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China

China Crime Stats

Author: Edsel.G

Author: Edsel.G

The actual crime rate in China has so far been difficult to assess and confirm. Official statistics from the Chinese government says that crime in China is significantly lower than that of more advanced nations, including and especially the United States. Official estimates say that murder rate in China, for instance, is 5 times lower than that of the US.

Nonetheless, it is safe to say that China is relatively safe for visitors and for locals. The judicial system of the country is efficient enough to convict at least 98% of its criminal cases. The extensive prison system of the country has the second highest number of prisoners (1.55 million prisoners) and the death penalty in the country is the largest all over the world. Although a criminal death through the death penalty has significantly dropped last year to less than 500, it is still by far the largest anywhere. The highly severe punishments for even the most petty crimes and the police visibility in all important areas are usually enough to deter commission of most crimes.

However, terrorism does exist in the country. The huge disparity between rich and poor continues to feed crimes like theft, burglary, and counterfeit money. Rebellion and terrorism also abound in some regions especially in the Xinjiang province seeking more autonomy from the Chinese communist government. Corruption in many levels of the government also abound. Rough official estimates say that around 50 billion dollars are being funneled out of the country every year by corrupt officials. The current President of China, Xi Jinping, has taken serious and significant steps to eradicate the corruption problem with the conviction of key party and military officials accused of the crime.

Background:

Like most of the its Asian neighbours, China has very strict policies when it comes to crime. The death penalty is commonly used, and in fact in 2007, it carried out a total of 470 executions, the highest number that year and almost 33% more than the next most active nation, Iran. The prisons are still busy, however, with China boasting over 1.5 million prisoners, the 2nd largest prisoner population behind the US. However, its prisoners per capita rate of just 119 per 100,000 of the population is very respectable, and far behind the US' rate of 715.

Definitions

  • Assault rate: Number of assaults recorded by police per 100,000 population
  • Assaults: Number of assaults recorded by police in that country per 100,000 population.
  • Auto theft: Number of motor vehicle thefts (car thefts) recorded by police in that country per 100,000 population.
  • Burglaries: Number of burglaries recorded by police in that country per 100,000 population.
  • Drug offences: Drug offence cases per 100,000 population (2000).
  • Executions: Number of known executions in the country (Data is for 2007). Because these figures include only documented cases; the true figures are likely to be higher in many countries.
  • Illicit drugs: Crime statistics are often better indicators of prevalence of law enforcement and willingness to report crime, than actual prevalence.
  • Murder rate: Homicide rate per year per 100,000 inhabitants in various countries.
  • Murders > WHO: Intentional homicide rate is the estimate of intentional homicides in a country as a result of domestic disputes that end in a killing, interpersonal violence, violent conflicts over land resources, inter-gang violence over turf or control, and predatory violence and killing by armed groups. The term, intentional homicide, is broad, but it does not include all intentional killing. In particular, deaths arising from armed conflict are usually considered separately. The difference is usually described by the organisation of the killing. Individuals or small groups usually commit homicide, whereas the killing in armed conflict is usually committed by more or less cohesive groups of up to several hundred members. Two main sources of data are presented: criminal justice (law enforcement) measures (this series), supplemented by data from national statistical agencies, and measures from public health sources (see other intentional homicide series). These various sources measure slightly different phenomena and are therefore unlikely to provide identical numbers."
  • Prisoners: Total persons incarcerated
  • Prisoners > Female: Female prisoners, expressed as a percentage share of the total prison population. Data for 2003.
  • Prisoners > Per capita: Data for 2003. Number of prisoners held per 100,000 population.
  • Rapes: Number of sexual assaults recorded by police in that country per 100,000 population.
  • Robberies: Number of robberies recorded by police in that country per 100,000 population.
  • Software piracy rate: The piracy rate is the total number of units of pirated software deployed in 2007 divided by the total units of software installed.
STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Assault rate 9.5 2011 83th out of 93
Assaults 9.5 2000 10th out of 13
Auto theft 35.5 2000 5th out of 13
Burglaries 90.7 2000 5th out of 10
Drug offences 3.9 per 100,000 people 2000 59th out of 60
Executions 470 executions 2007 1st out of 38
Illicit drugs major transshipment point for heroin produced in the Golden Triangle region of Southeast Asia; growing domestic drug abuse problem; source country for chemical precursors, despite new regulations on its large chemical industry 2011
Murder rate 1.2 2007
Murders > WHO 1.9 2004 131st out of 184
Prisoners 1.55 million prisoners 2002 2nd out of 168
Prisoners > Female 4.4% 2003 57th out of 134
Prisoners > Per capita 119 per 100,000 people 2003 71st out of 164
Rapes 2.8 2000 10th out of 14
Robberies 24.5 2000 9th out of 11
Software piracy rate 82% 2007 18th out of 106

SOURCES: European Institute for Crime Prevention and Control International Statistics on Crime and Justice, 2011; European Institute for Crime Prevention and Control International Statistics on Crime and Justice, 2011; The Eighth United Nations Survey on Crime Trends and the Operations of Criminal Justice Systems (2002) (United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Centre for International Crime Prevention); Amnesty International; CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; World Health Organisation.; The Eighth United Nations Survey on Crime Trends and the Operations of Criminal Justice Systems (2002) (United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Centre for International Crime Prevention); International Centre for Prison Studies - World Prison Brief; Fifth Annual BSA and IDC Global Software Piracy Study

Citation

"China Crime Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/China/Crime

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The actual crime rate in China has so far been difficult to assess and confirm. Official statistics from the Chinese government says that crime in China is significantly lower than that of more advanced nations, including and especially the United States. Official estimates say that murder rate in China, for instance, is 5 times lower than that of the US.

Nonetheless, it is safe to say that China is relatively safe for visitors and for locals. The judicial system of the country is efficient enough to convict at least 98% of its criminal cases. The extensive prison system of the country has the second highest number of prisoners (1.55 million prisoners) and the death penalty in the country is the largest all over the world. Although a criminal death through the death penalty has significantly dropped last year to less than 500, it is still by far the largest anywhere. The highly severe punishments for even the most petty crimes and the police visibility in all important areas are usually enough to deter commission of most crimes.

However, terrorism does exist in the country. The huge disparity between rich and poor continues to feed crimes like theft, burglary, and counterfeit money. Rebellion and terrorism also abound in some regions especially in the Xinjiang province seeking more autonomy from the Chinese communist government. Corruption in many levels of the government also abound. Rough official estimates say that around 50 billion dollars are being funneled out of the country every year by corrupt officials. The current President of China, Xi Jinping, has taken serious and significant steps to eradicate the corruption problem with the conviction of key party and military officials accused of the crime.

Posted on 06 Apr 2014

Edsel.G

Edsel.G

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