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Jamaica

Jamaica Education Stats

Author: chris.lockyer781

Author: chris.lockyer781

The Jamaican education system is firmly entrenched on the premise that every child can learn, every child must. The country’s education system formally starts with what is known as the Basic school at age 3 but sometimes as early as age 2. The first recognized basic school in Jamaica, was started by the Rev. Henry Ward, in Islington, in the north eastern parish of St. Mary in the late 1930s. The school still exists as the Islington Early Childhood Institute.

Primary school attendance is mandatory for all students between the ages of 6 and 12 or grades one to six. A literacy and numeracy test is given at grade four and the Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) is administered at the end of primary education. This test helps to filter students into secondary education.

Secondary school attendance is provided for students between the ages of 12 and 19 or grade 7 to 13. Following the completion of a mandatory 5 years up to grade 11, students have the option of moving on to grades 12 and 13 or sixth form as it is more commonly called. Matriculation to the sixth form usually requires passes in 5 or more subjects in the external examinations called Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate or CSEC for short. Those who do not matriculate often take up skills training in the national training agency called Human Employment and Resource Training – HEART.

Over the last decade, a plethora of opportunities have emerged for young people to benefit from tertiary training and more significantly, associate and undergraduate degrees.

However, there are three main universities, the University of the West Indies, the University of Technology and the Seventh Day Adventist run Northern Caribbean University. There are also seven colleges dedicated to the training of teachers.

Definitions

  • Adult literacy rate > Female: Adult literacy rate is the percentage of people ages 15 and above who can, with understanding, read and write a short, simple statement on their everyday life."
  • Adult literacy rate > Total: Adult literacy rate is the percentage of people ages 15 and above who can, with understanding, read and write a short, simple statement on their everyday life."
  • Average IQ: Average IQ of different countries according to the controversial book "IQ and the Wealth of Nations".
  • Elementary school > Gender ratio: Ratio of female to male primary enrollment is the percentage of girls to boys enrolled at primary level in public and private schools.
  • Enrolment ratio > Secondary level: Net enrolment ratio, secondary level, is the ratio of the number of children of official secondary school age enrolled in school to the number of children of official secondary school age in the population.
  • High school > Gender ratio: Ratio of female to male secondary enrollment is the percentage of girls to boys enrolled at secondary level in public and private schools.
  • Literacy > Definition: This entry includes a definition of literacy and Census Bureau percentages for the total population, males, and females. There are no universal definitions and standards of literacy. Unless otherwise specified, all rates are based on the most common definition - the ability to read and write at a specified age. Detailing the standards that individual countries use to assess the ability to read and write is beyond the scope of our source. Information on literacy, while not a perfect measure of educational results, is probably the most easily available and valid for international comparisons.
  • Literacy > Female: This entry includes a definition of literacy and Census Bureau percentages for the total population, males, and females. There are no universal definitions and standards of literacy. Unless otherwise specified, all rates are based on the most common definition - the ability to read and write at a specified age. Detailing the standards that individual countries use to assess the ability to read and write is beyond the scope of our source. Information on literacy, while not a perfect measure of educational results, is probably the most easily available and valid for international comparisons.
  • Literacy > Male: This entry includes a definition of literacy and Census Bureau percentages for the total population, males, and females. There are no universal definitions and standards of literacy. Unless otherwise specified, all rates are based on the most common definition - the ability to read and write at a specified age. Detailing the standards that individual countries use to assess the ability to read and write is beyond the scope of our source. Information on literacy, while not a perfect measure of educational results, is probably the most easily available and valid for international comparisons.
  • Literacy > Total population: This entry includes a definition of literacy and Census Bureau percentages for the total population, males, and females. There are no universal definitions and standards of literacy. Unless otherwise specified, all rates are based on the most common definition - the ability to read and write at a specified age. Detailing the standards that individual countries use to assess the ability to read and write is beyond the scope of our source. Information on literacy, while not a perfect measure of educational results, is probably the most easily available and valid for international comparisons.
  • Preschool enrollment rate: Gross enrollment ratio is the ratio of total enrollment, regardless of age, to the population of the age group that officially corresponds to the level of education shown. Primary education provides children with basic reading, writing, and mathematics skills along with an elementary understanding of such subjects as history, geography, natural science, social science, art, and music."
  • Progression to secondary level: Progression to secondary level is the number of new entrants to the first grade of general secondary education, expressed as a percentage of the number of pupils in the final grade of primary school in the previous year.
  • School life expectancy > Male: School life expectancy and transition from primary to secondary for school years 1998/99 and 1999/00, published in http://www.uis.unesco.org accessed on Sept. 2002 and Women's Indicators and Statistics Database (Wistat), Version 4, CD-ROM (United Nations publication, Sales No. E.00.XVII.4) based on data provided by UNESCO in 1999.
  • School life expectancy > Total: School life expectancy and transition from primary to secondary for school years 1998/99 and 1999/00, published in http://www.uis.unesco.org accessed on Sept. 2002 and Women's Indicators and Statistics Database (Wistat), Version 4, CD-ROM (United Nations publication, Sales No. E.00.XVII.4) based on data provided by UNESCO in 1999.
  • Tertiary enrollment: Gross enrolment ratio, tertiary level is the sum of all tertiary level students enrolled at the start of the school year, expressed as a percentage of the mid-year population in the 5 year age group after the official secondary school leaving age.
STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Adult literacy rate > Female 90.8 2008 48th out of 110
Adult literacy rate > Total 85.9 2008 67th out of 110
Average IQ 72 2002 44th out of 51
Elementary school > Gender ratio 96.95 2008 92nd out of 135
Enrolment ratio > Secondary level 74.4% 2000 36th out of 93
High school > Gender ratio 103.96 2008 33th out of 116
Literacy > Definition age 15 and over has ever attended school 2003
Literacy > Female 91.6% 2003 68th out of 157
Literacy > Male 84.1% 2003 106th out of 157
Literacy > Total population 87.9% 2003 86th out of 161
Preschool enrollment rate 93.29 2008 115th out of 135
Progression to secondary level 96.1 2002 11th out of 34
School life expectancy > Male 10.5 years 2002 67th out of 97
School life expectancy > Total 10.8 years 2002 65th out of 110
Tertiary enrollment 16.4% 2000 58th out of 96

