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Spain

Spain Health Stats

chris.lockyer781

Author: chris.lockyer781

Troubled with financial crisis of the past few years, Spain is becoming increasingly troubled not only by increasing unemployment rates, but also reduced social security with government cuts in spending both in health care and social welfare. The country, with health care spending as percentage of GDP already bellow European average (8.1%, compared to 15.4% in USA, 10.5% in France and 9.8% in Canada in 2004) has stepped on a precipice to public health crisis: even though the Spanish population and legal immigrants have the right to universal health care guaranteed in the constitution, drawn during Franco’s dictatorship, non-registered immigrants (of which there are almost a million currently living in Spain) don’t enjoy the same benefits. Further restrictions on non-emergency care for non-registered immigrants in 2012 prevented patients with tuberculosis, HIV and hepatitis C from getting treated, by requiring them to pay for the lengthy and expensive treatments. Since these diseases are contagious, tuberculosis dangerously so, it could very well lead to an epidemic in the future years, unless preventive measures are taken. On the flip side, Spain seems to be the next favourite destination for medical tourism: the quality of health care - regulated by the standards of European Union - is high, while the cost is among the lowest in Europe. Since 2013, every citizen of European Union can choose to be treated anywhere within the Union (previously this was reimbursed only for emergency care), and a significant number of Europeans are opting for Spain.

Definitions

STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Birth rate > Crude > Per 1,000 people 10.73 per 1,000 people 2005 149th out of 181
Births and maternity > Average age of mother at childbirth 31.2 2010 2nd out of 62
Births and maternity > Future births 386.94 2100 59th out of 196
Births and maternity > Total fertility rate 1.88% 2100 77th out of 196
Hospital beds > Per 1,000 people 3.8 per 1,000 people 2003 36th out of 60
Human height > Average female height 1.662 m (5 ft 5 ⁄ 2 in) 2001
Human height > Average male height 1.780 m (5 ft 10 in) 2001
Infant mortality rate > Total 3.39 deaths/1,000 live births 2011 206th out of 216
Life expectancy > Men 79 years 2013 11th out of 99
Life expectancy at birth, total > Years 82.33 2011 6th out of 196
Physicians > Per 1,000 people 3.2 per 1,000 people 2003 19th out of 53
Probability of not reaching 60 10.3% 2050 35th out of 48
Probability of reaching 65 > Male 79.8% 2050 22nd out of 159
Quality of health care system > Cost 85.78 2014 1st out of 23
Quality of health care system > Health care system index 74.54 2014 6th out of 23

SOURCES: World Development Indicators database; United Nations Population Division. Source tables; United Nations Population Division. Source tables; United Nations Population Division. Source tables; Wikipedia: Human height (Average height around the world); CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; British Broadcasting Corporation 2014; Derived from male and female life expectancy at birth from sources such as: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; calculated on the basis of survival data from UN (United Nations). 2001. World Population Prospects 1950-2050: The 2000 Revision. Database. Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. New York; UN (United Nations). 2001. World Population Prospects 1950-2050: The 2000 Revision. Database. Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. New York; health care

Citation

"Spain Health Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/Spain/Health

  • Spain ranked first for life expectancy at birth, total > years amongst European Union in 2011.
  • Spain ranked second for life expectancy at birth, female > years amongst Christian countries in 2011.
  • Spain ranked first for drug access globally in 2000.
  • Spain ranked third for life expectancy at birth, male > years amongst Catholic countries in 2011.

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Troubled with financial crisis of the past few years, Spain is becoming increasingly troubled not only by increasing unemployment rates, but also reduced social security with government cuts in spending both in health care and social welfare. The country, with health care spending as percentage of GDP already bellow European average (8.1%, compared to 15.4% in USA, 10.5% in France and 9.8% in Canada in 2004) has stepped on a precipice to public health crisis: even though the Spanish population and legal immigrants have the right to universal health care guaranteed in the constitution, drawn during Franco’s dictatorship, non-registered immigrants (of which there are almost a million currently living in Spain) don’t enjoy the same benefits. Further restrictions on non-emergency care for non-registered immigrants in 2012 prevented patients with tuberculosis, HIV and hepatitis C from getting treated, by requiring them to pay for the lengthy and expensive treatments. Since these diseases are contagious, tuberculosis dangerously so, it could very well lead to an epidemic in the future years, unless preventive measures are taken. On the flip side, Spain seems to be the next favourite destination for medical tourism: the quality of health care - regulated by the standards of European Union - is high, while the cost is among the lowest in Europe. Since 2013, every citizen of European Union can choose to be treated anywhere within the Union (previously this was reimbursed only for emergency care), and a significant number of Europeans are opting for Spain.

Posted on 14 Apr 2014

chris.lockyer781

chris.lockyer781

396 Stat enthusiast