×

Country vs country: Armenia and Azerbaijan compared: Military stats

Edsel.G

Author: Edsel.G

Armenia and Azerbaijan have long been entangled in a conflict involving a significant portion of their territory, particularly in the Nagorno-Karabakh area, which is predominantly populated by ethnic Armenians. This protracted conflict resulted in the displacement of several hundred Azerbaijanis and the decisive victory for Armenia last 1994.

While a ceasefire was created a temporarily halt the conflict, the region has seen military buildup, particularly by Azerbaijan, signaling that the conflict could resume at any time. Essentially, Azerbaijan is seen to have the upper hand should the feared war take place; this is due to the oil-funded stockpiling of arms by Azerbaijan – a buildup which, according to analysts, Armenia cannot afford. Indeed, thanks to the former’s petroleum production, the defense budget of Azerbaijan surpasses that of the entire state budget of Armenia by more than a billion dollars.

This is not to say, however, that Armenia is critically outmatched militarily. Armenia has steadily increased its stockpile as well, with its weapons mostly supplied by Russia. By 2010, the Armenian Armed Forces has acknowledged that it possesses advanced Russian weapons which could counter any preemptive Azerbaijani offensive. While Armenia cannot afford to keep pace with Azerbaijan’s offensive power, it can, however, improve its defensive capabilities (this can be done at a much lesser cost). As such, the nation has acquired the most modern Russian anti-air missiles, including the S-300.

Furthermore, Armenia has installed no less than 20,000 active personnel equipped with the most advanced military hardware in the disputed area of the now semi-independent Karabakh.

