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United States

United States Labor Stats

Background:

American are amongst the hardest workers in the world, with 67.6% of the workforce working more than 40 hours per week - only the Japanese providing a higher percentage (75.5%). US workers also registered the 3rd highest total number of hours worked in 2003, with an average of 1,792 hours, behind Australia (1.814) and Japan (1,801).

Definitions

  • Agricultural workers > Female: Proportion of employed females engaged in the agricultural sector. Employment by economic activity (%) (most recent year available between 1995 and 2001). Note: As a result of a number of limitations in the data, comparisons of labour statistics over time and across countries should be made with caution. For detailed notes on the data see ILO (2002. Estimates and Projections of the Economically Active Population, 1950-2010, 4th ed., rev. 2. Database. Geneva; 2002. Key Indicators of the Labour Market 2001-2002. February 2002; and 2002. Laboursta Database. February 2002). The percentage shares of employment by economic activity may not sum to 100 because of rounding or the omission of activities not classified.
  • Agricultural workers > Male: Proportion of employed males engaged in the agricultural sector. Employment by economic activity (%) (most recent year available between 1995 and 2001). Note: As a result of a number of limitations in the data, comparisons of labour statistics over time and across countries should be made with caution. For detailed notes on the data see ILO (2002. Estimates and Projections of the Economically Active Population, 1950-2010, 4th ed., rev. 2. Database. Geneva; 2002. Key Indicators of the Labour Market 2001-2002. February 2002; and 2002. Laboursta Database. February 2002). The percentage shares of employment by economic activity may not sum to 100 because of rounding or the omission of activities not classified.
  • Days off work: Number of days not worked for every 1000 salaried employees. Selected OECD countries only. Data for 2000.
  • Female doctors: Female doctors as % of the total - 2000.
  • Female economic activity: Female economic activity rate (aged 15 and above) in 2000.
  • Force > Total: Total labor force comprises people who meet the International Labour Organization definition of the economically active population: all people who supply labor for the production of goods and services during a specified period. It includes both the employed and the unemployed. While national practices vary in the treatment of such groups as the armed forces and seasonal or part-time workers, in general the labor force includes the armed forces, the unemployed, and first-time job-seekers, but excludes homemakers and other unpaid caregivers and workers in the informal sector.
  • Gender division of housework: Gender Division of Labour Index, 1994 Range = 1.00 (female does all) through 2.50 (equality) to 5.00 (male does all).
  • Hours worked: Number of hours worked in 2003; average of all people in employment. Note that different nations use very different practices and definitions in this data field, so comparisons such as this table are tentative at best.
  • Industrial workers > Male: Proportion of employed males engaged in the industrial sector. Employment by economic activity (%) (most recent year available between 1995 and 2001). Note: As a result of a number of limitations in the data, comparisons of labour statistics over time and across countries should be made with caution. For detailed notes on the data see ILO (2002. Estimates and Projections of the Economically Active Population, 1950-2010, 4th ed., rev. 2. Database. Geneva; 2002. Key Indicators of the Labour Market 2001-2002. February 2002; and 2002. Laboursta Database. February 2002). The percentage shares of employment by economic activity may not sum to 100 because of rounding or the omission of activities not classified.
  • Strikes: Strikes five-year average in days not worked per 1000 employees (1996-2000)
  • Trade union membership: Union members as % of all employees. Figures are for 2000.
  • Unemployment: Unemployed as proportion of the total labour force. Data for 2000-2002.
  • Unemployment gender ratio: Female unemployment rate as a % of the male unemployment rate.
  • Unemployment rate: The percent of the labor force that is without jobs. Substantial underemployment might be noted.
  • Working mothers: Working proportion of mothers with children under 6 years old 2001
STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Agricultural workers > Female 1% 2010 76th out of 77
Agricultural workers > Male 4% 2010 69th out of 78
Days off work 163 days 2000 4th out of 20
Female doctors 23.1% 2000 17th out of 18
Female economic activity 58.8% 2000 57th out of 156
Force > Total 155.46 million 2005 3rd out of 181
Gender division of housework 2.26 1994 1st out of 13
Hours worked 1,792 hours 2003 3rd out of 9
Industrial workers > Male 32% 2010 42nd out of 79
Strikes 60 2000 11th out of 27
Trade union membership 13% 2000 17th out of 18
Unemployment 5% 2002 11th out of 18
Unemployment gender ratio 105% 2001 17th out of 30
Unemployment rate 9.7% 2010 31st out of 91
Working mothers 61% 2001 8th out of 23

SOURCES: ILO (International Labour Organization). 2002. Key Indicators of the Labour Market 2001-2002. February 2002; OECD; OECD Health Data 2002 (CD ROM) available year for Australia, Japan = 1998; Denmark = 1995; 1980 figures for Canada and France are interpolated; calculated on the basis of data on the economically active population and total population from ILO (International Labour Organization). 2002. Estimates and Projections of the Economically Active Population, 1950-2010, 4th ed., rev. 2. Database. Geneva; World Development Indicators database; Jeanne A. Batalova and Philip N. Cohen, 'Premarital Cohabitation and Housework: Couples in Cross-National Perspective', Journal of Marriage and Family 64, August 2002, p.748; OECD; Figures are from the OECD. The figures are from EIRO for France, Ireland and Italy; OECD Historical Statistics; calculated on the basis of data on male and female unemployment rates from OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development). 2001. Employment Outlook 2001. Paris; CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011

Citation

"United States Labor Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/United-States/Labor

0

I am not sure where to find state level unemployment trend. I was able to find PA unemployment and NJ unemployment trends though

Posted on 01 Feb 2010

Steven Cross

Steven Cross

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