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Country vs country: Australia and Cook Islands compared: Economy stats

Definitions

  • Budget > Revenues: Revenues calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms
  • Debt > External: Total public and private debt owed to non-residents repayable in foreign currency, goods, or services.
  • Overview: This entry briefly describes the type of economy, including the degree of market orientation, the level of economic development, the most important natural resources, and the unique areas of specialization. It also characterizes major economic events and policy changes in the most recent 12 months and may include a statement about one or two key future macroeconomic trends.
  • Exports: This entry provides the total US dollar amount of merchandise exports on an f.o.b. (free on board) basis. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms.
  • Exports > Commodities: This entry provides a listing of the highest-valued exported products; it sometimes includes the percent of total dollar value.
  • Exports per capita: This entry provides the total US dollar amount of merchandise exports on an f.o.b. (free on board) basis. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Fiscal year: The beginning and ending months for a country's accounting period of 12 months, which often is the calendar year but which may begin in any month. All yearly references are for the calendar year (CY) unless indicated as a noncalendar fiscal year (FY).
  • GDP > Composition by sector > Industry: The gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods produced by the industrial sector within a nation in a given year. GDP dollar estimates in the Factbook are derived from purchasing power parity (PPP) calculations. See the CIA World Factbook for more information.
  • GDP > Composition by sector > Services: The gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final services produced within a nation in a given year. GDP dollar estimates in the Factbook are derived from purchasing power parity (PPP) calculations. See the CIA World Factbook for more information.
  • GDP > Per capita: This entry gives the gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. A nation's GDP at purchasing power parity (PPP) exchange rates is the sum value of all goods and services produced in the country valued at prices prevailing in the United States. This is the measure most economists prefer when looking at per-capita welfare and when comparing living conditions or use of resources across countries. The measure is difficult to compute, as a US dollar value has to be assigned to all goods and services in the country regardless of whether these goods and services have a direct equivalent in the United States (for example, the value of an ox-cart or non-US military equipment); as a result, PPP estimates for some countries are based on a small and sometimes different set of goods and services. In addition, many countries do not formally participate in the World Bank's PPP project that calculates these measures, so the resulting GDP estimates for these countries may lack precision. For many developing countries, PPP-based GDP measures are multiples of the official exchange rate (OER) measure. The difference between the OER- and PPP-denominated GDP values for most of the weathly industrialized countries are generally much smaller. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • GDP > Per capita > PPP: This entry shows GDP on a purchasing power parity basis divided by population as of 1 July for the same year.
  • GDP > Purchasing power parity: This entry gives the gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. A nation's GDP at purchasing power parity (PPP) exchange rates is the sum value of all goods and services produced in the country valued at prices prevailing in the United States. This is the measure most economists prefer when looking at per-capita welfare and when comparing living conditions or use of resources across countries. The measure is difficult to compute, as a US dollar value has to be assigned to all goods and services in the country regardless of whether these goods and services have a direct equivalent in the United States (for example, the value of an ox-cart or non-US military equipment); as a result, PPP estimates for some countries are based on a small and sometimes different set of goods and services. In addition, many countries do not formally participate in the World Bank's PPP project that calculates these measures, so the resulting GDP estimates for these countries may lack precision. For many developing countries, PPP-based GDP measures are multiples of the official exchange rate (OER) measure. The difference between the OER- and PPP-denominated GDP values for most of the weathly industrialized countries are generally much smaller.
  • GDP > Real growth rate: GDP growth on an annual basis adjusted for inflation and expressed as a percent.
  • Inflation rate > Consumer prices: This entry furnishes the annual percent change in consumer prices compared with the previous year's consumer prices.
  • Unemployment rate: This entry contains the percent of the labor force that is without jobs. Substantial underemployment might be noted.
  • GDP > Composition by sector > Agriculture: The gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods produced by the agricultural sector within a nation in a given year. GDP dollar estimates in the Factbook are derived from purchasing power parity (PPP) calculations. See the CIA World Factbook for more information.
  • Budget > Expenditures: Expenditures calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms
  • Exports > Main exports: Country main exports.
  • Imports: This entry provides the total US dollar amount of merchandise imports on a c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight) or f.o.b. (free on board) basis. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms.
  • Industries: A rank ordering of industries starting with the largest by value of annual output.
  • Budget surplus > + or deficit > -: This entry records the difference between national government revenues and expenditures, expressed as a percent of GDP. A positive (+) number indicates that revenues exceeded expenditures (a budget surplus), while a negative (-) number indicates the reverse (a budget deficit). Normalizing the data, by dividing the budget balance by GDP, enables easy comparisons across countries and indicates whether a national government saves or borrows money. Countries with high budget deficits (relative to their GDPs) generally have more difficulty raising funds to finance expenditures, than those with lower deficits.
  • Labor force: This entry contains the total labor force figure.
  • Imports per capita: This entry provides the total US dollar amount of merchandise imports on a c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight) or f.o.b. (free on board) basis. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • GDP > Composition, by sector of origin > Services: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by sector of origin, which shows where production takes place in an economy. The distribution gives the percentage contribution of agriculture, industry, and services to total GDP, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete. Agriculture includes farming, fishing, and forestry. Industry includes mining, manufacturing, energy production, and construction. Services cover government activities, communications, transportation, finance, and all other private economic activities that do not produce material goods.
