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Mexico

Mexico Government Stats

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Author: chris.lockyer781

Mexico or the United Mexican States is composed of 31 states and a single federal district. The country is governed by the federal republic under a centralized government. The President is the head of state and the executive branch. The other two branches are the legislative and judicial. The Chamber of Deputies is composed of 500 deputies elected during free elections every three years. 300 of them are elected in so-called single seat constituencies while the other 200 are voted according to the principle of proportional representation.

Mexico has always remained neutral during global conflicts. However, there were political parties that have made proposals for the amendment of the constitution so the Mexican armed forces can cooperate with the United Nations for international peacekeeping missions. The nation is also one of the founders of international organizations like the United Nations, Organization of American States and Organization of Ibero-American States.

Profile:

The rejuvenated Institutional Revolutionary Party returned to power in 2012 with a clear win in presidential elections by Enrique Pena Nieto.

He beat veteran leftwinger Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, and drove Josefina Vazquez Mota of the rightwing National Action Party (PAN) into a distant third place. This ended 12 years of PAN rule.

Born in 1966, Mr Pena Nieto began his political career in his twenties, working for the PRI and in the local government system in Mexico State, the country's most populous state, rising to win the gubernatorial election in 2005.

He won praise for his expansion of the transport and healthcare system and careful financial management during his six years as governor of Mexico State, which helped win him the PRI presidential nomination and the election itself.

When he becomes president in December, Mr Pena Nieto will have to face the escalating violence of the drugs war in the northern states.

He has pledged no return to the PRI's pre-2000 policy of tolerating drug cartels in return for civil peace, and has announced plans to establish a special paramilitary police force to fight the drug barons alongside a stronger army presence.

The first major success of this change in policy came with the resst in July 2013 of Miguel Angel Trevino Morales, the head of the brutal Zetas cartel, wanted in both Mexico and the United States for ordering massacres and trafficking on a global scale.

