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Nigeria

Nigeria Agriculture Stats

Definitions

  • Agricultural growth: Index of agricultural production in 1996 - 98 (1989 - 91 = 100)
  • Agricultural growth per capita: Net per capita agricultural production, expressed in International Dollars. Net means after deduction of feed and seed. International Dollars are calculated using the Geary-Khamis formula, which is designed to neutralize irrelevant exchange rate movements (more information on http://faostat3.fao.org/faostat-gateway/go/to/mes/glossary/*/E)
  • Agricultural land > Sq. km: Agricultural land (sq. km). Agricultural land refers to the share of land area that is arable, under permanent crops, and under permanent pastures. Arable land includes land defined by the FAO as land under temporary crops (double-cropped areas are counted once), temporary meadows for mowing or for pasture, land under market or kitchen gardens, and land temporarily fallow. Land abandoned as a result of shifting cultivation is excluded. Land under permanent crops is land cultivated with crops that occupy the land for long periods and need not be replanted after each harvest, such as cocoa, coffee, and rubber. This category includes land under flowering shrubs, fruit trees, nut trees, and vines, but excludes land under trees grown for wood or timber. Permanent pasture is land used for five or more years for forage, including natural and cultivated crops.
  • Agricultural land > Sq. km per 1000: Agricultural land (sq. km). Agricultural land refers to the share of land area that is arable, under permanent crops, and under permanent pastures. Arable land includes land defined by the FAO as land under temporary crops (double-cropped areas are counted once), temporary meadows for mowing or for pasture, land under market or kitchen gardens, and land temporarily fallow. Land abandoned as a result of shifting cultivation is excluded. Land under permanent crops is land cultivated with crops that occupy the land for long periods and need not be replanted after each harvest, such as cocoa, coffee, and rubber. This category includes land under flowering shrubs, fruit trees, nut trees, and vines, but excludes land under trees grown for wood or timber. Permanent pasture is land used for five or more years for forage, including natural and cultivated crops. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Agriculture, value added > Current US$: Agriculture, value added (current US$), including forestry, hunting, and fishing, as well as cultivation of crops and livestock production. Value added is the net output of a sector after adding up all outputs and subtracting intermediate inputs. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or depletion and degradation of natural resources.
  • Arable land > Hectares: Arable land (in hectares) includes land defined by the FAO as land under temporary crops (double-cropped areas are counted once), temporary meadows for mowing or for pasture, land under market or kitchen gardens, and land temporarily fallow. Land abandoned as a result of shifting cultivation is excluded.
  • Arable land > Hectares per 1000: Arable land (in hectares) includes land defined by the FAO as land under temporary crops (double-cropped areas are counted once), temporary meadows for mowing or for pasture, land under market or kitchen gardens, and land temporarily fallow. Land abandoned as a result of shifting cultivation is excluded. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Arable land > Hectares per capita: Arable land (hectares per person). Arable land (hectares per person) includes land defined by the FAO as land under temporary crops (double-cropped areas are counted once), temporary meadows for mowing or for pasture, land under market or kitchen gardens, and land temporarily fallow. Land abandoned as a result of shifting cultivation is excluded.
  • Cereal yield > Kg per hectare: Cereal yield, measured as kilograms per hectare of harvested land, includes wheat, rice, maize, barley, oats, rye, millet, sorghum, buckwheat, and mixed grains. Production data on cereals relate to crops harvested for dry grain only. Cereal crops harvested for hay or harvested green for food, feed, or silage and those used for grazing are excluded."
  • Cultivable land > Hectares: Cultivable land (in hectares) includes land defined by the Food and Agriculture Organisation as land under temporary crops (double-cropped areas are counted once), temporary meadows for mowing or for pasture, land under market or kitchen gardens, and land temporarily fallow. Land abandoned as a result of shifting cultivation is excluded."
  • Farm workers: Agricultural employment shows the number of agricultural workers in the agricultural sector.
  • Produce > Crop > Production index: Crop production index shows agricultural production for each year relative to the base period 1999-2001. It includes all crops except fodder crops. Regional and income group aggregates for the FAO's production indexes are calculated from the underlying values in international dollars, normalized to the base period 1999-2001.
  • Produce > Food > Production index: Food production index covers food crops that are considered edible and that contain nutrients. Coffee and tea are excluded because, although edible, they have no nutritive value.
  • Products: Major agricultural crops and products
  • Rural population: Total population living in rural areas. Future estimates are from the UN Population Division.
STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Agricultural growth 119 2007 62nd out of 204
Agricultural growth per capita 100 Int. $ 2007 95th out of 204
Agricultural land > Sq. km 762,000 sq. km 2011 15th out of 206
Agricultural land > Sq. km per 1000 4.64 sq. km 2011 100th out of 206
Agriculture, value added > Current US$ $85.54 billion 2012 5th out of 112
Arable land > Hectares 30.5 million hectares 2003 9th out of 198
Arable land > Hectares per 1000 230.1 hectares 2003 67th out of 193
Arable land > Hectares per capita 0.219 2011 68th out of 204
Cereal yield > Kg per hectare 1,598.4 2008 117th out of 168
Cultivable land > Hectares 36.5 million 2007 8th out of 194
Farm workers 12.29 million 2008 14th out of 194
Produce > Crop > Production index 105.9% 2004 99th out of 181
Produce > Food > Production index 106.2% 2004 86th out of 181
Products cocoa, peanuts, cotton, palm oil, corn, rice, sorghum, millet, cassava, yams, rubber; cattle, sheep, goats, pigs; timber; fish 2010
Rural population 36,442 2030 86th out of 223