Definitions

  • Air force > Combat aircraft: Number of fighter aircrafts (fixed wing aircrafts with combat capability).
  • Armed forces personnel: Total armed forces (2000)
  • Army > Attack helicopters: Number of attack helicopter (includes helicopters that have some attacking capabilities).
  • Army > Main battle tanks: Number of main battle tanks.
  • Budget: Annual defense budget in billion USD.
  • Expenditures > Percent of GDP: Current military expenditures as an estimated percent of gross domestic product (GDP).
  • Global Peace Index: The Global Peace Index is comprised of 22 indicators in the three categories ongoing domestic or international conflicts; societal safety; and security and militarization. A low index value indicates a peaceful and safe country.
  • Military service age and obligation: This entry gives the required ages for voluntary or conscript military service and the length of service obligation.
  • Navy > Aircraft carriers: Number of aircraft carriers.
  • Navy > Corvette warships: Number of corvettes.
  • Navy > Submarines: Number of patrol boats (includes minesweepers).
  • Paramilitary personnel: Paramilitary.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Personnel > Per capita: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organization, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Service age and obligation: This entry gives the required ages for voluntary or conscript military service and the length of sevice obligation.
  • War deaths: Battle-related deaths are deaths in battle-related conflicts between warring parties in the conflict dyad (two conflict units that are parties to a conflict). Typically, battle-related deaths occur in warfare involving the armed forces of the warring parties. This includes traditional battlefield fighting, guerrilla activities, and all kinds of bombardments of military units, cities, and villages, etc. The targets are usually the military itself and its installations or state institutions and state representatives, but there is often substantial collateral damage in the form of civilians being killed in crossfire, in indiscriminate bombings, etc. All deaths--military as well as civilian--incurred in such situations, are counted as battle-related deaths."
  • Military expenditures: This entry gives spending on defense programs for the most recent year available as a percent of gross domestic product (GDP); the GDP is calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in terms of purchasing power parity (PPP). For countries with no military forces, this figure can include expenditures on public security and police.
  • Navy > Frigates: Number of frigates.
  • Military branches: This entry lists the service branches subordinate to defense ministries or the equivalent (typically ground, naval, air, and marine forces).
  • Expenditures > Dollar figure per capita: Current military expenditures in US dollars; the figure is calculated by multiplying the estimated defense spending in percentage terms by the gross domestic product (GDP) calculated on an exchange rate basis not purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Dollar figures for military expenditures should be treated with caution because of different price patterns and accounting methods among nations, as well as wide variations in the strength of their currencies. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Navy > Destroyers: Number of destroyers.
  • Armed forces personnel > Total: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organisation, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces."
  • Personnel: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organization, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces.
  • Branches: The names of the ground, naval, air, marine, and other defense or security forces
  • Navy > Cruisers: Number of cruisers.
  • Expenditures > Dollar figure: Current military expenditures in US dollars; the figure is calculated by multiplying the estimated defense spending in percentage terms by the gross domestic product (GDP) calculated on an exchange rate basis not purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Dollar figures for military expenditures should be treated with caution because of different price patterns and accounting methods among nations, as well as wide variations in the strength of their currencies
  • Manpower > Reaching military age annually > Males: The number of draft-age males and females entering the military manpower pool in any given year and is a measure of the availability of draft-age young adults.
  • Armed forces personnel per 1000: Total armed forces (2000). Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Manpower reaching military age annually > Males: This entry is derived from Military > Manpower reaching military age annually, which gives the number of males and females entering the military manpower pool (i.e., reaching age 16) in any given year and is a measure of the availability of military-age young adults.
  • Military expenditure > Current LCU: Military expenditures data from SIPRI are derived from the NATO definition, which includes all current and capital expenditures on the armed forces, including peacekeeping forces; defense ministries and other government agencies engaged in defense projects; paramilitary forces, if these are judged to be trained and equipped for military operations; and military space activities. Such expenditures include military and civil personnel, including retirement pensions of military personnel and social services for personnel; operation and maintenance; procurement; military research and development; and military aid (in the military expenditures of the donor country). Excluded are civil defense and current expenditures for previous military activities, such as for veterans' benefits, demobilisation, conversion, and destruction of weapons. This definition cannot be applied for all countries, however, since that would require much more detailed information than is available about what is included in military budgets and off-budget military expenditure items. (For example, military budgets might or might not cover civil defense, reserves and auxiliary forces, police and paramilitary forces, dual-purpose forces such as military and civilian police, military grants in kind, pensions for military personnel, and social security contributions paid by one part of government to another.)"
  • Personnel per 1000: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organization, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Imports > USD: Arms transfers cover the supply of military weapons through sales, aid, gifts, and those made through manufacturing licenses. Data cover major conventional weapons such as aircraft, armored vehicles, artillery, radar systems, missiles, and ships designed for military use. Excluded are transfers of other military equipment such as small arms and light weapons, trucks, small artillery, ammunition, support equipment, technology transfers, and other services."
  • Conscription: A description of the status of conscription in the nation in 1997.
  • WMD > Biological: A description of the nation's situation with regards to the possession and manufacture of biological weapons of mass destruction
  • Expenditure > Current LCU: Military expenditures data from SIPRI are derived from the NATO definition, which includes all current and capital expenditures on the armed forces, including peacekeeping forces; defense ministries and other government agencies engaged in defense projects; paramilitary forces, if these are judged to be trained and equipped for military operations; and military space activities. Such expenditures include military and civil personnel, including retirement pensions of military personnel and social services for personnel; operation and maintenance; procurement; military research and development; and military aid (in the military expenditures of the donor country). Excluded are civil defense and current expenditures for previous military activities, such as for veterans' benefits, demobilization, conversion, and destruction of weapons. This definition cannot be applied for all countries, however, since that would require much more detailed information than is available about what is included in military budgets and off-budget military expenditure items. (For example, military budgets might or might not cover civil defense, reserves and auxiliary forces, police and paramilitary forces, dual-purpose forces such as military and civilian police, military grants in kind, pensions for military personnel, and social security contributions paid by one part of government to another.)
  • Forces in Europe > Artillery: Conventional armed forces in Europe. SIPRI Yearbooks 1991-2003. Conventional arms control. Last update: July 2005
  • Military expenditures > Percent of GDP: This entry gives spending on defense programs for the most recent year available as a percent of gross domestic product (GDP); the GDP is calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in terms of purchasing power parity (PPP). For countries with no military forces, this figure can include expenditures on public security and police.
  • Arms imports > Constant 1990 US$: Arms transfers cover the supply of military weapons through sales, aid, gifts, and those made through manufacturing licenses. Data cover major conventional weapons such as aircraft, armored vehicles, artillery, radar systems, missiles, and ships designed for military use. Excluded are transfers of other military equipment such as small arms and light weapons, trucks, small artillery, ammunition, support equipment, technology transfers, and other services.