Definitions

  • Administrative divisions: This entry generally gives the numbers, designatory terms, and first-order administrative divisions as approved by the US Board on Geographic Names (BGN). Changes that have been reported but not yet acted on by BGN are noted.
  • Capital city > Geographic coordinates: This entry gives the name of the seat of government, its geographic coordinates, the time difference relative to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) and the time observed in Washington, DC, and, if applicable, information on daylight saving time (DST). Where appropriate, a special note has been added to highlight those countries that have multiple time zones.
  • Capital city > Name: This entry gives the name of the seat of government, its geographic coordinates, the time difference relative to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) and the time observed in Washington, DC, and, if applicable, information on daylight saving time (DST). Where appropriate, a special note has been added to highlight those countries that have multiple time zones.
  • Constitution: The dates of adoption, revisions, and major amendments to a nation's constitution
  • Country name > Conventional long form: This entry is derived from Government > Country name, which includes all forms of the country's name approved by the US Board on Geographic Names (Italy is used as an example): conventional long form (Italian Republic), conventional short form (Italy), local long form (Repubblica Italiana), local short form (Italia), former (Kingdom of Italy), as well as the abbreviation. Also see the Terminology note.
  • Diplomatic representation from the US > Mailing address: This entry includes the chief of mission, embassy address, mailing address, telephone number, FAX number, branch office locations, consulate general locations, and consulate locations.
  • Executive branch > Cabinet: Cabinet includes the official name for any body of high-ranking advisers roughly comparable to a U.S. Cabinet. Also notes the method for selection of members.
  • Government type: A description of the basic form of government (e.g., republic, constitutional monarchy, federal republic, parliamentary democracy, military dictatorship).
  • International organization participation: This entry lists in alphabetical order by abbreviation those international organizations in which the subject country is a member or participates in some other way.
  • Judicial branch: The name(s) of the highest court(s) and a brief description of the selection process for members.
  • Legal system: A brief description of the legal system's historical roots, role in government, and acceptance of International Court of Justice (ICJ) jurisdiction.
  • Legislative branch: This entry contains information on the structure (unicameral, bicameral, tricameral), formal name, number of seats, and term of office. Elections includes the nature of election process or accession to power, date of the last election, and date of the next election. Election results includes the percent of vote and/or number of seats held by each party in the last election.
  • Political parties and leaders: Significant political organizations and their leaders.
  • Political pressure groups and leaders: Organizations with leaders involved in politics, but not standing for legislative election.
  • Suffrage: The age at enfranchisement and whether the right to vote is universal or restricted
STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Administrative divisions 31 states (estados, singular - estado) and 1 federal district* (distrito federal); Aguascalientes, Baja California, Baja California Sur, Campeche, Chiapas, Chihuahua, Coahuila de Zaragoza, Colima, Distrito Federal*, Durango, Guanajuato, Guerrero, Hidalgo, Jalisco, Mexico, Michoacan de Ocampo, Morelos, Nayarit, Nuevo Leon, Oaxaca, Puebla, Queretaro de Arteaga, Quintana Roo, San Luis Potosi, Sinaloa, Sonora, Tabasco, Tamaulipas, Tlaxcala, Veracruz de Ignacio de la Llave (Veracruz), Yucatan, Zacatecas 2013
Capital city > Geographic coordinates 19 26 N, 99 08 W 2008
Capital city > Name Mexico (Distrito Federal) 2011
Constitution several previous; latest approved 5 February 1917; amended many times, last in 2012 2012
Country name > Conventional long form United Mexican States 2013
Diplomatic representation from the US > Mailing address P. O. Box 9000, Brownsville, TX 78520-9000 2013
Executive branch > Cabinet Cabinet appointed by the president 2013
Government type federal republic 2013
International organization participation APEC, BCIE, BIS, CAN (observer), Caricom (observer), CD, CDB, CE (observer), CELAC, CSN (observer), EBRD, FAO, FATF, G-20, G-3, G-15, G-24, IADB, IAEA, IBRD, ICAO, ICC (national committees), ICRM, IDA, IFAD, IFC, IFRCS, IHO, ILO, IMF, IMO, IMSO, Interpol, IOC, IOM, IPU, ISO, ITSO, ITU, ITUC (NGOs), LAES, LAIA, MIGA, NAFTA, NAM (observer), NEA, OAS, OECD, OPANAL, OPCW, Paris Club (associate), PCA, SICA (observer), UN, UNASUR (observer), UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNHCR, UNIDO, Union Latina (observer), UNWTO, UPU, WCO, WFTU (NGOs), WHO, WIPO, WMO, WTO 2013
Judicial branch Supreme Court of Justice or Suprema Corte de Justicia de la Nacion (justices or ministros are appointed by the president with consent of the Senate) 2012
Legal system civil law system with US constitutional law theory influence; judicial review of legislative acts 2013
Legislative branch bicameral National Congress or Congreso de la Union consists of the Senate or Camara de Senadores 2011
Political parties and leaders Citizen's Movement (Movimiento Ciudadano) [Luis WALTON Aburto]
Institutional Revolutionary Party (Partido Revolucionario Institucional) or PRI [Cesar CAMACHO Quiroz]
Labor Party (Partido del Trabajo) or PT [Alberto ANAYA Gutierrez]
Mexican Green Ecological Party (Partido Verde Ecologista de Mexico) or PVEM [vacant]
National Action Party (Partido Accion Nacional) or PAN [Gustavo MADERO Munoz]
New Alliance Party (Partido Nueva Alianza) or PNA/PANAL [Luis CASTRO Obregon]
Party of the Democratic Revolution (Partido de la Revolucion Democratica) or PRD [Jesus ZAMBRANO Grijalva]
2013
Political pressure groups and leaders Businessmen's Coordinating Council or CCE
Confederation of Employers of the Mexican Republic or COPARMEX
Confederation of Industrial Chambers or CONCAMIN
Confederation of Mexican Workers or CTM
Confederation of National Chambers of Commerce or CONCANACO
Coordinator for Foreign Trade Business Organizations or COECE
Federation of Unions Providing Goods and Services or FESEBES
National Chamber of Transformation Industries or CANACINTRA
National Peasant Confederation or CNC
National Small Business Chamber or CANACOPE
National Syndicate of Education Workers or SNTE
National Union of Workers or UNT
Popular Assembly of the People of Oaxaca or APPO
Roman Catholic Church
2013
Suffrage 18 years of age; universal and compulsory (but not enforced) 2013

SOURCES: CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; CIA World Factbooks 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

Citation

"Mexico Government Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/Mexico/Government

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Mexico or the United Mexican States is composed of 31 states and a single federal district. The country is governed by the federal republic under a centralized government. The President is the head of state and the executive branch. The other two branches are the legislative and judicial. The Chamber of Deputies is composed of 500 deputies elected during free elections every three years. 300 of them are elected in so-called single seat constituencies while the other 200 are voted according to the principle of proportional representation.

Mexico has always remained neutral during global conflicts. However, there were political parties that have made proposals for the amendment of the constitution so the Mexican armed forces can cooperate with the United Nations for international peacekeeping missions. The nation is also one of the founders of international organizations like the United Nations, Organization of American States and Organization of Ibero-American States.

Posted on 09 Apr 2014

chris.lockyer781

chris.lockyer781

396 Stat enthusiast