaching 60: Probability at birth of not reaching the age of 40.
  • Probability of reaching 65 > Male: Probability at birth of reaching the age of 65.
  • Quality of health care system > Health care system index: Health Care Index is an estimation of the overall quality of the health care system, health care professionals, equipment, staff, doctors, cost, etc.
STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Births and maternity > Average age of mother at childbirth 31.3 2010 1st out of 62
Births and maternity > Total fertility rate 1.88% 2100 75th out of 196
HIV AIDS > People living with HIV AIDS 140,000 2009 34th out of 133
Hospital beds > Per 1,000 people 4.4 per 1,000 people 2002 21st out of 53
Life expectancy > Men 79 years 2012 1st out of 1
Life expectancy > Women 85 years 2012 1st out of 1
Life expectancy > Years of potential life lost from premature death > Females 1,887 2014 26th out of 29
Life expectancy at birth > Total population 81.77 years 2011 10th out of 216
Life expectancy at birth, male > Years 79.6 2011 10th out of 196
Life expectancy at birth, total > Years 82.09 2011 7th out of 196
Obesity 8.5% 2003 25th out of 29
Physicians > Per 1,000 people 4.2 per 1,000 people 2004 1st out of 67
Probability of not reaching 60 9.1% 2050 42nd out of 48
Probability of reaching 65 > Male 81.6% 2050 13th out of 159
Quality of health care system > Health care system index 64.54 2014 27th out of 46

SOURCES: United Nations Population Division. Source tables; United Nations Population Division. Source tables; CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; World Development Indicators database; British Broadcasting Corporation 2014; Wikipedia: Years of potential life lost (By country); (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; Derived from male and female life expectancy at birth from sources such as: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; OECD Health Data 2005; calculated on the basis of survival data from UN (United Nations). 2001. World Population Prospects 1950-2050: The 2000 Revision. Database. Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. New York; UN (United Nations). 2001. World Population Prospects 1950-2050: The 2000 Revision. Database. Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. New York; health care

Citation

"Italy Health Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/Italy/Health

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Italy is a country of old people: not only is life expectancy among the longest in the world (79 years for men and 85 years for women) with the additional benefit of a long healthy life expectancy (70.7 years for men and 74.7 years for women); it is quite literally the country of old people with 20.8% of population aged 65 years or older (making Italians the forth oldest population in the world). However, Italy is a rather big country with accordingly big differences between the affluent North and warm South in terms of socioeconomic situation and lifestyle choices. While Northern regions, such as Veneto and Friuli Venezia Giulia are reported to have excellent health service, Southern regions and islands of Sicily and Sardinia enjoy the more traditional Mediterranean diet and speed of life, perhaps canceling out the inequality in access the quality health care. Overall, Italy has the highest number of practicing physicians per 1.000 people - 4.4 - which is perhaps the health care reform in 1978, establishing the national health service with then relatively big investments in health care, which other members of European Union have only recently caught up to. Either way, Italians enjoy La Dolce Vita without fear of it making them fat - the obesity prevalence was 17.2% in 2008 (European average was 21.9%), or maybe mom’s good cooking is to thank for, since 25.3% of 30- to 44-year-olds still live with their parents.

Posted on 14 Apr 2014

Luke.Metcalfe

Luke.Metcalfe

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