  • Exchange rates: The official value of a country's monetary unit at a given date or over a given period of time, as expressed in units of local currency per US dollar and as determined by international market forces or official fiat.
  • Current account balance: This entry records a country's net trade in goods and services, plus net earnings from rents, interest, profits, and dividends, and net transfer payments (such as pension funds and worker remittances) to and from the rest of the world during the period specified. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms.
  • Imports > Commodities: This entry provides a listing of the highest-valued imported products; it sometimes includes the percent of total dollar value.
  • GDP > Official exchange rate: This entry gives the gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. A nation's GDP at offical exchange rates (OER) is the home-currency-denominated annual GDP figure divided by the bilateral average US exchange rate with that country in that year. The measure is simple to compute and gives a precise measure of the value of output. Many economists prefer this measure when gauging the economic power an economy maintains vis-a-vis its neighbors, judging that an exchange rate captures the purchasing power a nation enjoys in the international marketplace. Official exchange rates, however, can be artifically fixed and/or subject to manipulation - resulting in claims of the country having an under- or over-valued currency - and are not necessarily the equivalent of a market-determined exchange rate. Moreover, even if the official exchange rate is market-determined, market exchange rates are frequently established by a relatively small set of goods and services (the ones the country trades) and may not capture the value of the larger set of goods the country produces. Furthermore, OER-converted GDP is not well suited to comparing domestic GDP over time, since appreciation/depreciation from one year to the next will make the OER GDP value rise/fall regardless of whether home-currency-denominated GDP changed.
  • Budget > Revenues > Per capita: Revenues calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Trade > Exports: The total US dollar amount of exports on an f.o.b. (free on board) basis.
  • Labor force per thousand people: This entry contains the total labor force figure. Figures expressed per thousand people for the same year.
  • Trade > Imports: This entry provides the total US dollar amount of merchandise imports on a c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight) or f.o.b. (free on board) basis. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms.
  • Currency: The national medium of exchange and its basic sub-unit.
  • GDP > Composition, by sector of origin > Industry: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by sector of origin, which shows where production takes place in an economy. The distribution gives the percentage contribution of agriculture, industry, and services to total GDP, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete. Agriculture includes farming, fishing, and forestry. Industry includes mining, manufacturing, energy production, and construction. Services cover government activities, communications, transportation, finance, and all other private economic activities that do not produce material goods.
  • GDP > Per $ GDP: This entry gives the gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. A nation's GDP at purchasing power parity (PPP) exchange rates is the sum value of all goods and services produced in the country valued at prices prevailing in the United States. This is the measure most economists prefer when looking at per-capita welfare and when comparing living conditions or use of resources across countries. The measure is difficult to compute, as a US dollar value has to be assigned to all goods and services in the country regardless of whether these goods and services have a direct equivalent in the United States (for example, the value of an ox-cart or non-US military equipment); as a result, PPP estimates for some countries are based on a small and sometimes different set of goods and services. In addition, many countries do not formally participate in the World Bank's PPP project that calculates these measures, so the resulting GDP estimates for these countries may lack precision. For many developing countries, PPP-based GDP measures are multiples of the official exchange rate (OER) measure. The difference between the OER- and PPP-denominated GDP values for most of the weathly industrialized countries are generally much smaller. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 $ gross domestic product.
  • GDP > Composition, by sector of origin > Agriculture: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by sector of origin, which shows where production takes place in an economy. The distribution gives the percentage contribution of agriculture, industry, and services to total GDP, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete. Agriculture includes farming, fishing, and forestry. Industry includes mining, manufacturing, energy production, and construction. Services cover government activities, communications, transportation, finance, and all other private economic activities that do not produce material goods.
  • Industrial > Production growth rate: The annual percentage increase in industrial production (includes manufacturing, mining, and construction).
  • Labor force > By occupation > Services: This entry is derived from Economy > Labor force > By occupation, which lists the percentage distribution of the labor force by sector of occupation. Agriculture includes farming, fishing, and forestry. Industry includes mining, manufacturing, energy production, and construction. Services cover government activities, communications, transportation, finance, and all other economic activities that do not produce material goods. The distribution will total less than 100 percent if the data are incomplete and may range from 99-101 percent due to rounding.
  • Labor force > By occupation > Industry: This entry is derived from Economy > Labor force > By occupation, which lists the percentage distribution of the labor force by sector of occupation. Agriculture includes farming, fishing, and forestry. Industry includes mining, manufacturing, energy production, and construction. Services cover government activities, communications, transportation, finance, and all other economic activities that do not produce material goods. The distribution will total less than 100 percent if the data are incomplete and may range from 99-101 percent due to rounding.
  • Labor force > By occupation > Agriculture: This entry is derived from Economy > Labor force > By occupation, which lists the percentage distribution of the labor force by sector of occupation. Agriculture includes farming, fishing, and forestry. Industry includes mining, manufacturing, energy production, and construction. Services cover government activities, communications, transportation, finance, and all other economic activities that do not produce material goods. The distribution will total less than 100 percent if the data are incomplete and may range from 99-101 percent due to rounding.
    Additional details:
    • Gibraltar: negligible (2013)


