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Country vs country: Japan and Luxembourg compared: Economy

Definitions

  • Companies > Listed domestic companies, total per million: Listed domestic companies, total. Listed domestic companies are the domestically incorporated companies listed on the country's stock exchanges at the end of the year. This indicator does not include investment companies, mutual funds, or other collective investment vehicles. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Debt > External: Total public and private debt owed to non-residents repayable in foreign currency, goods, or services.
  • Distribution of family income > Gini index: This index measures the degree of inequality in the distribution of family income in a country. The index is calculated from the Lorenz curve, in which cumulative family income is plotted against the number of families arranged from the poorest to the ric
  • GDP: GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Dollar figures for GDP are converted from domestic currencies using single year official exchange rates. For a few countries where the official exchange rate does not reflect the rate effectively applied to actual foreign exchange transactions, an alternative conversion factor is used.
  • GDP > Composition, by end use > Exports of goods and services: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by end use, which shows who does the spending in an economy: consumers, businesses, government, and foreigners. The distribution gives the percentage contribution to total GDP of household consumption, government consumption, investment in fixed capital, investment in inventories, exports of goods and services, and imports of goods and services, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete.
    household consumption consists of expenditures by resident households, and by nonprofit institutions that serve households, on goods and services that are consumed by individuals. This includes consumption of both domestically produced and foreign goods and services.
    government consumption consists of government expenditures on goods and services. These figures exclude government transfer payments, such as interest on debt, unemployment, and social security, since such payments are not made in exchange for goods and services supplied.
    investment in fixed capital consists of total business spending on fixed assets, such as factories, machinery, equipment, dwellings, and inventories of raw materials, which provide the basis for future production. It is measured gross of the depreciation of the assets, i.e., it includes investment that merely replaces worn-out or scrapped capital. Earlier editions of The World Factbook referred to this concept as Investment (gross fixed) and that data now have been moved to this new field.
    investment in inventories consists of net changes to the stock of outputs that are still held by the units that produce them, awaiting further sale to an end user, such as automobiles sitting on a dealer’s lot or groceries on the store shelves. This figure may be positive or negative. If the stock of unsold output increases during the relevant time period, investment in inventories is positive, but, if the stock of unsold goods declines, it will be negative. Investment in inventories normally is an early indicator of the state of the economy. If the stock of unsold items increases unexpectedly – because people stop buying - the economy may be entering a recession; but if the stock of unsold items falls - and goods "go flying off the shelves" - businesses normally try to replace those stocks, and the economy is likely to accelerate.
    exports of goods and services consist of sales, barter, gifts, or grants of goods and services from residents to nonresidents.
    imports of goods and ...
    Full definition
     .
  • GDP > Composition, by end use > Investment in inventories: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by end use, which shows who does the spending in an economy: consumers, businesses, government, and foreigners. The distribution gives the percentage contribution to total GDP of household consumption, government consumption, investment in fixed capital, investment in inventories, exports of goods and services, and imports of goods and services, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete.
    household consumption consists of expenditures by resident households, and by nonprofit institutions that serve households, on goods and services that are consumed by individuals. This includes consumption of both domestically produced and foreign goods and services.
    government consumption consists of government expenditures on goods and services. These figures exclude government transfer payments, such as interest on debt, unemployment, and social security, since such payments are not made in exchange for goods and services supplied.
    investment in fixed capital consists of total business spending on fixed assets, such as factories, machinery, equipment, dwellings, and inventories of raw materials, which provide the basis for future production. It is measured gross of the depreciation of the assets, i.e., it includes investment that merely replaces worn-out or scrapped capital. Earlier editions of The World Factbook referred to this concept as Investment (gross fixed) and that data now have been moved to this new field.
    investment in inventories consists of net changes to the stock of outputs that are still held by the units that produce them, awaiting further sale to an end user, such as automobiles sitting on a dealer’s lot or groceries on the store shelves. This figure may be positive or negative. If the stock of unsold output increases during the relevant time period, investment in inventories is positive, but, if the stock of unsold goods declines, it will be negative. Investment in inventories normally is an early indicator of the state of the economy. If the stock of unsold items increases unexpectedly – because people stop buying - the economy may be entering a recession; but if the stock of unsold items falls - and goods "go flying off the shelves" - businesses normally try to replace those stocks, and the economy is likely to accelerate.
    exports of goods and services consist of sales, barter, gifts, or grants of goods and services from residents to nonresidents.
    imports of goods and ...
