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Serbia and Montenegro

Serbia and Montenegro Military Stats

Definitions

  • Armed forces personnel > Total: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organisation, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces."
  • Branches: The names of the ground, naval, air, marine, and other defense or security forces
  • Expenditures > Dollar figure: Current military expenditures in US dollars; the figure is calculated by multiplying the estimated defense spending in percentage terms by the gross domestic product (GDP) calculated on an exchange rate basis not purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Dollar figures for military expenditures should be treated with caution because of different price patterns and accounting methods among nations, as well as wide variations in the strength of their currencies
  • Manpower > Reaching military age annually > Males: The number of draft-age males and females entering the military manpower pool in any given year and is a measure of the availability of draft-age young adults.
  • Military expenditure > Current LCU: Military expenditures data from SIPRI are derived from the NATO definition, which includes all current and capital expenditures on the armed forces, including peacekeeping forces; defense ministries and other government agencies engaged in defense projects; paramilitary forces, if these are judged to be trained and equipped for military operations; and military space activities. Such expenditures include military and civil personnel, including retirement pensions of military personnel and social services for personnel; operation and maintenance; procurement; military research and development; and military aid (in the military expenditures of the donor country). Excluded are civil defense and current expenditures for previous military activities, such as for veterans' benefits, demobilisation, conversion, and destruction of weapons. This definition cannot be applied for all countries, however, since that would require much more detailed information than is available about what is included in military budgets and off-budget military expenditure items. (For example, military budgets might or might not cover civil defense, reserves and auxiliary forces, police and paramilitary forces, dual-purpose forces such as military and civilian police, military grants in kind, pensions for military personnel, and social security contributions paid by one part of government to another.)"
  • Personnel: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organization, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces.
  • Personnel > Per capita: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organization, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Service age and obligation: This entry gives the required ages for voluntary or conscript military service and the length of sevice obligation.
  • WMD > Missile: A description of the nation's situation with regards to the possession and manufacture of missile weapons of mass destruction
  • WMD > Nuclear: A description of the nation's situation with regards to the possession and manufacture of nuclear weapons
  • War deaths: Battle-related deaths are deaths in battle-related conflicts between warring parties in the conflict dyad (two conflict units that are parties to a conflict). Typically, battle-related deaths occur in warfare involving the armed forces of the warring parties. This includes traditional battlefield fighting, guerrilla activities, and all kinds of bombardments of military units, cities, and villages, etc. The targets are usually the military itself and its installations or state institutions and state representatives, but there is often substantial collateral damage in the form of civilians being killed in crossfire, in indiscriminate bombings, etc. All deaths--military as well as civilian--incurred in such situations, are counted as battle-related deaths."
  • Weapons of mass destruction > Chemical Weapons Convention ratification: Date of ratification of the Chemical Weapon Convention (CWC) of countries who either declared chemical weapon stockpiles, are suspected of secretly stockpiling them, or are running chemical weapons research programs.
  • Weapons of mass destruction > Chemical weapons possession:

    Status of possession of chemical weapons of countries that either declared chemical weapon stockpiles, are suspected of secretly stockpiling them, or are running chemical weapons research programs.

STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Armed forces personnel > Total 24,000 2008 89th out of 160
Branches Serbian Armed Forces (Vojska Srbije, VS): Land Forces Command (includes Riverine Component, consisting of a river flotilla on the Danube), Joint Operations Command, Air and Air Defense Forces Command 2008
Expenditures > Dollar figure $654.00 million 2002 14th out of 62
Manpower > Reaching military age annually > Males 66,263 2008 94th out of 224
Manpower fit for military service > Males age 16-49 1395426 2010
Military expenditure > Current LCU 64.29 billion 2009 34th out of 116
Personnel 110,000 2004 52nd out of 159
Personnel > Per capita 13.61 per 1,000 people 2004 21st out of 159
Service age and obligation 19-35 years of age for compulsory military service; under a state of war or impending war, conscription can begin at age 16; conscription is to be abolished in 2010; 9-month service obligation, with a reserve obligation to age 60 for men and 50 for women 2007
WMD > Missile Yugoslavia has acquired and developed short-range tactical rockets and anti-aircraft systems, including the 262mm M-87 Orkan multiple rocket launcher produced at the Vogosca facility north of Sarajevo. Timer fuses for the rocket are produced at the Binas facility. Prior to Desert Storm, Yugoslavia worked cooperatively with Iraq in the latter's efforts to manufacture this rocket indigenously and others. The 2002 Boka Star incident included the confiscation of 208 solid-propellant rocket fuel components, as well as undocumented reports that the shipment included missiles. Belgrade and Baghdad cooperated on other military projects, including Iraq's transfer of production plans for the Al-Taw'han medium-range air-to-air missile and Yugoslavia's reported assistance with Iraq's Al-Samoud ballistic missile. There are unconfirmed reports that Serbia had a ballistic missile development program during the 1990s, which it may have abandoned due to financial constraints, while other companies were contracted though Jugoimport-SDPR for Iraq to provide for maintenance and adaptation of SA-2 and SA-6 anti-aircraft missiles. Yugoslavian air defenses extensively utilize Soviet/Russian short-range surface-to-air missiles (SAM), and Belgrade used the SA-2 SAM as a ballistic missile during the recent Balkan conflicts. Other medium-range missile systems employed by Belgrade include the Russian-made FROG-7 and the Swedish RBS-15F air-to-ship missile. The U.S. Embassy's 2002 non-paper claimed the FRY assisted both Libya and Iraq with their "long range" missile/rocket programs, sighting the presence of FRY missile specialists in Iraq throughout 2001. Other scientists from Belgrade have developed a plethora of dual-use technologies suitable for a "poor-man's" cruise missile, and are rumored to have helped Iraqi scientists convert Iraqi MiG-21 and other training vehicles into unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). In January 2004, Serbia began destroying approximately 1,200 heat-seeking Strela shoulder-fired missiles after Russia, the United States, and 31 other nations pressured Belgrade to remove the obsolete weapons, fearing they might be diverted and used by terrorists. In a related development, NATO announced in March 2004 that it had destroyed 3,000 surface-to-air missiles in Croatia. In December of 2004, however, three Strela 2 missiles were intercepted by Albanian police en route to Macedonia. November 2004 events indicate the United States acquired a S-300 Russian missile defense system from Croatia. None of the former republics of Yugoslavia is a member of the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR). 2004
WMD > Nuclear The FRY currently has no active nuclear weapons program. From the early 1950s through the mid-1970s, Yugoslavia intermittently pursued both a nuclear energy and weapons program. The regime of Josip Tito, primarily driven by a desire for international status rather than security concerns, initiated the program in the late 1940s (though the Tito regime was truly frightened by the potential aggression of the Stalinist USSR and strengthened its defenses accordingly). Belgrade collaborated with Norway, which had an advanced nuclear research program, until Tito deactivated the weapons program in the early 1960s. After India conducted its first nuclear test in 1974, Yugoslavia restarted its weapons program to "compete" with its rival for leadership of the nonaligned movement. Limited financial resources and indifference among the nuclear scientists working on the program brought it to an end in 1987 without ever producing a functioning weapon. In August 2002, 48 kilograms of 80 percent highly enriched uranium (HEU) were transferred from the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences near Belgrade to a processing plant in Dmitrovgrad, Russia. The Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia acceded to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) in 1970 and signed an Additional Protocol with the International Atomic Energy Agency in July 2005. (Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, Macedonia, Serbia and Montenegro, and Slovenia are signatories to the NPT.) 2005
War deaths 0.0 2008 192nd out of 195
Weapon holdings 3.25 million 2001 29th out of 137
Weapons of mass destruction > Chemical Weapons Convention ratification April 20, 2000 (acceded) 2014
Weapons of mass destruction > Chemical weapons possession Probable 2014

SOURCES: International Institute for Strategic Studies, The Military Balance.; All CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 18 December 2008; CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), Yearbook: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security.; World Development Indicators database; The Nuclear Threat Initiative; Uppsala Conflict Data Program, http://www.pcr.uu.se/research/ucdp/.; Bonn International Center for Conversion (BICC); Wikipedia: Chemical weapon proliferation; Wikipedia: Chemical warfare (Efforts to eradicate chemical weapons)

Citation

"Serbia and Montenegro Military Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/Serbia-and-Montenegro/Military

Serbia and Montenegro Military Profiles (Subcategories)

Expenditure 3 Manpower 11
Expenditures 3 WMD 5