  • Retail > Gross value added by wholesale, retail trade, restaurants and hotels: Gross Value Added by Kind of Economic Activity at current prices - US dollars.
  • Oil > Exports: This entry is the total oil exported in barrels per day (bbl/day), including both crude oil and oil products.
    Additional details:
    • Bahamas, The: transshipments of 41,570 bbl/day (2007)
    • Bahamas, The: transshipments of 41,610 bbl/day (2009)


  • GDP > By type of expenditure > Household consumption expenditure per capita: GDP by Type of Expenditure at current prices - US dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Trade > Imports > By good > Passenger cars etc: Imports of Passenger cars etc, by country, in thousands USD
  • Currency > Monetary unit: Country currency.
  • Oil > Proved reserves: This entry is the stock of proved reserves of crude oil in barrels (bbl). Proved reserves are those quantities of petroleum which, by analysis of geological and engineering data, can be estimated with a high degree of confidence to be commercially recoverable from a given date forward, from known reservoirs and under current economic conditions.
  • Oil > Production: This entry is the total oil produced in barrels per day (bbl/day). The discrepancy between the amount of oil produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes, refinery gains, and other complicating factors.
  • Retail > Gross value added by wholesale, retail trade, restaurants and hotels per capita: Gross Value Added by Kind of Economic Activity at current prices - US dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Trade > Imports > By good > Computer equipment: Imports of Computer equipment, by country, in thousands USD
  • Industrial production growth rate: This entry gives the annual percentage increase in industrial production (includes manufacturing, mining, and construction).
  • GDP > Purchasing power parity > Per capita: This entry gives the gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. A nation's GDP at purchasing power parity (PPP) exchange rates is the sum value of all goods and services produced in the country valued at prices prevailing in the United States. This is the measure most economists prefer when looking at per-capita welfare and when comparing living conditions or use of resources across countries. The measure is difficult to compute, as a US dollar value has to be assigned to all goods and services in the country regardless of whether these goods and services have a direct equivalent in the United States (for example, the value of an ox-cart or non-US military equipment); as a result, PPP estimates for some countries are based on a small and sometimes different set of goods and services. In addition, many countries do not formally participate in the World Bank's PPP project that calculates these measures, so the resulting GDP estimates for these countries may lack precision. For many developing countries, PPP-based GDP measures are multiples of the official exchange rate (OER) measure. The difference between the OER- and PPP-denominated GDP values for most of the weathly industrialized countries are generally much smaller. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Trade > Exports > Exports of goods and services: GDP by Type of Expenditure at current prices - US dollars.
  • GDP > By type of expenditure > Household consumption expenditure: GDP by Type of Expenditure at current prices - US dollars.
  • Oil > Consumption: This entry is the total oil consumed in barrels per day (bbl/day). The discrepancy between the amount of oil produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes, refinery gains, and other complicating factors.
  • Electricity > Production: This entry is the annual electricity generated expressed in kilowatt-hours. The discrepancy between the amount of electricity generated and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is accounted for as loss in transmission and distribution.
  • Trade balance with US: In US dollars. Jan 2003 - March 2003
