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Switzerland

Switzerland Health Stats

jaacosta47

Author: jaacosta47

The healthcare model of Switzerland espouses collective coverage through mandatory private insurance. Compared to other European nations, the Swiss are not entitled to socialized medicine. However, the government regulates the insurance industry and defines health services that should be offered. By standards, it is a munificent package that includes doctor’s visits, hospitalization stays, medications, physical therapy, prescribed rehabilitation, and in-home nursing care. This law provides equal access to healthcare. Citizens must purchase a plan from any of the 92 insurance agents. Employers do not provide insurance. Thus, people can look for policies that suit their needs.

An academician from the Harvard Business School referred to Switzerland’s system as outstanding. It is consumer-driven, inexpensive, and distributed fairly. The country’s healthcare system is number one in patient fulfilment, management and prevention of chronic ailments, and quality care. The United Nations say that the population of Switzerland is among the healthiest worldwide. It has the second-highest life expectancy globally while the United States is far below in 38th place. In other words, the highest cost of almost $8,000 per person in healthcare spending annually in the United States does not ensure the best equitable care.

Healthcare in Switzerland is not cheap because it costs nearly $5,350 per resident and increased by approximately 3.5 percent for the past two years. Yet, the analysis made in 2010 by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development revealed that out of 29 countries, Switzerland was among the most effective in achieving more effective health outcomes for money spent. Switzerland has the capacity to restrain spending while managing to keep its population healthy.

Definitions

  • Births and maternity > Average age of mother at childbirth: Average age of mother at first childbirth.
  • Births and maternity > Total fertility rate: Total fertility rate.
  • Hospital beds > Per 1,000 people: Hospital beds include inpatient beds available in public, private, general, and specialized hospitals and rehabilitation centers. In most cases beds for both acute and chronic care are included.
  • Infant mortality rate > Total: This entry gives the number of deaths of infants under one year old in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year; included is the total death rate, and deaths by sex, male and female. This rate is often used as an indicator of the level of health in a country.
  • Life expectancy > Men: Life expectancy for men.
  • Life expectancy > Women: Life expectancy for women.
  • Life expectancy > Years of potential life lost from premature death > Females: Female YPLL. Years lost to premature death. 

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Life expectancy at birth > Total population: The average number of years to be lived by a group of people born in the same year, if mortality at each age remains constant in the future. Life expectancy at birth is also a measure of overall quality of life in a country and summarizes the mortality at all ages. It can also be thought of as indicating the potential return on investment in human capital and is necessary for the calculation of various actuarial measures.
  • Life expectancy at birth, female > Years: Life expectancy at birth, female (years). Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life.
  • Life expectancy at birth, male > Years: Life expectancy at birth, male (years). Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life.
  • Life expectancy at birth, total > Years: Life expectancy at birth, total (years). Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life.
  • Obesity: Percentage of total population who have a BMI (body mass index) greater than 30 Kg/sq.meters (Data for Australia, Austria and Portugal is from 2002. All other data is from 2003). Obesity rates are defined as the percentage of the population with a Body Mass Index (BMI) over 30. The BMI is a single number that evaluates an individual's weight status in relation to height (weight/height2, with weight in kilograms and height in metres). For Australia, the United Kingdom and the United States, figures are based on health examinations, rather than self-reported information. Obesity estimates derived from health examinations are generally higher and more reliable than those coming from self-reports, because they preclude any misreporting of people's height and weight. However, health examinations are only conducted regularly in a few countries (OECD).
  • Physicians > Per 1,000 people: Physicians are defined as graduates of any facility or school of medicine who are working in the country in any medical field (practice, teaching, research).
  • Probability of not reaching 60: Probability at birth of not reaching the age of 40.
  • Quality of health care system > Health care system index: Health Care Index is an estimation of the overall quality of the health care system, health care professionals, equipment, staff, doctors, cost, etc.
STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Births and maternity > Average age of mother at childbirth 31.1 2010 5th out of 62
Births and maternity > Total fertility rate 1.86% 2100 100th out of 196
Hospital beds > Per 1,000 people 6 per 1,000 people 2002 15th out of 53
Infant mortality rate > Total 4.08 deaths/1,000 live births 2011 195th out of 216
Life expectancy > Men 80 years 2013 3rd out of 99
Life expectancy > Women 85 years 2013 4th out of 99
Life expectancy > Years of potential life lost from premature death > Females 2,100 2014 21st out of 29
Life expectancy at birth > Total population 81.07 years 2011 15th out of 216
Life expectancy at birth, female > Years 85 2011 6th out of 196
Life expectancy at birth, male > Years 80.5 2011 2nd out of 196
Life expectancy at birth, total > Years 82.7 2011 3rd out of 196
Obesity 7.7% 2003 27th out of 29
Physicians > Per 1,000 people 3.6 per 1,000 people 2002 9th out of 56
Probability of not reaching 60 9.6% 2050 37th out of 48
Quality of health care system > Health care system index 68.32 2014 24th out of 46