SOURCES: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 2001; http://data.un.org/Data.aspx?d=FAO&f=itemCode%3a2051, Agriculture (PIN) +; Food and Agriculture Organization; Food and Agriculture Organization. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; World Bank national accounts data

United Nations Statistics Division
; World Development Indicators database; World Development Indicators database. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; Food and Agriculture Organization; Food and Agriculture Organisation, electronic files and web site.; Food and Agriculture Organisation, Production Yearbook and data files.; All CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 25 March 2010.; United Nations Population Division. Source tables

Citation

"Nigeria Agriculture Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/Nigeria/Agriculture

NationMaster

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In terms of employment, agriculture is by far the most important sector of Nigeria's economy, engaging about 70% of the labor force. Agricultural holdings are generally small and scattered; farming is often of the subsistence variety, characterized by simple tools and shifting cultivation. These small farms produce about 80% of the total food. About 30.7 million hectares (76 million acres), or 33% of Nigeria's land area, are under cultivation. Nigeria's diverse climate, from the tropical areas of the coast to the arid zone of the north, make it possible to produce virtually all agricultural products that can be grown in the tropical and semitropical areas of the world. The economic benefits of large-scale agriculture are recognized, and the government favors the formation of cooperative societies and settlements to encourage industrial agriculture. Large-scale agriculture, however, is not common. Despite an abundant water supply, a favorable climate, and wide areas of arable land, productivity is restricted owing to low soil fertility in many areas and inefficient methods of cultivation. Agriculture contributed 32% to GDP in 2001.

The agricultural products of Nigeria can be divided into two main groups: food crops, produced for home consumption, and export products. Prior to the civil war, the country was self-sufficient in food, but imports of food increased substantially after 1973. Bread, made primarily from US wheat, replaced domestic crops as the cheapest staple food for much of the urban population. The most important food crops are yams and manioc (cassava) in the south and sorghum (Guinea corn) and millet in the north. In 1999, production of yams was 25.1 million tons (67% of world production); manioc, 33.1 million tons (highest in the world and 20% of global production); cocoyams (taro), 3.3 million tons; and sweet potatoes, 1,560,000 tons. The 1999 production estimates for major crops were as follows (in thousands of tons): sorghum, 8,443; millet, 5,457; corn, 5,777; rice, 3,399; peanuts, 2,783; palm oil, 842; sugar cane, 675; palm kernel, 565; soybeans, 405; and cotton lint, 57. Many fruits and vegetables are also grown by Nigerian farmers.

Although cocoa is the leading non-oil foreign exchange earner, growth in the sector has been slow since the abolition of the Nigerian Cocoa Board. The dominance of smallholders in the cocoa sector and the lack of farm labor due to urbanization holds back production. Nigeria has the potential to produce over 300,000 tons of cocoa beans per year, but production only amounted to 145,000 tons in 1999. Rubber is the second-largest non-oil foreign exchange earner. Despite favorable prices, production has fallen from 155,000 tons in 1991 to 90,000 tons in 1999. Low yield, aging trees, and lack of proper equipment have inhibited production.

Agricultural exports (including manufactured food and agricultural products) decreased in quantity after 1970, partly because of the discouraging effect of low world prices. In 1979, the importing of many foods was banned, including fresh milk, vegetables, roots and tubers, fruits, and poultry. The exporting of milk, sugar, flour, and hides and skins was also banned. During 1985–87, imports of wheat, corn, rice, and vegetable oil were banned as declining income from oil encouraged greater attention to the agricultural sector. In 1986, government marketing boards were closed down, and a free market in all agricultural products was established. In 2001, agricultural exports totaled $323.5 million. Exports of cocoa beans that year totaled $210.4 million; cotton lint, $21 million.



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Posted on 11 Nov 2009

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