  • Expenditures > Dollar figure > Per capita: Current military expenditures in US dollars; the figure is calculated by multiplying the estimated defense spending in percentage terms by the gross domestic product (GDP) calculated on an exchange rate basis not purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Dollar figures for military expenditures should be treated with caution because of different price patterns and accounting methods among nations, as well as wide variations in the strength of their currencies Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Expenditures > Dollar figure > Per $ GDP: Current military expenditures in US dollars; the figure is calculated by multiplying the estimated defense spending in percentage terms by the gross domestic product (GDP) calculated on an exchange rate basis not purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Dollar figures for military expenditures should be treated with caution because of different price patterns and accounting methods among nations, as well as wide variations in the strength of their currencies Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product
  • Forces in Europe > Battle Tanks: Conventional armed forces in Europe. SIPRI Yearbooks 1991-2003. Conventional arms control. Last update: July 2006
  • Manpower > Military age: The minimum age at which an individual may volunteer for military service or be subject to conscription.
  • Weapon holdings per 1000: . Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Manpower reaching militarily significant age annually > Males: This entry is derived from Military > Manpower reaching militarily significant age annually, which gives the number of males and females entering the military manpower pool (i.e., reaching age 16) in any given year and is a measure of the availability of military-age young adults.
  • Manpower fit for military service > Males age 18-49 per 1000: This entry gives the number of males and females falling in the military age range for the country and who are not otherwise disqualified for health reasons; accounts for the health situation in the country and provides a more realistic estimate of the actual number fit to serve. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Arms imports > Constant 1990 US$ > Per capita: Arms transfers cover the supply of military weapons through sales, aid, gifts, and those made through manufacturing licenses. Data cover major conventional weapons such as aircraft, armored vehicles, artillery, radar systems, missiles, and ships designed for military use. Excluded are transfers of other military equipment such as small arms and light weapons, trucks, small artillery, ammunition, support equipment, technology transfers, and other services. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Manpower reaching militarily significant age annually > Males per thousand people: This entry is derived from Military > Manpower reaching militarily significant age annually, which gives the number of males and females entering the military manpower pool (i.e., reaching age 16) in any given year and is a measure of the availability of military-age young adults. Figures expressed per thousand people for the same year.
  • Forces in Europe > Artillery per million: Conventional armed forces in Europe. SIPRI Yearbooks 1991-2003. Conventional arms control. Last update: July 2005. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Forces in Europe > Helicopters per million: Conventional armed forces in Europe. SIPRI Yearbooks 1991-2003. Conventional arms control. Last update: July 2007. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Forces in Europe > Helicopters: Conventional armed forces in Europe. SIPRI Yearbooks 1991-2003. Conventional arms control. Last update: July 2007
  • Manpower > Fit for military service > Females per 1000: . Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Manpower > Availability > Females per 1000: . Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Manpower > Reaching military age annually > Females per 1000: . Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Manpower > Availability > Males age 15-49: The total numbers of males aged 15-49. This statistic assumes that every individual is fit to serve.
  • Manpower available for military service > Males age 18-49 per 1000: This entry gives the number of males and females falling in the military age range for the country and assumes that every individual is fit to serve. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Arms imports > Constant 1990 US$ per capita: Arms transfers cover the supply of military weapons through sales, aid, gifts, and those made through manufacturing licenses. Data cover major conventional weapons such as aircraft, armored vehicles, artillery, radar systems, missiles, and ships designed for military use. Excluded are transfers of other military equipment such as small arms and light weapons, trucks, small artillery, ammunition, support equipment, technology transfers, and other services. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Forces in Europe > Battle Tanks per million: Conventional armed forces in Europe. SIPRI Yearbooks 1991-2003. Conventional arms control. Last update: July 2006. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Manpower > Reaching military age annually > Males per 1000: The number of draft-age males and females entering the military manpower pool in any given year and is a measure of the availability of draft-age young adults. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Forces in Europe > Aircraft per million: Conventional armed forces in Europe. SIPRI Yearbooks 1991-2003. Conventional arms control. Last update: July 2004. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Forces in Europe > Aircraft: Conventional armed forces in Europe. SIPRI Yearbooks 1991-2003. Conventional arms control. Last update: July 2004
  • Forces in Europe > ACVs: Conventional armed forces in Europe (ACVs = Armoured Combat Vehicles).
  • Manpower reaching military age annually > Females per thousand people: This entry is derived from Military > Manpower reaching military age annually, which gives the number of males and females entering the military manpower pool (i.e., reaching age 16) in any given year and is a measure of the availability of military-age young adults. Figures expressed per thousand people for the same year.
  • Manpower > Reaching military age annually > Females > Per capita: Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Manpower > Fit for military service > Males age 15-49 per 1000: The number of males aged 15-49 fit for military service. This is a more refined measure of potential military manpower availability which tries to correct for the health situation in the country and reduces the maximum potential number to a more realistic estimate of the actual number fit to serve. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Manpower > Availability > Males age 15-49 per 1000: The total numbers of males aged 15-49. This statistic assumes that every individual is fit to serve. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Manpower available for military service > Females age 18-49 per 1000: This entry gives the number of males and females falling in the military age range for the country and assumes that every individual is fit to serve. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Manpower fit for military service > Males age 18-49: This entry gives the number of males and females falling in the military age range for the country and who are not otherwise disqualified for health reasons; accounts for the health situation in the country and provides a more realistic estimate of the actual number fit to serve.
  • Manpower available for military service > Males age 18-49: This entry gives the number of males and females falling in the military age range for the country and assumes that every individual is fit to serve.
  • Manpower fit for military service > Females age 18-49 per 1000: This entry gives the number of males and females falling in the military age range for the country and who are not otherwise disqualified for health reasons; accounts for the health situation in the country and provides a more realistic estimate of the actual number fit to serve. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Manpower fit for military service > Females age 18-49: This entry gives the number of males and females falling in the military age range for the country and who are not otherwise disqualified for health reasons; accounts for the health situation in the country and provides a more realistic estimate of the actual number fit to serve.
  • Manpower reaching militarily significant age annually > Females: This entry is derived from Military > Manpower reaching militarily significant age annually, which gives the number of males and females entering the military manpower pool (i.e., reaching age 16) in any given year and is a measure of the availability of military-age young adults.
  • Manpower reaching military age annually > Females: This entry is derived from Military > Manpower reaching military age annually, which gives the number of males and females entering the military manpower pool (i.e., reaching age 16) in any given year and is a measure of the availability of military-age young adults.