  • Trade > Exports > Exports of goods and services per capita: GDP by Type of Expenditure at current prices - US dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Taxes and other revenues: This entry records total taxes and other revenues received by the national government during the time period indicated, expressed as a percent of GDP. Taxes include personal and corporate income taxes, value added taxes, excise taxes, and tariffs. Other revenues include social contributions - such as payments for social security and hospital insurance - grants, and net revenues from public enterprises. Normalizing the data, by dividing total revenues by GDP, enables easy comparisons across countries, and provides an average rate at which all income (GDP) is paid to the national level government for the supply of public goods and services.
  • Oil > Imports: This entry is the total oil imported in barrels per day (bbl/day), including both crude oil and oil products.
  • Electricity > Consumption: This entry consists of total electricity generated annually plus imports and minus exports, expressed in kilowatt-hours. The discrepancy between the amount of electricity generated and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is accounted for as loss in transmission and distribution.
  • Trade > Exports > Per capita: The total US dollar amount of exports on an f.o.b. (free on board) basis. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Oil > Proved reserves per capita: This entry is the stock of proved reserves of crude oil in barrels (bbl). Proved reserves are those quantities of petroleum which, by analysis of geological and engineering data, can be estimated with a high degree of confidence to be commercially recoverable from a given date forward, from known reservoirs and under current economic conditions. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Natural gas > Consumption: This entry is the total natural gas consumed in cubic meters (cu m). The discrepancy between the amount of natural gas produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes and other complicating factors.
  • Trade > Imports > By good > Veneer plywood etc: Imports of Veneer/plywood/etc, by country, in thousands USD
  • Trade > Imports > By good > Pharmaceuticals excl medicaments: Imports of Pharmaceuticals excl. medicaments, by country, in thousands USD
  • Budget > Expenditures > Per capita: Expenditures calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • GDP > Official exchange rate > Per capita: This entry gives the gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. A nation's GDP at offical exchange rates (OER) is the home-currency-denominated annual GDP figure divided by the bilateral average US exchange rate with that country in that year. The measure is simple to compute and gives a precise measure of the value of output. Many economists prefer this measure when gauging the economic power an economy maintains vis-a-vis its neighbors, judging that an exchange rate captures the purchasing power a nation enjoys in the international marketplace. Official exchange rates, however, can be artifically fixed and/or subject to manipulation - resulting in claims of the country having an under- or over-valued currency - and are not necessarily the equivalent of a market-determined exchange rate. Moreover, even if the official exchange rate is market-determined, market exchange rates are frequently established by a relatively small set of goods and services (the ones the country trades) and may not capture the value of the larger set of goods the country produces. Furthermore, OER-converted GDP is not well suited to comparing domestic GDP over time, since appreciation/depreciation from one year to the next will make the OER GDP value rise/fall regardless of whether home-currency-denominated GDP changed. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Trade > Exports to US: in US dollars. Jan 2003 - March 2003
  • Oil > Consumption per thousand people: This entry is the total oil consumed in barrels per day (bbl/day). The discrepancy between the amount of oil produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes, refinery gains, and other complicating factors. Figures expressed per thousand people for the same year.
STAT Australia Cook Islands HISTORY
Budget > Revenues $504.70 billion
Ranked 10th. 7113 times more than Cook Islands
$70.95 million
Ranked 210th.

Debt > External $1.50 trillion
Ranked 12th. 10617 times more than Cook Islands
$141.00 million
Ranked 4th.

