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Serbia

Facts and stats about Serbia

Luke.Metcalfe

Author: Luke.Metcalfe

Serbia has only recently began to recover from the wounds, inflicted by the Yugoslavian wars in the last decade of the previous century. As the former seat of government, Serbia had the greatest federal authority, which the more economically developed republics to the North began to dispute at the beginning of 1980s, peaking with Slovenia and Croatia declaring independence in 1991, and Macedonia in 1992. While Slovenia escaped the aftermath with only ten days of war, and Macedonia with no wars at all, Croatia was less lucky - the estimated losses, mainly due to genocide in Croatia and Bosnia&Hercegovina in the years 1991-1994, amount to 140,000. After the conclusion of Croatian War for Independence, the violence moved to Kosovo and ethnical cleansing of muslim Albanians, resulting in hundreds of thousands displaced Albanians in Macedonia in Albania. The United Nations took control over Kosovo in 1999, which eventually gained independence in 2008, but still isn’t recognized by Serbia as an independent country. The population of Serbia in 2012 was 7.22 millions, most of which (85%) are Orthodox-Christian. The nation continues to lag behind in economic development: GDP was $5,189 in 2012 and life expectancy is still bellow European average (72 years for men and 78 years for women). Most of all, the relations between Croatia and Serbia are tense to this day, resulting even in division of the language of Serbo-Croatian to Serbian, Croatian, Montenegrin, and Bosnian.

7.24 million

Population. Ranked 98th in 2013.

$5,189.58

GDP per capita. Ranked 90th in 2012.

Borders

Bosnia and Herzegovina 302 km, Bulgaria 318 km, Croatia 241 km, Hungary 151 km, Kosovo 352 km, Macedonia 62 km, Montenegro 124 km, Romania 476 km
Major language Serbian
Major religion Christianity
Prime minister Ivica Dacic
Groups Christian countries, Eastern Europe, Europe, Former Yugoslavian countries , Heavily indebted countries, Landlocked countries, Potential Future EU Members, Religious countries, World

Interesting observations about Serbia

  • Serbia ranked first for death rate amongst Heavily indebted countries in 2013.
  • Serbia ranked first for age structure > 65 years and over amongst Religious countries in 2013.
  • Serbia ranked second for age structure > 55-64 years amongst Christian countries in 2013.
  • Serbia ranked first for tax > tax payments > number amongst Europe in 2013.
  • Serbia ranked 20 places from the bottom for population amongst Landlocked countries in 2013.
  • Serbia ranked 8th last for GDP amongst Eastern Europe in 2012.
  • Serbia ranked #17 for sex ratio > at birth globally in 2013.
  • Serbia ranked second last for sex ratio > total population amongst Potential Future EU Members in 2013.

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Serbia has only recently began to recover from the wounds, inflicted by the Yugoslavian wars in the last decade of the previous century. As the former seat of government, Serbia had the greatest federal authority, which the more economically developed republics to the North began to dispute at the beginning of 1980s, peaking with Slovenia and Croatia declaring independence in 1991, and Macedonia in 1992. While Slovenia escaped the aftermath with only ten days of war, and Macedonia with no wars at all, Croatia was less lucky - the estimated losses, mainly due to genocide in Croatia and Bosnia&Hercegovina in the years 1991-1994, amount to 140,000. After the conclusion of Croatian War for Independence, the violence moved to Kosovo and ethnical cleansing of muslim Albanians, resulting in hundreds of thousands displaced Albanians in Macedonia in Albania. The United Nations took control over Kosovo in 1999, which eventually gained independence in 2008, but still isn’t recognized by Serbia as an independent country. The population of Serbia in 2012 was 7.22 millions, most of which (85%) are Orthodox-Christian. The nation continues to lag behind in economic development: GDP was $5,189 in 2012 and life expectancy is still bellow European average (72 years for men and 78 years for women). Most of all, the relations between Croatia and Serbia are tense to this day, resulting even in division of the language of Serbo-Croatian to Serbian, Croatian, Montenegrin, and Bosnian.

Posted on 14 Apr 2014

Luke.Metcalfe

Luke.Metcalfe

137 Stat enthusiast