    Full definition
  • GDP > Real growth rate: GDP growth on an annual basis adjusted for inflation and expressed as a percent.
  • GDP per capita: GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Dollar figures for GDP are converted from domestic currencies using single year official exchange rates. For a few countries where the official exchange rate does not reflect the rate effectively applied to actual foreign exchange transactions, an alternative conversion factor is used. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • GINI index: Gini index measures the extent to which the distribution of income (or, in some cases, consumption expenditure) among individuals or households within an economy deviates from a perfectly equal distribution. A Lorenz curve plots the cumulative percentages of total income received against the cumulative number of recipients, starting with the poorest individual or household. The Gini index measures the area between the Lorenz curve and a hypothetical line of absolute equality, expressed as a percentage of the maximum area under the line. Thus a Gini index of 0 represents perfect equality, while an index of 100 implies perfect inequality.
  • Gross National Income: GNI, Atlas method (current US$). GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and prop).
  • Household income or consumption by percentage share > Highest 10%: This entry is derived from Economy > Household income or consumption by percentage share, which data on household income or consumption come from household surveys, the results adjusted for household size. Nations use different standards and procedures in collecting and adjusting the data. Surveys based on income will normally show a more unequal distribution than surveys based on consumption. The quality of surveys is improving with time, yet caution is still necessary in making inter-country comparisons.
  • Human Development Index: The human development index values in this table were calculated using a consistent methodology and consistent data series. They are not strictly comparable with those in earlier Human Development Reports.
  • Imports > Commodities: This entry provides a listing of the highest-valued imported products; it sometimes includes the percent of total dollar value.
  • Public debt: This entry records the cumulatiive total of all government borrowings less repayments that are denominated in a country's home currency. Public debt should not be confused with external debt, which reflects the foreign currency liabilities of both the private and public sector and must be financed out of foreign exchange earnings.
  • Tourist arrivals: International inbound tourists (overnight visitors) are the number of tourists who travel to a country other than that in which they have their usual residence, but outside their usual environment, for a period not exceeding 12 months and whose main purpose in visiting is other than an activity remunerated from within the country visited. When data on number of tourists are not available, the number of visitors, which includes tourists, same-day visitors, cruise passengers, and crew members, is shown instead. Sources and collection methods for arrivals differ across countries. In some cases data are from border statistics (police, immigration, and the like) and supplemented by border surveys. In other cases data are from tourism accommodation establishments. For some countries number of arrivals is limited to arrivals by air and for others to arrivals staying in hotels. Some countries include arrivals of nationals residing abroad while others do not. Caution should thus be used in comparing arrivals across countries. The data on inbound tourists refer to the number of arrivals, not to the number of people traveling. Thus a person who makes several trips to a country during a given period is counted each time as a new arrival."
  • Fiscal year: The beginning and ending months for a country's accounting period of 12 months, which often is the calendar year but which may begin in any month. All yearly references are for the calendar year (CY) unless indicated as a noncalendar fiscal year (FY).
  • Exchange rates: The official value of a country's monetary unit at a given date or over a given period of time, as expressed in units of local currency per US dollar and as determined by international market forces or official fiat.
  • Exports > Commodities: This entry provides a listing of the highest-valued exported products; it sometimes includes the percent of total dollar value.
  • GDP > Composition by sector > Services: The gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final services produced within a nation in a given year. GDP dollar estimates in the Factbook are derived from purchasing power parity (PPP) calculations. See the CIA World Factbook for more information.
  • GDP > Per capita > PPP: This entry shows GDP on a purchasing power parity basis divided by population as of 1 July for the same year.
  • Current account balance: This entry records a country's net trade in goods and services, plus net earnings from rents, interest, profits, and dividends, and net transfer payments (such as pension funds and worker remittances) to and from the rest of the world during the period specified. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms.