  • Armed forces personnel > % of total labor force: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organisation, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces. Labor force comprises all people who meet the International Labour Organisation's definition of the economically active population."
  • Manpower reaching military service age annually > Males age 18-49 per 1000: This entry gives the number of draft-age males and females entering the military manpower pool in any given year and is a measure of the availability of draft-age young adults. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Manpower reaching military service age annually > Females age 18-49 per 1000: This entry gives the number of draft-age males and females entering the military manpower pool in any given year and is a measure of the availability of draft-age young adults. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Manpower reaching military service age annually > Males age 18-49: This entry gives the number of draft-age males and females entering the military manpower pool in any given year and is a measure of the availability of draft-age young adults.
  • Manpower reaching military service age annually > Females age 18-49: This entry gives the number of draft-age males and females entering the military manpower pool in any given year and is a measure of the availability of draft-age young adults.
  • Manpower reaching military age annually > Males per thousand people: This entry is derived from Military > Manpower reaching military age annually, which gives the number of males and females entering the military manpower pool (i.e., reaching age 16) in any given year and is a measure of the availability of military-age young adults. Figures expressed per thousand people for the same year.
  • Expenditures > Dollar figure, % of GDP: Current military expenditures in US dollars; the figure is calculated by multiplying the estimated defense spending in percentage terms by the gross domestic product (GDP) calculated on an exchange rate basis not purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Dollar figures for military expenditures should be treated with caution because of different price patterns and accounting methods among nations, as well as wide variations in the strength of their currencies. Figures expressed as a proportion of GDP for the same year
  • Manpower reaching militarily significant age annually > Females per thousand people: This entry is derived from Military > Manpower reaching militarily significant age annually, which gives the number of males and females entering the military manpower pool (i.e., reaching age 16) in any given year and is a measure of the availability of military-age young adults. Figures expressed per thousand people for the same year.
  • Manpower available for military service > Females age 18-49: This entry gives the number of males and females falling in the military age range for the country and assumes that every individual is fit to serve.
  • Military expenditure > % of GDP: Military expenditures data from SIPRI are derived from the NATO definition, which includes all current and capital expenditures on the armed forces, including peacekeeping forces; defense ministries and other government agencies engaged in defense projects; paramilitary forces, if these are judged to be trained and equipped for military operations; and military space activities. Such expenditures include military and civil personnel, including retirement pensions of military personnel and social services for personnel; operation and maintenance; procurement; military research and development; and military aid (in the military expenditures of the donor country). Excluded are civil defense and current expenditures for previous military activities, such as for veterans' benefits, demobilisation, conversion, and destruction of weapons. This definition cannot be applied for all countries, however, since that would require much more detailed information than is available about what is included in military budgets and off-budget military expenditure items. (For example, military budgets might or might not cover civil defense, reserves and auxiliary forces, police and paramilitary forces, dual-purpose forces such as military and civilian police, military grants in kind, pensions for military personnel, and social security contributions paid by one part of government to another.)"
  • Manpower > Availability > Males per 1000: . Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Forces in Europe > ACVs per million: Conventional armed forces in Europe (ACVs = Armoured Combat Vehicles). Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Manpower > Fit for military service > Males age 15-49 > Per capita: The number of males aged 15-49 fit for military service. This is a more refined measure of potential military manpower availability which tries to correct for the health situation in the country and reduces the maximum potential number to a more realistic estimate of the actual number fit to serve. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Manpower > Availability > Males age 15-49 > Per capita: The total numbers of males aged 15-49. This statistic assumes that every individual is fit to serve. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Manpower > Reaching military age annually > Males > Per capita: The number of draft-age males and females entering the military manpower pool in any given year and is a measure of the availability of draft-age young adults. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Manpower > Fit for military service > Males per 1000: . Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Expenditure > % of central government expenditure: Military expenditures data from SIPRI are derived from the NATO definition, which includes all current and capital expenditures on the armed forces, including peacekeeping forces; defense ministries and other government agencies engaged in defense projects; paramilitary forces, if these are judged to be trained and equipped for military operations; and military space activities. Such expenditures include military and civil personnel, including retirement pensions of military personnel and social services for personnel; operation and maintenance; procurement; military research and development; and military aid (in the military expenditures of the donor country). Excluded are civil defense and current expenditures for previous military activities, such as for veterans' benefits, demobilization, conversion, and destruction of weapons. This definition cannot be applied for all countries, however, since that would require much more detailed information than is available about what is included in military budgets and off-budget military expenditure items. (For example, military budgets might or might not cover civil defense, reserves and auxiliary forces, police and paramilitary forces, dual-purpose forces such as military and civilian police, military grants in kind, pensions for military personnel, and social security contributions paid by one part of government to another.)
  • Personnel > % of total labor force: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organization, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces. Labor force comprises all people who meet the International Labour Organization's definition of the economically active population.
  • Expenditure > % of GDP: Military expenditures data from SIPRI are derived from the NATO definition, which includes all current and capital expenditures on the armed forces, including peacekeeping forces; defense ministries and other government agencies engaged in defense projects; paramilitary forces, if these are judged to be trained and equipped for military operations; and military space activities. Such expenditures include military and civil personnel, including retirement pensions of military personnel and social services for personnel; operation and maintenance; procurement; military research and development; and military aid (in the military expenditures of the donor country). Excluded are civil defense and current expenditures for previous military activities, such as for veterans' benefits, demobilization, conversion, and destruction of weapons. This definition cannot be applied for all countries, however, since that would require much more detailed information than is available about what is included in military budgets and off-budget military expenditure items. (For example, military budgets might or might not cover civil defense, reserves and auxiliary forces, police and paramilitary forces, dual-purpose forces such as military and civilian police, military grants in kind, pensions for military personnel, and social security contributions paid by one part of government to another.)
  • Manpower > Fit for military service > Males age 15-49: The number of males aged 15-49 fit for military service. This is a more refined measure of potential military manpower availability which tries to correct for the health situation in the country and reduces the maximum potential number to a more realistic estimate of the actual number fit to serve.
STAT Armenia Azerbaijan HISTORY
Air force > Combat aircraft 16
Ranked 1st.
57
Ranked 31st. 4 times more than Armenia
Armed forces personnel 41,000
Ranked 73th.
72,000
Ranked 48th. 76% more than Armenia
Army > Attack helicopters 33
Ranked 2nd.
72
Ranked 4th. 2 times more than Armenia
Army > Main battle tanks 110
Ranked 2nd.
320
Ranked 24th. 3 times more than Armenia
Budget 0.405 US$ BN
Ranked 2nd.
7.5 US$ BN
Ranked 12th. 19 times more than Armenia
Expenditures > Percent of GDP 3.5%
Ranked 21st. 35% more than Azerbaijan
2.6%
Ranked 50th.