SOURCES: United Nations Population Division. Source tables; United Nations Population Division. Source tables; World Development Indicators database; CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; British Broadcasting Corporation 2014; Wikipedia: Years of potential life lost (By country); (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; Derived from male and female life expectancy at birth from sources such as: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; OECD Health Data 2005; calculated on the basis of survival data from UN (United Nations). 2001. World Population Prospects 1950-2050: The 2000 Revision. Database. Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. New York; health care

Citation

"Switzerland Health Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/Switzerland/Health

Did you know

6

The healthcare model of Switzerland espouses collective coverage through mandatory private insurance. Compared to other European nations, the Swiss are not entitled to socialized medicine. However, the government regulates the insurance industry and defines health services that should be offered. By standards, it is a munificent package that includes doctor’s visits, hospitalization stays, medications, physical therapy, prescribed rehabilitation, and in-home nursing care. This law provides equal access to healthcare. Citizens must purchase a plan from any of the 92 insurance agents. Employers do not provide insurance. Thus, people can look for policies that suit their needs.

An academician from the Harvard Business School referred to Switzerland’s system as outstanding. It is consumer-driven, inexpensive, and distributed fairly. The country’s healthcare system is number one in patient fulfilment, management and prevention of chronic ailments, and quality care. The United Nations say that the population of Switzerland is among the healthiest worldwide. It has the second-highest life expectancy globally while the United States is far below in 38th place. In other words, the highest cost of almost $8,000 per person in healthcare spending annually in the United States does not ensure the best equitable care.

Healthcare in Switzerland is not cheap because it costs nearly $5,350 per resident and increased by approximately 3.5 percent for the past two years. Yet, the analysis made in 2010 by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development revealed that out of 29 countries, Switzerland was among the most effective in achieving more effective health outcomes for money spent. Switzerland has the capacity to restrain spending while managing to keep its population healthy.

Posted on 19 May 2014

jaacosta47

jaacosta47

424 Stat enthusiast

2

When ObamaCare was approved in United States in 2010, making health insurance mandatory for all citizens, the eyes of the world turned to Switzerland. Switzerland, unlike many of her European neighbors, doesn’t have a government-regulated insurance, but instead obligates all Swiss citizens to get a private insurance. The basic cover costs approximately 350 Swiss francs (approximately $400), which equates to an average of 8% of monthly salary (for people with lower incomes a governmental subsidy is available), and covers a standard set of benefits; still in case of medical treatment or hospitalization necessary, the insured has to pay extra. This makes the Swiss health care systems one of the most expensive in the world with 10.86% of GDP dedicated towards health care. The intent of such a system is to promote personal responsibility, and while the Swiss agree it is expensive, it also seems to be effective: healthy life expectancy in Switzerland is third longest in the world (71.1 years for men and 75.3 years for women). Still, the Swiss have a couple of other advantages over less healthy nations of the world: first is it’s geographic location in the Alps- historically, sick children of wealthy families went to Switzerland to get better, especially if affected by respiratory disease. Second, Switzerland has one among the most educated and skilled workforces in the world, earning the 7th highest GDP per capita ($78,925 in 2012) and socioeconomic status is known to have significant effects on health. Lastly, the Swiss eat the most chocolate per person in the world (11.9 kg per person per year in 2012). You be the judge.

Posted on 14 Apr 2014

Luke.Metcalfe

Luke.Metcalfe

137 Stat enthusiast

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