  • Companies > Market capitalization of listed companies > % of GDP: Market capitalization of listed companies (% of GDP). Market capitalization (also known as market value) is the share price times the number of shares outstanding. Listed domestic companies are the domestically incorporated companies listed on the country's stock exchanges at the end of the year. Listed companies does not include investment companies, mutual funds, or other collective investment vehicles.
  • GDP > Composition, by sector of origin > Agriculture: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by sector of origin, which shows where production takes place in an economy. The distribution gives the percentage contribution of agriculture, industry, and services to total GDP, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete. Agriculture includes farming, fishing, and forestry. Industry includes mining, manufacturing, energy production, and construction. Services cover government activities, communications, transportation, finance, and all other private economic activities that do not produce material goods.
  • Stock of direct foreign investment > At home: This entry gives the cumulative US dollar value of all investments in the home country made directly by residents - primarily companies - of other countries as of the end of the time period indicated. Direct investment excludes investment through purchase of shares.
  • Imports: This entry provides the total US dollar amount of merchandise imports on a c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight) or f.o.b. (free on board) basis. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms.
  • Taxes and other revenues: This entry records total taxes and other revenues received by the national government during the time period indicated, expressed as a percent of GDP. Taxes include personal and corporate income taxes, value added taxes, excise taxes, and tariffs. Other revenues include social contributions - such as payments for social security and hospital insurance - grants, and net revenues from public enterprises. Normalizing the data, by dividing total revenues by GDP, enables easy comparisons across countries, and provides an average rate at which all income (GDP) is paid to the national level government for the supply of public goods and services.
  • Companies > Stock market > Stocks traded, total value > Current US$ per capita: Stocks traded, total value (current US$). Stocks traded refers to the total value of shares traded during the period. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • GDP > Purchasing power parity: This entry gives the gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. A nation's GDP at purchasing power parity (PPP) exchange rates is the sum value of all goods and services produced in the country valued at prices prevailing in the United States. This is the measure most economists prefer when looking at per-capita welfare and when comparing living conditions or use of resources across countries. The measure is difficult to compute, as a US dollar value has to be assigned to all goods and services in the country regardless of whether these goods and services have a direct equivalent in the United States (for example, the value of an ox-cart or non-US military equipment); as a result, PPP estimates for some countries are based on a small and sometimes different set of goods and services. In addition, many countries do not formally participate in the World Bank's PPP project that calculates these measures, so the resulting GDP estimates for these countries may lack precision. For many developing countries, PPP-based GDP measures are multiples of the official exchange rate (OER) measure. The difference between the OER- and PPP-denominated GDP values for most of the weathly industrialized countries are generally much smaller.
  • GDP > Composition, by end use > Investment in fixed capital: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by end use, which shows who does the spending in an economy: consumers, businesses, government, and foreigners. The distribution gives the percentage contribution to total GDP of household consumption, government consumption, investment in fixed capital, investment in inventories, exports of goods and services, and imports of goods and services, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete.
    household consumption consists of expenditures by resident households, and by nonprofit institutions that serve households, on goods and services that are consumed by individuals. This includes consumption of both domestically produced and foreign goods and services.
    government consumption consists of government expenditures on goods and services. These figures exclude government transfer payments, such as interest on debt, unemployment, and social security, since such payments are not made in exchange for goods and services supplied.
    investment in fixed capital consists of total business spending on fixed assets, such as factories, machinery, equipment, dwellings, and inventories of raw materials, which provide the basis for future production. It is measured gross of the depreciation of the assets, i.e., it includes investment that merely replaces worn-out or scrapped capital. Earlier editions of The World Factbook referred to this concept as Investment (gross fixed) and that data now have been moved to this new field.
    investment in inventories consists of net changes to the stock of outputs that are still held by the units that produce them, awaiting further sale to an end user, such as automobiles sitting on a dealer’s lot or groceries on the store shelves. This figure may be positive or negative. If the stock of unsold output increases during the relevant time period, investment in inventories is positive, but, if the stock of unsold goods declines, it will be negative. Investment in inventories normally is an early indicator of the state of the economy. If the stock of unsold items increases unexpectedly – because people stop buying - the economy may be entering a recession; but if the stock of unsold items falls - and goods "go flying off the shelves" - businesses normally try to replace those stocks, and the economy is likely to accelerate.
    exports of goods and services consist of sales, barter, gifts, or grants of goods and services from residents to nonresidents.
    imports of goods and ...