SOURCES: United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) Institute for Statistics.; Lynn, R. and Vanhanen, T. (2002). IQ and the Wealth of Nations. Westport, CT: Praeger. ISBN 0-275-97510-X; UNESCO; CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; UNESCO Institute for Statistics

Citation

"Jamaica Education Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/Jamaica/Education

5

The Jamaican education system is firmly entrenched on the premise that every child can learn, every child must. The country’s education system formally starts with what is known as the Basic school at age 3 but sometimes as early as age 2. The first recognized basic school in Jamaica, was started by the Rev. Henry Ward, in Islington, in the north eastern parish of St. Mary in the late 1930s. The school still exists as the Islington Early Childhood Institute.

Primary school attendance is mandatory for all students between the ages of 6 and 12 or grades one to six. A literacy and numeracy test is given at grade four and the Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) is administered at the end of primary education. This test helps to filter students into secondary education.

Secondary school attendance is provided for students between the ages of 12 and 19 or grade 7 to 13. Following the completion of a mandatory 5 years up to grade 11, students have the option of moving on to grades 12 and 13 or sixth form as it is more commonly called. Matriculation to the sixth form usually requires passes in 5 or more subjects in the external examinations called Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate or CSEC for short. Those who do not matriculate often take up skills training in the national training agency called Human Employment and Resource Training – HEART.

Over the last decade, a plethora of opportunities have emerged for young people to benefit from tertiary training and more significantly, associate and undergraduate degrees.

However, there are three main universities, the University of the West Indies, the University of Technology and the Seventh Day Adventist run Northern Caribbean University. There are also seven colleges dedicated to the training of teachers.

Posted on 28 Mar 2014

chris.lockyer781

chris.lockyer781

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