Global Peace Index 2.12
Ranked 65th.
2.35
Ranked 37th. 11% more than Armenia

Military service age and obligation 18-27 years of age for voluntary or compulsory military service; 2-year conscript service obligation; 17 year olds are eligible to become cadets at military higher education institutes, where they are classified as military personnel men between 18 and 35 are liable for military service; length of service is 18 months and 12 months for university graduates; 17 years of age for voluntary service; 17 year olds are considered to be on active service at cadet military schools
Navy > Aircraft carriers 0.0
Ranked 2nd.
0.0
Ranked 4th.
Navy > Corvette warships 0.0
Ranked 2nd.
7
Ranked 9th.
Navy > Submarines 0.0
Ranked 2nd.
0.0
Ranked 24th.
Paramilitary personnel 4,748
Ranked 76th.
15,000
Ranked 44th. 3 times more than Armenia
Personnel > Per capita 16.25 per 1,000 people
Ranked 14th. 66% more than Azerbaijan
9.78 per 1,000 people
Ranked 29th.

Service age and obligation 18-27 years of age for voluntary or compulsory military service; 2-year conscript service obligation men between 18 and 35 are liable for military service; 18 years of age for voluntary military service; length of military service is 18 months and 12 months for university graduates
War deaths 0.0
Ranked 77th.
0.0
Ranked 96th.

Military expenditures 2.8% of GDP
Ranked 3rd. 8% more than Azerbaijan
2.6% of GDP
Ranked 7th.
Navy > Frigates 0.0
Ranked 2nd.
1
Ranked 27th.
Manpower fit for military service > Males age 16-49 None None
Military branches Armenian Armed Forces: Ground Forces, Air Force and Air Defense; "Nagorno-Karabakh Republic": Nagorno-Karabakh Self-Defense Force (NKSDF) Army, Navy, Air, and Air Defense Forces
Expenditures > Dollar figure per capita $44.12
Ranked 13th. 3 times more than Azerbaijan
$15.16
Ranked 21st.
Navy > Destroyers 0.0
Ranked 2nd.
0.0
Ranked 7th.
Armed forces personnel > Total 42,000
Ranked 72nd.
82,000
Ranked 53th. 95% more than Armenia

Personnel 49,000
Ranked 73th.
82,000
Ranked 60th. 67% more than Armenia

Branches Armed Forces: Ground Forces, Nagorno-Karabakh Self Defense Force (NKSDF), Air Force and Air Defense Army, Navy, Air and Air Defense Forces
Navy > Cruisers 0.0
Ranked 2nd.
0.0
Ranked 2nd.
Expenditures > Dollar figure $135.00 million
Ranked 15th. 12% more than Azerbaijan
$121.00 million
Ranked 16th.
Manpower > Reaching military age annually > Males 30,548
Ranked 129th.
94,402
Ranked 83th. 3 times more than Armenia

Weapon holdings 481,000
Ranked 86th.
1.17 million
Ranked 61st. 2 times more than Armenia
Armed forces personnel per 1000 13.33
Ranked 16th. 49% more than Azerbaijan
8.95
Ranked 26th.
Manpower reaching military age annually > Males 23,470
Ranked 140th.
76,923
Ranked 84th. 3 times more than Armenia

Military expenditure > Current LCU 127.94 billion
Ranked 27th. 106 times more than Azerbaijan
1.21 billion
Ranked 92nd.

Personnel per 1000 16.25
Ranked 14th. 66% more than Azerbaijan
9.77
Ranked 30th.

Imports > USD 1,000,000
Ranked 95th. The same as Azerbaijan
1,000,000
Ranked 84th.

Conscription <a href=/graph-T/mil_con>Conscription</a> exists (FWCC). <a href=/graph-T/mil_con>Conscription</a> exists (FWCC).
WMD > Biological Armenia acceded to the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention on June 7, 1994. There is no evidence to suggest that Armenia possesses or is pursuing biological weapons. During the Soviet era the Armenian Center for Prophylaxis of Especially Dangerous Diseases (formerly known as the Armenian Anti-plague Station) was part of the so-called Soviet anti-plague system, the primary objective of which was to control endemic diseases and prevent the importation of exotic pathogens that could threaten crops, animals, and humans. In the late 1960s, however, the system also was tasked with defending the USSR against biological attacks. There is no evidence to suggest that Baku possesses or is pursuing biological weapons capabilities. Under a June 2005 Nunn-Lugar biological threat reduction agreement between Azerbaijan and the United States, Baku and Washington will work together to improve security and safety at the Azerbaijan central pathogen health laboratory and at the Baku Anti-Plague Station. In September 2005, 124 samples of 62 unique strains of causative agents of plague, anthrax, cholera, and other dangerous diseases were transported from Baku to the U.S. Armed Forces Institute of Pathology in Washington, DC, where the strains will be studied jointly by U.S. Department of Defense and Azerbaijan medical researchers. The strains had been collected over many years from environmental, human, and animal sources in Azerbaijan and will be used to identify pathogens in possible future outbreaks. Azerbaijan acceded to the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention in February 2004.
Manpower available for military service > Males age 16-49 None None
Expenditure > Current LCU 61004600000 252000000
Forces in Europe > Artillery 229
Ranked 21st.
282
Ranked 20th. 23% more than Armenia
Military expenditures > Percent of GDP 2.8% of GDP
Ranked 2nd. 8% more than Azerbaijan
2.6% of GDP
Ranked 24th.
Arms imports > Constant 1990 US$ 151 million constant 1990 US$
Ranked 33th. 8% more than Azerbaijan
140 million constant 1990 US$
Ranked 28th.