    Full definition
    .
  • Labor force > By occupation > Services: This entry is derived from Economy > Labor force > By occupation, which lists the percentage distribution of the labor force by sector of occupation. Agriculture includes farming, fishing, and forestry. Industry includes mining, manufacturing, energy production, and construction. Services cover government activities, communications, transportation, finance, and all other economic activities that do not produce material goods. The distribution will total less than 100 percent if the data are incomplete and may range from 99-101 percent due to rounding.
  • GDP > Composition, by sector of origin > Services: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by sector of origin, which shows where production takes place in an economy. The distribution gives the percentage contribution of agriculture, industry, and services to total GDP, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete. Agriculture includes farming, fishing, and forestry. Industry includes mining, manufacturing, energy production, and construction. Services cover government activities, communications, transportation, finance, and all other private economic activities that do not produce material goods.
  • GDP > Composition, by sector of origin > Industry: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by sector of origin, which shows where production takes place in an economy. The distribution gives the percentage contribution of agriculture, industry, and services to total GDP, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete. Agriculture includes farming, fishing, and forestry. Industry includes mining, manufacturing, energy production, and construction. Services cover government activities, communications, transportation, finance, and all other private economic activities that do not produce material goods.
  • Companies > Stock market > Stocks traded, turnover ratio > %: Stocks traded, turnover ratio (%). Turnover ratio is the total value of shares traded during the period divided by the average market capitalization for the period. Average market capitalization is calculated as the average of the end-of-period values for the current period and the previous period.
  • Budget > Revenues: Revenues calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms
  • Budget > Expenditures: Expenditures calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms
  • Labor force > By occupation > Industry: This entry is derived from Economy > Labor force > By occupation, which lists the percentage distribution of the labor force by sector of occupation. Agriculture includes farming, fishing, and forestry. Industry includes mining, manufacturing, energy production, and construction. Services cover government activities, communications, transportation, finance, and all other economic activities that do not produce material goods. The distribution will total less than 100 percent if the data are incomplete and may range from 99-101 percent due to rounding.
  • Overview: This entry briefly describes the type of economy, including the degree of market orientation, the level of economic development, the most important natural resources, and the unique areas of specialization. It also characterizes major economic events and policy changes in the most recent 12 months and may include a statement about one or two key future macroeconomic trends.
  • Labor force > By occupation > Agriculture: This entry is derived from Economy > Labor force > By occupation, which lists the percentage distribution of the labor force by sector of occupation. Agriculture includes farming, fishing, and forestry. Industry includes mining, manufacturing, energy production, and construction. Services cover government activities, communications, transportation, finance, and all other economic activities that do not produce material goods. The distribution will total less than 100 percent if the data are incomplete and may range from 99-101 percent due to rounding.
    Additional details:
    • Gibraltar: negligible (2013)
  • Companies > Stock market > Stocks traded, total value > Current US$: Stocks traded, total value (current US$). Stocks traded refers to the total value of shares traded during the period.
  • Companies > Market capitalization of listed companies > Current US$ per capita: Market capitalization of listed companies (current US$). Market capitalization (also known as market value) is the share price times the number of shares outstanding. Listed domestic companies are the domestically incorporated companies listed on the country's stock exchanges at the end of the year. Listed companies does not include investment companies, mutual funds, or other collective investment vehicles. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Reserves of foreign exchange and gold: This entry gives the dollar value for the stock of all financial assets that are available to the central monetary authority for use in meeting a country's balance of payments needs as of the end-date of the period specified. This category includes not only foreign currency and gold, but also a country's holdings of Special Drawing Rights in the International Monetary Fund, and its reserve position in the Fund.