Overview The Australian economy has experienced continuous growth and features low unemployment, contained inflation, very low public debt, and a strong and stable financial system. By 2012, Australia had experienced more than 20 years of continued economic growth, averaging 3.5% a year. Demand for resources and energy from Asia and especially China has grown rapidly, creating a channel for resources investments and growth in commodity exports. The high Australian dollar has hurt the manufacturing sector, while the services sector is the largest part of the Australian economy, accounting for about 70% of GDP and 75% of jobs. Australia was comparatively unaffected by the global financial crisis as the banking system has remained strong and inflation is under control. Australia has benefited from a dramatic surge in its terms of trade in recent years, stemming from rising global commodity prices. Australia is a significant exporter of natural resources, energy, and food. Australia's abundant and diverse natural resources attract high levels of foreign investment and include extensive reserves of coal, iron, copper, gold, natural gas, uranium, and renewable energy sources. A series of major investments, such as the US$40 billion Gorgon Liquid Natural Gas project, will significantly expand the resources sector. Australia is an open market with minimal restrictions on imports of goods and services. The process of opening up has increased productivity, stimulated growth, and made the economy more flexible and dynamic. Australia plays an active role in the World Trade Organization, APEC, the G20, and other trade forums. Australia has bilateral free trade agreements (FTAs) with Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore, Thailand, and the US, has a regional FTA with ASEAN and New Zealand, is negotiating agreements with China, India, Indonesia, Japan, and the Republic of Korea, as well as with its Pacific neighbors and the Gulf Cooperation Council countries, and is also working on the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement with Brunei Darussalam, Canada, Chile, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the US, and Vietnam. Like many other South Pacific island nations, the Cook Islands' economic development is hindered by the isolation of the country from foreign markets, the limited size of domestic markets, lack of natural resources, periodic devastation from natural disasters, and inadequate infrastructure. Agriculture, employing more than one-quarter of the working population, provides the economic base with major exports of copra and citrus fruit. Black pearls are the Cook Islands' leading export. Manufacturing activities are limited to fruit processing, clothing, and handicrafts. Trade deficits are offset by remittances from emigrants and by foreign aid overwhelmingly from New Zealand. In the 1980s and 1990s, the country lived beyond its means, maintaining a bloated public service and accumulating a large foreign debt. Subsequent reforms, including the sale of state assets, the strengthening of economic management, the encouragement of tourism, and a debt restructuring agreement, have rekindled investment and growth.
Exports $257.90 billion
Ranked 22nd. 51580000 times more than Cook Islands
$5,000.00
Ranked 198th.

Exports > Commodities coal, iron ore, gold, meat, wool, alumina, wheat, machinery and transport equipment copra, papayas, fresh and canned citrus fruit, coffee; fish; pearls and pearl shells; clothing
Exports per capita $11,369.45
Ranked 28th. 26122 times more than Cook Islands
$0.44
Ranked 198th.
Fiscal year 1 1
GDP > Composition by sector > Industry 26.6%
Ranked 108th. 2 times more than Cook Islands
12.7%
Ranked 195th.

GDP > Composition by sector > Services 69.4%
Ranked 48th.
82.1%
Ranked 9th. 18% more than Australia

GDP > Per capita $37,828.78 per capita
Ranked 15th. 4 times more than Cook Islands
$8,565.55 per capita
Ranked 71st.
GDP > Per capita > PPP $42,000.00
Ranked 11th. 5 times more than Cook Islands
$9,100.00
Ranked 8th.

GDP > Purchasing power parity $961.00 billion
Ranked 18th. 5246 times more than Cook Islands
$183.20 million
Ranked 175th.

GDP > Real growth rate 3.7%
Ranked 87th. 37 times more than Cook Islands
0.1%
Ranked 10th.

Inflation rate > Consumer prices 1.8%
Ranked 168th.
2.2%
Ranked 181st. 22% more than Australia

Unemployment rate 5.2%
Ranked 88th.
13.1%
Ranked 6th. 3 times more than Australia
GDP > Composition by sector > Agriculture 4%
Ranked 139th.
5.1%
Ranked 128th. 28% more than Australia

Budget > Expenditures $556.10 billion
Ranked 11th. 8054 times more than Cook Islands
$69.05 million
Ranked 2nd.

Exports > Main exports Ores and metals; wool, food and live animals; fuels, transport machinery and equipment Black pearls
Imports $263.00 billion
Ranked 20th. 3150 times more than Cook Islands
$83.49 million
Ranked 201st.

