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Labor > Agricultural workers > Male: Countries Compared

Ian Graham, Staff Editor

Author: Ian Graham, Staff Editor

Countries with a high percentage of people employed in the agricultural sector are, generally speaking, poorer and less developed than those with a small percentage of agricultural workers.

In more industrialized societies, the agricultural industry tends to be more automated, with heavier reliance on machines and equipment than on human labor.

Also, in a poorer country, subsistence farming is a more legitimate alternative to low-wage labor than in a wealthier nation. Very few people in developed countries opt to pursue subsistence farming for economic reasons, though some do for cultural or social reasons.

Another factor in higher agricultural sector employment is the availability of cheap labor. Farm work is usually seasonal, with short periods of intense labor and long periods of waiting. It is easier and more economically sensible to find and use cheap, short-term labor in a poor country with low wages and high unemployment than in an industrialized nation with more plentiful employment alternatives.

DEFINITION: Proportion of employed males engaged in the agricultural sector. Employment by economic activity (%) (most recent year available between 1995 and 2001). Note: As a result of a number of limitations in the data, comparisons of labour statistics over time and across countries should be made with caution. For detailed notes on the data see ILO (2002. Estimates and Projections of the Economically Active Population, 1950-2010, 4th ed., rev. 2. Database. Geneva; 2002. Key Indicators of the Labour Market 2001-2002. February 2002; and 2002. Laboursta Database. February 2002). The percentage shares of employment by economic activity may not sum to 100 because of rounding or the omission of activities not classified.

CONTENTS

# COUNTRY AMOUNT DATE GRAPH
1 Ethiopia 89% 2010
2 Bangladesh 54% 2010
3 Kyrgyzstan 52% 2010
=4 Thailand 50% 2010
=4 Honduras 50% 2010
6 Philippines 47% 2010
=7 Pakistan 41% 2010
=7 Indonesia 41% 2010
9 Romania 39% 2010
=10 Sri Lanka 38% 2010
=10 Namibia 38% 2010
=12 El Salvador 37% 2010
=12 Belize 37% 2010
14 Guatemala 36% 2010
15 Turkey 34% 2010
16 Dominica 31% 2010
17 Jamaica 30% 2010
18 Egypt 28% 2010
19 Saint Lucia 27% 2010
20 Brazil 26% 2010
21 Panama 25% 2010
=22 Lithuania 24% 2010
=22 Dominican Republic 24% 2010
Emerging markets average (profile) 23.15% 2010
24 Mexico 23% 2010
25 Costa Rica 22% 2010
26 Malaysia 21% 2010
27 Kenya 20% 2010
Former Spanish colonies average (profile) 19.71% 2010
=28 Chile 19% 2010
=28 Poland 19% 2010
30 Latvia 17% 2010
=31 Venezuela 16% 2010
=31 Croatia 16% 2010
=31 Grenada 16% 2010
=31 Greece 16% 2010
=35 Mauritius 15% 2010
=35 Russia 15% 2010
=37 Ireland 12% 2010
=37 Iceland 12% 2010
NATO countries average (profile) 11.62% 2010
=39 Cyprus 11% 2010
=39 Estonia 11% 2010
=39 Portugal 11% 2010
=39 Trinidad and Tobago 11% 2010
=39 Slovenia 11% 2010
=39 New Zealand 11% 2010
European Union average (profile) 10.52% 2010
=45 Ecuador 10% 2010
=45 South Korea 10% 2010
=45 Slovakia 10% 2010
48 Hungary 9% 2010
Eurozone average (profile) 8.69% 2010
=49 Peru 8% 2010
=49 Finland 8% 2010
=49 Spain 8% 2010
High income OECD countries average (profile) 7.77% 2010
=52 Suriname 7% 2010
=52 Paraguay 7% 2010
=54 Czech Republic 6% 2010
=54 Australia 6% 2010
=54 Italy 6% 2010
=54 Morocco 6% 2010
=54 The Bahamas 6% 2010
=54 Uruguay 6% 2010
=54 Norway 6% 2010
=54 Austria 6% 2010
=62 Barbados 5% 2010
=62 Japan 5% 2010
=62 Switzerland 5% 2010
=62 Canada 5% 2010
=62 Denmark 5% 2010
=67 Nigeria 4% 2010
=67 United States 4% 2010
=67 Sweden 4% 2010
=67 Netherlands 4% 2010
Group of 7 countries (G7) average (profile) 3.86% 2010
=71 Belgium 3% 2010
=71 Germany 3% 2010
=71 Israel 3% 2010
=74 Colombia 2% 2010
=74 France 2% 2010
=74 Bolivia 2% 2010
=74 United Kingdom 2% 2010
78 Argentina 1% 2010

Citation

"Countries Compared by Labor > Agricultural workers > Male. International Statistics at NationMaster.com", ILO (International Labour Organization). 2002. Key Indicators of the Labour Market 2001-2002. February 2002. Aggregates compiled by NationMaster. Retrieved from http://koala.nationmaster.com/country-info/stats/Labor/Agricultural-workers/Male

Labor > Agricultural workers > Male: Countries Compared Map

NationMaster

Interesting observations about Labor > Agricultural workers > Male

Chile ranked first for agricultural workers > male amongst High income OECD countries in 2010.
Romania ranked first for agricultural workers > male amongst European Union in 2010.
Italy ranked first for agricultural workers > male amongst Group of 7 countries (G7) in 2010.
Thailand ranked first for agricultural workers > male amongst Emerging markets in 2010.
Philippines ranked first for agricultural workers > male amongst Catholic countries in 2010.
Ethiopia ranked first for agricultural workers > male amongst Christian countries in 2010.
Turkey ranked second for agricultural workers > male amongst NATO countries in 2010.
Sri Lanka ranked first for agricultural workers > male amongst Heavily indebted countries in 2010.
Honduras ranked first for agricultural workers > male amongst Latin America and Caribbean in 2010.
Latvia ranked first for agricultural workers > male amongst Eurozone in 2010.

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Countries with a high percentage of people employed in the agricultural sector are, generally speaking, poorer and less developed than those with a small percentage of agricultural workers.

In more industrialized societies, the agricultural industry tends to be more automated, with heavier reliance on machines and equipment than on human labor.

Also, in a poorer country, subsistence farming is a more legitimate alternative to low-wage labor than in a wealthier nation. Very few people in developed countries opt to pursue subsistence farming for economic reasons, though some do for cultural or social reasons.

Another factor in higher agricultural sector employment is the availability of cheap labor. Farm work is usually seasonal, with short periods of intense labor and long periods of waiting. It is easier and more economically sensible to find and use cheap, short-term labor in a poor country with low wages and high unemployment than in an industrialized nation with more plentiful employment alternatives.

Posted on 09 Mar 2005

Ian Graham, Staff Editor

Ian Graham, Staff Editor

0

In response to Chris - About 50% of the labor force in China works in agriculture, but statistical break-up showing the proportion of employed males engaged in the agricultural sectors is not available.

Posted on 08 Apr 2005

Suchita Vemuri, Staff Editor

Suchita Vemuri, Staff Editor

0

In response to 'Idiota' - About 70% of the labor force in Burma (Myanmar) works in agriculture, but statistical break-up showing the proportion of employed males engaged in the agricultural sectors is not available.

Posted on 08 Apr 2005

Suchita Vemuri, Staff Editor

Suchita Vemuri, Staff Editor

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