  • GDP > Composition, by end use > Household consumption: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by end use, which shows who does the spending in an economy: consumers, businesses, government, and foreigners. The distribution gives the percentage contribution to total GDP of household consumption, government consumption, investment in fixed capital, investment in inventories, exports of goods and services, and imports of goods and services, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete.
    household consumption consists of expenditures by resident households, and by nonprofit institutions that serve households, on goods and services that are consumed by individuals. This includes consumption of both domestically produced and foreign goods and services.
    government consumption consists of government expenditures on goods and services. These figures exclude government transfer payments, such as interest on debt, unemployment, and social security, since such payments are not made in exchange for goods and services supplied.
    investment in fixed capital consists of total business spending on fixed assets, such as factories, machinery, equipment, dwellings, and inventories of raw materials, which provide the basis for future production. It is measured gross of the depreciation of the assets, i.e., it includes investment that merely replaces worn-out or scrapped capital. Earlier editions of The World Factbook referred to this concept as Investment (gross fixed) and that data now have been moved to this new field.
    investment in inventories consists of net changes to the stock of outputs that are still held by the units that produce them, awaiting further sale to an end user, such as automobiles sitting on a dealer’s lot or groceries on the store shelves. This figure may be positive or negative. If the stock of unsold output increases during the relevant time period, investment in inventories is positive, but, if the stock of unsold goods declines, it will be negative. Investment in inventories normally is an early indicator of the state of the economy. If the stock of unsold items increases unexpectedly – because people stop buying - the economy may be entering a recession; but if the stock of unsold items falls - and goods "go flying off the shelves" - businesses normally try to replace those stocks, and the economy is likely to accelerate.
    exports of goods and services consist of sales, barter, gifts, or grants of goods and services from residents to nonresidents.
    imports of goods and ...
    Full definition
    .
  • Budget surplus > + or deficit > -: This entry records the difference between national government revenues and expenditures, expressed as a percent of GDP. A positive (+) number indicates that revenues exceeded expenditures (a budget surplus), while a negative (-) number indicates the reverse (a budget deficit). Normalizing the data, by dividing the budget balance by GDP, enables easy comparisons across countries and indicates whether a national government saves or borrows money. Countries with high budget deficits (relative to their GDPs) generally have more difficulty raising funds to finance expenditures, than those with lower deficits.
  • GDP > Composition, by end use > Imports of goods and services: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by end use, which shows who does the spending in an economy: consumers, businesses, government, and foreigners. The distribution gives the percentage contribution to total GDP of household consumption, government consumption, investment in fixed capital, investment in inventories, exports of goods and services, and imports of goods and services, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete.
    household consumption consists of expenditures by resident households, and by nonprofit institutions that serve households, on goods and services that are consumed by individuals. This includes consumption of both domestically produced and foreign goods and services.
    government consumption consists of government expenditures on goods and services. These figures exclude government transfer payments, such as interest on debt, unemployment, and social security, since such payments are not made in exchange for goods and services supplied.
    investment in fixed capital consists of total business spending on fixed assets, such as factories, machinery, equipment, dwellings, and inventories of raw materials, which provide the basis for future production. It is measured gross of the depreciation of the assets, i.e., it includes investment that merely replaces worn-out or scrapped capital. Earlier editions of The World Factbook referred to this concept as Investment (gross fixed) and that data now have been moved to this new field.
    investment in inventories consists of net changes to the stock of outputs that are still held by the units that produce them, awaiting further sale to an end user, such as automobiles sitting on a dealer’s lot or groceries on the store shelves. This figure may be positive or negative. If the stock of unsold output increases during the relevant time period, investment in inventories is positive, but, if the stock of unsold goods declines, it will be negative. Investment in inventories normally is an early indicator of the state of the economy. If the stock of unsold items increases unexpectedly – because people stop buying - the economy may be entering a recession; but if the stock of unsold items falls - and goods "go flying off the shelves" - businesses normally try to replace those stocks, and the economy is likely to accelerate.
    exports of goods and services consist of sales, barter, gifts, or grants of goods and services from residents to nonresidents.
    imports of goods and ...
    Full definition
  • Exports > Partners: This entry provides a rank ordering of trading partners starting with the most important; it sometimes includes the percent of total dollar value.
  • Companies > Market capitalization of listed companies > Current US$, % of GDP: Market capitalization of listed companies (current US$). Market capitalization (also known as market value) is the share price times the number of shares outstanding. Listed domestic companies are the domestically incorporated companies listed on the country's stock exchanges at the end of the year. Listed companies does not include investment companies, mutual funds, or other collective investment vehicles. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Figures expressed as a proportion of GDP for the same year
  • Industrial production growth rate: This entry gives the annual percentage increase in industrial production (includes manufacturing, mining, and construction).