Industries mining, industrial and transportation equipment, food processing, chemicals, steel fruit processing, tourism, fishing, clothing, handicrafts
Budget surplus > + or deficit > - -3.4% of GDP
Ranked 109th.
1% of GDP
Ranked 1st.
Labor force 12
Ranked 115th. Twice as much as Cook Islands
6
Ranked 142nd.

Imports per capita $11,594.28
Ranked 29th. 54% more than Cook Islands
$7,505.39
Ranked 50th.

GDP > Composition, by sector of origin > Services 68.9%
Ranked 55th.
82.1%
Ranked 3rd. 19% more than Australia
Agriculture > Products wheat, barley, sugarcane, fruits; cattle, sheep, poultry copra, citrus, pineapples, tomatoes, beans, pawpaws, bananas, yams, taro, coffee; pigs, poultry
Exchange rates Australian dollars (AUD) per US dollar -<br />0.97 (2012 est.)<br />0.97 (2011 est.)<br />1.09 (2010)<br />1.28 (2009)<br />1.21 (2008) NZ dollars (NZD) per US dollar -<br />1.23 (2012)<br />1.27 (2011 est.)<br />1.39 (2010)<br />1.6 (2009)<br />1.42 (2008)
Current account balance $-57,140,000,000.00
Ranked 175th.
$26.67 million
Ranked 59th.

Imports > Commodities machinery and transport equipment, computers and office machines, telecommunication equipment and parts; crude oil and petroleum products foodstuffs, textiles, fuels, timber, capital goods
GDP > Official exchange rate $1.52 trillion
Ranked 12th. 8302 times more than Cook Islands
$183.20 million
Ranked 185th.

Budget > Revenues > Per capita $15,753.02 per capita
Ranked 19th. 5 times more than Cook Islands
$3,317.28 per capita
Ranked 56th.

Trade > Exports $210.70 billion
Ranked 20th. 40349 times more than Cook Islands
$5.22 million
Ranked 170th.

Labor force per thousand people 0.000539
Ranked 100th.
0.574
Ranked 15th. 1065 times more than Australia

Trade > Imports $200.40 billion
Ranked 20th. 2473 times more than Cook Islands
$81.04 million
Ranked 166th.

Currency Australian dollar NZ dollar
GDP > Composition, by sector of origin > Industry 27.2%
Ranked 103th. 2 times more than Cook Islands
12.7%
Ranked 199th.
GDP > Per $ GDP $37,828.78 per $1 of GDP
Ranked 15th. 4 times more than Cook Islands
$8,565.55 per $1 of GDP
Ranked 71st.
GDP > Composition, by sector of origin > Agriculture 3.9%
Ranked 137th.
5.1%
Ranked 124th. 31% more than Australia
Industrial > Production growth rate 3%
Ranked 105th. 3 times more than Cook Islands
1%
Ranked 57th.
Tourist arrivals by region of origin > Europe 1.33 million
Ranked 41st. 73 times more than Cook Islands
18,171
Ranked 147th.

GDP > CIA Factbook $571.40 billion
Ranked 16th. 5442 times more than Cook Islands
$105.00 million
Ranked 12th.
Labor force > By occupation > Services 75%
Ranked 2nd. 34% more than Cook Islands
56%
Ranked 1st.
Labor force > By occupation > Industry 21.1%
Ranked 66th. 41% more than Cook Islands
15%
Ranked 114th.

Labor force > By occupation > Agriculture 3.6%
Ranked 155th.
29%
Ranked 75th. 8 times more than Australia

Retail > Gross value added by wholesale, retail trade, restaurants and hotels 171.09 billion
Ranked 13th. 1346 times more than Cook Islands
127.07 million
Ranked 187th.

Oil > Exports 312,600 bbl/day
Ranked 39th.
0.0
Ranked 155th.

GDP > By type of expenditure > Household consumption expenditure per capita 38,080.65
Ranked 6th. 4 times more than Cook Islands
10,603.5
Ranked 49th.

Trade > Imports > By good > Passenger cars etc 6.98 million
Ranked 10th. 2692 times more than Cook Islands
2,595
Ranked 103th.
Currency > Monetary unit 1 Australian dollar = 100 cents 1 New Zealand dollar ($NZ) = 100 cents
Oil > Proved reserves 3.32 billion bbl
Ranked 27th.
0.0
Ranked 133th.

Oil > Production 549,200 bbl/day
Ranked 29th.
0.0
Ranked 156th.