Expenditures > Dollar figure > Per capita $44.05 per capita
Ranked 13th. 3 times more than Azerbaijan
$15.16 per capita
Ranked 21st.
Expenditures > Dollar figure > Per $ GDP $63.73 per 1,000 $ of GDP
Ranked 4th. 2 times more than Azerbaijan
$26.41 per 1,000 $ of GDP
Ranked 8th.
Forces in Europe > Battle Tanks 110
Ranked 23th.
220
Ranked 19th. Twice as much as Armenia
Manpower > Military age 18 years of age 18 years of age
Weapon holdings per 1000 157.19
Ranked 38th. 9% more than Azerbaijan
144.12
Ranked 41st.
Manpower reaching militarily significant age annually > Males 23,470
Ranked 140th.
76,923
Ranked 84th. 3 times more than Armenia
Manpower > Availability > Females 870,864
Ranked 120th.
2.29 million
Ranked 78th. 3 times more than Armenia

Manpower fit for military service > Males age 18-49 per 1000 184.6
Ranked 44th. 20% more than Azerbaijan
153.23
Ranked 100th.
Arms imports > Constant 1990 US$ > Per capita 49.9 constant 1990 US$ per c
Ranked 5th. 3 times more than Azerbaijan
17.13 constant 1990 US$ per c
Ranked 14th.

Manpower reaching militarily significant age annually > Males per thousand people 7.89
Ranked 138th.
8.02
Ranked 134th. 2% more than Armenia
Forces in Europe > Artillery per million 75.96
Ranked 5th. 2 times more than Azerbaijan
33.6
Ranked 16th.
Forces in Europe > Helicopters per million 2.68
Ranked 11th. 53% more than Azerbaijan
1.75
Ranked 16th.
Forces in Europe > Helicopters 8
Ranked 21st.
15
Ranked 19th. 88% more than Armenia
Manpower fit for military service > Females age 16-49 717272 None
Manpower > Fit for military service > Females per 1000 245.12
Ranked 7th. 12% more than Azerbaijan
219.5
Ranked 37th.

Manpower > Availability > Females per 1000 292.48
Ranked 6th. 12% more than Azerbaijan
261.52
Ranked 47th.

Manpower > Availability > Males 809,576
Ranked 133th.
2.28 million
Ranked 85th. 3 times more than Armenia

Manpower > Reaching military age annually > Females per 1000 9.8
Ranked 93th.
10.23
Ranked 80th. 4% more than Armenia

Manpower > Availability > Males age 15-49 919,582
Ranked 125th.
2.16 million
Ranked 83th. 2 times more than Armenia

Manpower available for military service > Males age 18-49 per 1000 241.76
Ranked 38th. 6% more than Azerbaijan
228.63
Ranked 62nd.
Arms imports > Constant 1990 US$ per capita 49.91 constant 1990 US$
Ranked 5th. 3 times more than Azerbaijan
17.13 constant 1990 US$
Ranked 14th.

Forces in Europe > Battle Tanks per million 36.63
Ranked 10th. 41% more than Azerbaijan
25.93
Ranked 15th.
Manpower > Reaching military age annually > Males per 1000 10.26
Ranked 93th.
10.77
Ranked 73th. 5% more than Armenia

Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty > Signatures and Ratifications > Signature 01 OCT 1996 28 JUL 1997
Forces in Europe > Aircraft per million 1.98
Ranked 22nd.
6.5
Ranked 17th. 3 times more than Armenia
Forces in Europe > Aircraft 6
Ranked 24th.
54
Ranked 22nd. 9 times more than Armenia
Forces in Europe > ACVs 140
Ranked 24th.
210
Ranked 21st. 50% more than Armenia
Manpower reaching military age annually > Females per thousand people 7.23
Ranked 151st.
7.84
Ranked 137th. 9% more than Armenia
ISAF troops in Afghanistan > 2010-12-14 40
Ranked 35th.
94
Ranked 30th. 2 times more than Armenia
Manpower available for military service > Females age 16-49 None None
Manpower > Reaching military age annually > Females 29,170
Ranked 131st.
89,686
Ranked 83th. 3 times more than Armenia

Manpower > Fit for military service > Males 637,776
Ranked 132nd.
1.7 million
Ranked 78th. 3 times more than Armenia

Manpower > Reaching military age annually > Females > Per capita 9.83 per 1,000 people
Ranked 100th.
10.97 per 1,000 people
Ranked 63th. 12% more than Armenia

Manpower > Fit for military service > Males age 15-49 per 1000 241.39
Ranked 4th. 17% more than Azerbaijan
205.84
Ranked 32nd.

Manpower > Availability > Males age 15-49 per 1000 305.01
Ranked 8th. 19% more than Azerbaijan
257.33
Ranked 62nd.