  • Industries: A rank ordering of industries starting with the largest by value of annual output.
  • Imports > Partners: This entry provides a rank ordering of trading partners starting with the most important; it sometimes includes the percent of total dollar value.
  • Household income or consumption by percentage share > Lowest 10%: This entry is derived from Economy > Household income or consumption by percentage share, which data on household income or consumption come from household surveys, the results adjusted for household size. Nations use different standards and procedures in collecting and adjusting the data. Surveys based on income will normally show a more unequal distribution than surveys based on consumption. The quality of surveys is improving with time, yet caution is still necessary in making inter-country comparisons.
  • Companies > Listed domestic companies, total: Listed domestic companies, total. Listed domestic companies are the domestically incorporated companies listed on the country's stock exchanges at the end of the year. This indicator does not include investment companies, mutual funds, or other collective investment vehicles.
  • Labor force: This entry contains the total labor force figure.
  • GDP > Composition by sector > Agriculture: The gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods produced by the agricultural sector within a nation in a given year. GDP dollar estimates in the Factbook are derived from purchasing power parity (PPP) calculations. See the CIA World Factbook for more information.
  • Companies > Stock market > Stocks traded, total value > Current US$, % of GDP: Stocks traded, total value (current US$). Stocks traded refers to the total value of shares traded during the period. Figures expressed as a proportion of GDP for the same year
  • GDP > Official exchange rate: This entry gives the gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. A nation's GDP at offical exchange rates (OER) is the home-currency-denominated annual GDP figure divided by the bilateral average US exchange rate with that country in that year. The measure is simple to compute and gives a precise measure of the value of output. Many economists prefer this measure when gauging the economic power an economy maintains vis-a-vis its neighbors, judging that an exchange rate captures the purchasing power a nation enjoys in the international marketplace. Official exchange rates, however, can be artifically fixed and/or subject to manipulation - resulting in claims of the country having an under- or over-valued currency - and are not necessarily the equivalent of a market-determined exchange rate. Moreover, even if the official exchange rate is market-determined, market exchange rates are frequently established by a relatively small set of goods and services (the ones the country trades) and may not capture the value of the larger set of goods the country produces. Furthermore, OER-converted GDP is not well suited to comparing domestic GDP over time, since appreciation/depreciation from one year to the next will make the OER GDP value rise/fall regardless of whether home-currency-denominated GDP changed.
  • Inflation rate > Consumer prices: This entry furnishes the annual percent change in consumer prices compared with the previous year's consumer prices.
  • Companies > Stock market > Stocks traded, total value > % of GDP: Stocks traded, total value (% of GDP). Stocks traded refers to the total value of shares traded during the period. This indicator complements the market capitalization ratio by showing whether market size is matched by trading.
  • GDP > Composition, by end use > Government consumption: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by end use, which shows who does the spending in an economy: consumers, businesses, government, and foreigners. The distribution gives the percentage contribution to total GDP of household consumption, government consumption, investment in fixed capital, investment in inventories, exports of goods and services, and imports of goods and services, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete.
    household consumption consists of expenditures by resident households, and by nonprofit institutions that serve households, on goods and services that are consumed by individuals. This includes consumption of both domestically produced and foreign goods and services.
    government consumption consists of government expenditures on goods and services. These figures exclude government transfer payments, such as interest on debt, unemployment, and social security, since such payments are not made in exchange for goods and services supplied.
    investment in fixed capital consists of total business spending on fixed assets, such as factories, machinery, equipment, dwellings, and inventories of raw materials, which provide the basis for future production. It is measured gross of the depreciation of the assets, i.e., it includes investment that merely replaces worn-out or scrapped capital. Earlier editions of The World Factbook referred to this concept as Investment (gross fixed) and that data now have been moved to this new field.
    investment in inventories consists of net changes to the stock of outputs that are still held by the units that produce them, awaiting further sale to an end user, such as automobiles sitting on a dealer’s lot or groceries on the store shelves. This figure may be positive or negative. If the stock of unsold output increases during the relevant time period, investment in inventories is positive, but, if the stock of unsold goods declines, it will be negative. Investment in inventories normally is an early indicator of the state of the economy. If the stock of unsold items increases unexpectedly – because people stop buying - the economy may be entering a recession; but if the stock of unsold items falls - and goods "go flying off the shelves" - businesses normally try to replace those stocks, and the economy is likely to accelerate.
    exports of goods and services consist of sales, barter, gifts, or grants of goods and services from residents to nonresidents.
    imports of goods and ...