Retail > Gross value added by wholesale, retail trade, restaurants and hotels per capita 7,542.37
Ranked 16th.
11,790.41
Ranked 5th. 56% more than Australia

Trade > Imports > By good > Computer equipment 3.15 million
Ranked 15th. 3990 times more than Cook Islands
790
Ranked 104th.
Industrial production growth rate 3.5%
Ranked 77th. 4 times more than Cook Islands
1%
Ranked 2nd.
GDP > Purchasing power parity > Per capita $37,828.78 per capita
Ranked 15th. 4 times more than Cook Islands
$8,565.55 per capita
Ranked 71st.
Trade > Exports > Exports of goods and services 311.29 billion
Ranked 19th. 1311 times more than Cook Islands
237.52 million
Ranked 185th.

GDP > By type of expenditure > Household consumption expenditure 863.81 billion
Ranked 11th. 7559 times more than Cook Islands
114.27 million
Ranked 200th.

Oil > Consumption 960,800 bbl/day
Ranked 22nd. 961 times more than Cook Islands
1,000 bbl/day
Ranked 200th.

Tourist arrivals by region of origin > Americas 584,194
Ranked 39th. 90 times more than Cook Islands
6,475
Ranked 148th.

Electricity > Production 232 billion kWh
Ranked 15th. 7484 times more than Cook Islands
31 million kWh
Ranked 82nd.

Trade balance with US $1.43 billion
Ranked 2nd.
$-600,000.00
Ranked 116th.
Trade > Exports > Exports of goods and services per capita 13,723.08
Ranked 37th.
22,039.89
Ranked 22nd. 61% more than Australia

Taxes and other revenues 33.2% of GDP
Ranked 67th.
38.7% of GDP
Ranked 1st. 17% more than Australia
Oil > Imports 731,400 bbl/day
Ranked 18th. 1576 times more than Cook Islands
464 bbl/day
Ranked 193th.

Tourist arrivals by region of origin > Total 5.5 million
Ranked 36th. 62 times more than Cook Islands
88,397
Ranked 154th.

Stock of narrow money None None
Electricity > Consumption 225.4 billion kWh
Ranked 13th. 7574 times more than Cook Islands
29.76 million kWh
Ranked 160th.

Trade > Exports > Per capita $6,954.04 per capita
Ranked 37th. 28 times more than Cook Islands
$244.16 per capita
Ranked 126th.
Oil > Proved reserves per capita 148.63 bbl
Ranked 25th.
0.0
Ranked 133th.

Natural gas > Consumption 26.41 billion cu m
Ranked 21st.
0.0
Ranked 132nd.

Trade > Imports > By good > Veneer plywood etc 132,452
Ranked 26th. 109 times more than Cook Islands
1,210
Ranked 96th.
Trade > Imports > By good > Pharmaceuticals excl medicaments 729,752
Ranked 14th. 6031 times more than Cook Islands
121
Ranked 104th.
Budget > Expenditures > Per capita $15,454.50 per capita
Ranked 18th. 5 times more than Cook Islands
$3,228.45 per capita
Ranked 53th.

GDP > Official exchange rate > Per capita $44,474.51 per capita
Ranked 15th. 5 times more than Cook Islands
$8,565.55 per capita
Ranked 55th.
Trade > Exports to US $1.43 billion
Ranked 32nd. 2036 times more than Cook Islands
$700,000.00
Ranked 177th.
Oil > Consumption per thousand people 43.54 bbl/day
Ranked 36th.
87.05 bbl/day
Ranked 14th. Twice as much as Australia

SOURCES: CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; CIA World Factbooks 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013; CIA World Factbooks 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; All CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 18 December 2008; CIA World Factbook 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013; British Broadcasting Corporation 2014; Source: World Tourism Organization Statistics Database and Yearbook | United Nations World Tourism Organization; United Nations Statistics Division; United Nations Statistics Division. Source tables. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; International Trade Centre UNCTAD/WTO; United Nations Statistics Division. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; International Trade Centre UNCTAD/WTO; United Nations Statistics Division. Source tables; United Nations Statistics Division. Source tables; US Census Bureau; United Nations Statistics Division. Source tables. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; International Trade Centre UNCTAD/WTO; International Trade Centre UNCTAD/WTO

Citation

"Economy: Australia and Cook Islands compared", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/compare/Australia/Cook-Islands/Economy

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