Manpower available for military service > Females age 18-49 per 1000 265.92
Ranked 7th. 12% more than Azerbaijan
236.93
Ranked 32nd.
Manpower fit for military service > Males age 18-49 551,938
Ranked 92nd.
1.31 million
Ranked 57th. 2 times more than Armenia
Manpower available for military service > Males age 18-49 722,836
Ranked 94th.
1.96 million
Ranked 60th. 3 times more than Armenia
Manpower fit for military service > Females age 18-49 per 1000 219.57
Ranked 8th. 12% more than Azerbaijan
195.36
Ranked 29th.
Manpower fit for military service > Females age 18-49 656,493
Ranked 79th.
1.68 million
Ranked 47th. 3 times more than Armenia
Manpower reaching militarily significant age annually > Females 21,417
Ranked 140th.
71,024
Ranked 88th. 3 times more than Armenia
Manpower reaching military age annually > Females 21,417
Ranked 140th.
71,024
Ranked 88th. 3 times more than Armenia
Armed forces personnel > % of total labor force 2.62%
Ranked 16th. 32% more than Azerbaijan
1.98%
Ranked 26th.

Manpower reaching military service age annually > Males age 18-49 per 1000 10.63
Ranked 43th. 11% more than Azerbaijan
9.6
Ranked 65th.
Manpower reaching military service age annually > Females age 18-49 per 1000 10.43
Ranked 28th. 15% more than Azerbaijan
9.1
Ranked 48th.
Manpower reaching military service age annually > Males age 18-49 31,774
Ranked 102nd.
82,358
Ranked 70th. 3 times more than Armenia
Manpower reaching military service age annually > Females age 18-49 31,182
Ranked 68th.
78,067
Ranked 48th. 3 times more than Armenia
Manpower reaching military age annually > Males per thousand people 7.9
Ranked 137th.
8.27
Ranked 130th. 5% more than Armenia

Expenditures > Dollar figure, % of GDP 6.37%
Ranked 4th. 2 times more than Azerbaijan
2.64%
Ranked 8th.
Manpower reaching militarily significant age annually > Females per thousand people 7.23
Ranked 150th.
7.84
Ranked 136th. 9% more than Armenia
Manpower available for military service > Females age 18-49 795,084
Ranked 82nd.
2.03 million
Ranked 52nd. 3 times more than Armenia
NATO > Membership Action Plan > Partnership for Peace October 1994 May 1994
Military expenditure > % of GDP 4.04%
Ranked 14th. 16% more than Azerbaijan
3.49%
Ranked 19th.

Manpower > Availability > Males per 1000 271.9
Ranked 43th. 5% more than Azerbaijan
260.05
Ranked 70th.

Manpower > Fit for military service > Females 729,846
Ranked 120th.
1.92 million
Ranked 69th. 3 times more than Armenia

Forces in Europe > ACVs per million 46.11
Ranked 15th. 81% more than Azerbaijan
25.5
Ranked 22nd.
Manpower > Fit for military service > Males age 15-49 > Per capita 0.215 per capita
Ranked 23th. 2% more than Azerbaijan
0.211 per capita
Ranked 29th.

Manpower > Availability > Males age 15-49 > Per capita 0.268 per capita
Ranked 58th. 2% more than Azerbaijan
0.263 per capita
Ranked 68th.

Manpower > Reaching military age annually > Males > Per capita 10.29 per 1,000 people
Ranked 100th.
11.54 per 1,000 people
Ranked 47th. 12% more than Armenia

Manpower > Fit for military service > Males per 1000 214.2
Ranked 41st. 11% more than Azerbaijan
193.55
Ranked 96th.

Manpower reaching militarily significant age annually > Male 23470 76923
Manpower reaching militarily significant age annually > Female 21417 71024
Expenditure > % of central government expenditure 14.99%
Ranked 11th. 23% more than Azerbaijan
12.15%
Ranked 21st.

Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty > Signatures and Ratifications > Ratification 12 JUL 2006 02 FEB 1999
Personnel > % of total labor force 3.83%
Ranked 14th. 92% more than Azerbaijan
1.99%
Ranked 34th.

Expenditure > % of GDP 2.72%
Ranked 24th. 28% more than Azerbaijan
2.12%
Ranked 36th.

Manpower > Fit for military service > Males age 15-49 727,770
Ranked 120th.
1.73 million
Ranked 74th. 2 times more than Armenia

SOURCES: Wikipedia: List of countries by level of military equipment (List); IISS (International Institute for Strategic Studies). 2001. The Military Balance 2001-2002. Oxford: Oxford University Press; All CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 18 December 2008; http://www.visionofhumanity.org/#/page/indexes/global-peace-index, Global Rankings. Vision of Humanity.; CIA World Factbooks 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013; Wikipedia: List of countries by number of military and paramilitary personnel (The list); World Development Indicators database; Uppsala Conflict Data Program, http://www.pcr.uu.se/research/ucdp/.; CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; All CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 18 December 2008. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; International Institute for Strategic Studies, The Military Balance.; Bonn International Center for Conversion (BICC); IISS (International Institute for Strategic Studies). 2001. The Military Balance 2001-2002. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), Yearbook: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security.; World Development Indicators database. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Geneva, Switzerland, 1997. Data collected from the nations concerned, unless otherwise indicated. Acronyms: Amnesty International (AI); European Council of Conscripts Organizations (ECCO); Friends World Committee for Consultation (FWCC); International Helsinki Federation for Human Rights (IHFHR); National Interreligious Service Board for Conscientious Objectors (NISBCO); Service, Peace and Justice in Latin America (SERPAJ); War Resisters International (WRI); World Council of Churches (WCC); The Nuclear Threat Initiative; Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (CFE): A Review and Update of Key Treaty Elements (US Department of State: Washington, DC, Jan. 2002). Joint Consultative Group (JCG), Group on Treaty Operation and Implementation, JCG document JCG.TOI/22/03, 23 June 2003; Bonn International Center for Conversion (BICC). Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; CIA World Factbook, 14 June, 2007. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; CIA World Factbooks 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (CFE): A Review and Update of Key Treaty Elements (US Department of State: Washington, DC, Jan. 2002). Joint Consultative Group (JCG), Group on Treaty Operation and Implementation, JCG document JCG.TOI/22/03, 23 June 2003. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; CIA World Factbook, 28 July 2005; Wikipedia: Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty; Wikipedia: ISAF troop number statistics; CIA World Factbook, 28 July 2005. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; CIA World Factbook, 14 June, 2007; All CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 18 December 2008. GDP figures sourced from World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.; Wikipedia: NATO

