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Reunion

Reunion Economy Stats

Overview:

The economy has traditionally been based on agriculture, but services now dominate. Sugarcane has been the primary crop for more than a century, and in some years it accounts for 85% of exports. The government has been pushing the development of a tourist industry to relieve high unemployment, which amounts to one-third of the labor force. The gap in Reunion between the well-off and the poor is extraordinary and accounts for the persistent social tensions. The white and Indian communities are substantially better off than other segments of the population, often approaching European standards, whereas minority groups suffer the poverty and unemployment typical of the poorer nations of the African continent. The outbreak of severe rioting in February 1991 illustrated the seriousness of socioeconomic tensions. The economic well-being of Reunion depends heavily on continued financial assistance from France.

Definitions

  • Budget > Expenditures: Expenditures calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms
  • Budget > Revenues: Revenues calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms
  • Exchange rates: The official value of a country's monetary unit at a given date or over a given period of time, as expressed in units of local currency per US dollar and as determined by international market forces or official fiat.
  • Fiscal year: The beginning and ending months for a country's accounting period of 12 months, which often is the calendar year but which may begin in any month. All yearly references are for the calendar year (CY) unless indicated as a noncalendar fiscal year (FY).
  • GDP > Composition by sector > Agriculture: The gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods produced by the agricultural sector within a nation in a given year. GDP dollar estimates in the Factbook are derived from purchasing power parity (PPP) calculations. See the CIA World Factbook for more information.
  • GDP > Composition by sector > Industry: The gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods produced by the industrial sector within a nation in a given year. GDP dollar estimates in the Factbook are derived from purchasing power parity (PPP) calculations. See the CIA World Factbook for more information.
  • GDP > Composition by sector > Services: The gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final services produced within a nation in a given year. GDP dollar estimates in the Factbook are derived from purchasing power parity (PPP) calculations. See the CIA World Factbook for more information.
  • GDP > Purchasing power parity: This entry gives the gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. A nation's GDP at purchasing power parity (PPP) exchange rates is the sum value of all goods and services produced in the country valued at prices prevailing in the United States. This is the measure most economists prefer when looking at per-capita welfare and when comparing living conditions or use of resources across countries. The measure is difficult to compute, as a US dollar value has to be assigned to all goods and services in the country regardless of whether these goods and services have a direct equivalent in the United States (for example, the value of an ox-cart or non-US military equipment); as a result, PPP estimates for some countries are based on a small and sometimes different set of goods and services. In addition, many countries do not formally participate in the World Bank's PPP project that calculates these measures, so the resulting GDP estimates for these countries may lack precision. For many developing countries, PPP-based GDP measures are multiples of the official exchange rate (OER) measure. The difference between the OER- and PPP-denominated GDP values for most of the weathly industrialized countries are generally much smaller.
  • GDP > Purchasing power parity > Per capita: This entry gives the gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. A nation's GDP at purchasing power parity (PPP) exchange rates is the sum value of all goods and services produced in the country valued at prices prevailing in the United States. This is the measure most economists prefer when looking at per-capita welfare and when comparing living conditions or use of resources across countries. The measure is difficult to compute, as a US dollar value has to be assigned to all goods and services in the country regardless of whether these goods and services have a direct equivalent in the United States (for example, the value of an ox-cart or non-US military equipment); as a result, PPP estimates for some countries are based on a small and sometimes different set of goods and services. In addition, many countries do not formally participate in the World Bank's PPP project that calculates these measures, so the resulting GDP estimates for these countries may lack precision. For many developing countries, PPP-based GDP measures are multiples of the official exchange rate (OER) measure. The difference between the OER- and PPP-denominated GDP values for most of the weathly industrialized countries are generally much smaller. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • GDP > Real growth rate: GDP growth on an annual basis adjusted for inflation and expressed as a percent.
  • Size of economy > Share of world GDP : Percent of world GDP (exchange rates).

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Agriculture > Products sugarcane, vanilla, tobacco, tropical fruits, vegetables, corn 2011
Budget > Expenditures $554.70 million 1998 6th out of 13
Budget > Revenues $554.70 million 1998 4th out of 13
Exchange rates euros per US dollar - 0.8054 (2004), 0.886 (2003), 1.0626 (2002), 1.1175 (2001), 1.0854 (2000) 2011
Fiscal year calendar year 2006
GDP > Composition by sector > Agriculture 8% 2000 17th out of 35
GDP > Composition by sector > Industry 19% 2000 22nd out of 35
GDP > Composition by sector > Services 73% 2000 9th out of 35
GDP > Purchasing power parity $4.79 billion 2005 159th out of 176
GDP > Purchasing power parity > Per capita $6,165.15 per capita 2005 90th out of 175
GDP > Real growth rate 2.5% 2005 148th out of 197
Size of economy > Share of world GDP 0.02% 2014 95th out of 156

SOURCES: CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; All CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 18 December 2008; Wikipedia: World distribution of wealth (North America)

Citation

"Reunion Economy Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/Reunion/Economy

NationMaster

Reunion Economy Profiles (Subcategories)

GDP 6 Tourist arrivals by region of origin 4
Tourism receipts 3 Trade 90
  • Reunion ranked 36 places from the bottom for GDP > composition by sector > industry amongst Hot countries in 2000.
  • Reunion ranked 51 places from the bottom for budget > revenues globally in 1998.