Citation

"Military: Armenia and Azerbaijan compared", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/compare/Armenia/Azerbaijan/Military

4

Armenia and Azerbaijan have long been entangled in a conflict involving a significant portion of their territory, particularly in the Nagorno-Karabakh area, which is predominantly populated by ethnic Armenians. This protracted conflict resulted in the displacement of several hundred Azerbaijanis and the decisive victory for Armenia last 1994.

While a ceasefire was created a temporarily halt the conflict, the region has seen military buildup, particularly by Azerbaijan, signaling that the conflict could resume at any time. Essentially, Azerbaijan is seen to have the upper hand should the feared war take place; this is due to the oil-funded stockpiling of arms by Azerbaijan – a buildup which, according to analysts, Armenia cannot afford. Indeed, thanks to the former’s petroleum production, the defense budget of Azerbaijan surpasses that of the entire state budget of Armenia by more than a billion dollars.

This is not to say, however, that Armenia is critically outmatched militarily. Armenia has steadily increased its stockpile as well, with its weapons mostly supplied by Russia. By 2010, the Armenian Armed Forces has acknowledged that it possesses advanced Russian weapons which could counter any preemptive Azerbaijani offensive. While Armenia cannot afford to keep pace with Azerbaijan’s offensive power, it can, however, improve its defensive capabilities (this can be done at a much lesser cost). As such, the nation has acquired the most modern Russian anti-air missiles, including the S-300.

Furthermore, Armenia has installed no less than 20,000 active personnel equipped with the most advanced military hardware in the disputed area of the now semi-independent Karabakh.

Posted on 06 Apr 2014

Edsel.G

Edsel.G

247 Stat enthusiast

2

In every country, safety of its people is given a priority leading to the development of military services in terms of personnel and expenditure. Neighboring countries Armenia and Azerbaijan would prove that armed forces greatly affect the growth of the country not only in economy but also in social security.

In terms of expenditures, military operations are given an allotted budget even reaching millions of dollars. However, the expenditure does not depend on the number of armed forces personnel. In the case of Armenia, it has only 41000 armed forces personnel but it spends $135 million while Azerbaijan has 72000 armed forces personnel but it only spends $121 million. This is because military service in Azerbaijan is obligatory for men ages 18 and 35 the reason why there are more military personnel in the country. In the case of Armenia, only those from 18-27 can join the military either in voluntary or compulsory service. Azerbaijan is also more populated than Armenia the reason why there is more manpower reaching the military age.

How a country manages its security would depend on its priority. In the case of these two countries, it is very much obvious that military operations are given importance considering the share of military spending relative to Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Security of the country and safety of its people are significant factors in making the economy grow and develop.

Posted on 28 Mar 2014

chris.lockyer781

chris.lockyer781

396 Stat enthusiast

2

Armenia and Azerbaijan have long been entangled in a conflict involving a significant portion of their territory, particularly in the Nagorno-Karabakh area, which is predominantly populated by ethnic Armenians. The protracted conflict resulted in the displacement of several hundred Azerbaijanis and the decisive victory for Armenia last 1994.

While a ceasefire was created a temporarily halt the conflict, the region has seen military buildup, particularly by Azerbaijan, signaling that the conflict could resume at any time.

Essentially, Azerbaijan is seen to have the upper hand should the feared war take place; this is due to the oil-funded stockpiling of arms by Azerbaijan – a buildup which, according to analysts, Armenia cannot afford. Indeed, thanks to the former’s petroleum production, the defense budget of Azerbaijan surpasses that of the entire state budget of Armenia by more than a billion dollars.

This is not to say, however, that Armenia is critically outmatched militarily. Armenia has steadily increased its stockpile as well, with its weapons mostly supplied by Russia. By 2010, the Armenian Armed Forces has acknowledged that it possesses advanced Russian weapons which could counter any preemptive Azerbaijani offensive. While Armenia cannot afford to keep pace with Azerbaijan’s offensive power, it can, however, improve its defensive capabilities (this can be done at a much lesser cost). As such, the nation has acquired the most modern Russian anti-air missiles, including the S-300.

Furthermore, Armenia has installed no less than 20,000 active personnel equipped with the most advanced military hardware in the disputed area of the now semi-independent Karabakh.

Posted on 28 Mar 2014

chris.lockyer781

chris.lockyer781

396 Stat enthusiast