    Full definition
  • Exports: This entry provides the total US dollar amount of merchandise exports on an f.o.b. (free on board) basis. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms.
  • Unemployment rate: This entry contains the percent of the labor force that is without jobs. Substantial underemployment might be noted.
  • GDP > Composition by sector > Industry: The gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods produced by the industrial sector within a nation in a given year. GDP dollar estimates in the Factbook are derived from purchasing power parity (PPP) calculations. See the CIA World Factbook for more information.
  • Companies > Market capitalization of listed companies > Current US$: Market capitalization of listed companies (current US$). Market capitalization (also known as market value) is the share price times the number of shares outstanding. Listed domestic companies are the domestically incorporated companies listed on the country's stock exchanges at the end of the year. Listed companies does not include investment companies, mutual funds, or other collective investment vehicles. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Technology index: The technology index denotes the country's technological readiness. This index is created with such indicators as companies spending on R&D, the creativity of its scientific community, personal computer and internet penetration rates.
  • GDP > PPP: Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) in Millions of International Dollars, 2004.
  • Consumer price index: Consumer price index reflects changes in the cost to the average consumer of acquiring a fixed basket of goods and services that may be fixed or changed at specified intervals, such as yearly. The Laspeyres formula is generally used.
    2000 = 100
  • Budget > Revenues per capita: Revenues calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Consumer spending: Household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption) is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country. This item also includes any statistical discrepancy in the use of resources relative to the supply of resources."
  • Economic freedom: Index of 'economic freedom', according to the American organisation 'The Heritage Foundation'. It is worth noting that such indices are based on highly culturally contingent factors. This data makes a number of assumptions about 'freedom' and the role of the government that are not accepted by much of the world's population. A broad discussion of The Heritage Foundation's definition and methodology can be found at http://www.heritage.org/research/features/index/ChapterPDFs/chapter5.HTML.
  • Economic aid > Donor: The net official development assistance (ODA) from Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) nations to developing countries and multilateral organizations. ODA is defined as financial assistance that is concessional in character, has the main objective to promote economic development and welfare of the less developed countries (LDCs), and contains a grant element of at least 25%. The entry does not cover other official flows (OOF) or private flows.
  • Industrial > Production growth rate: The annual percentage increase in industrial production (includes manufacturing, mining, and construction).
  • Real interest rate: Real interest rate is the lending interest rate adjusted for inflation as measured by the GDP deflator.
  • Outbound tourist spending: International tourism expenditures are expenditures of international outbound visitors in other countries, including payments to foreign carriers for international transport. These expenditures may include those by residents traveling abroad as same-day visitors, except in cases where these are important enough to justify separate classification. For some countries they do not include expenditures for passenger transport items. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • Business efficiency: Based upon a business efficiency index where '100' represents the highest level of business efficiency.
  • GDP per person: GDP per capita is gross domestic product divided by midyear population. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Inflation: Consumer price index reflects changes in the cost to the average consumer of acquiring a basket of goods and services that may be fixed or changed at specified intervals, such as yearly. The Laspeyres formula is generally used."
  • Deposit interest rate: Deposit interest rate is the rate paid by commercial or similar banks for demand, time, or savings deposits.
  • Overall productivity > PPP: Estimates: GDP (PPP) per person employed, US$
  • GDP deflator: The GDP implicit deflator is the ratio of GDP in current local currency to GDP in constant local currency. The base year varies by country.
  • Patents granted: Patents granted to residents per million people 1998.
  • Budget > Expenditures per capita: Expenditures calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Trade balance with US: In US dollars. Jan 2003 - March 2003
  • Macroeconomic environment index: The macroeconomic environment index indicates the quality of the macroeconomic environment of a country.
  • Growth competitiveness score: The GCI, or the Growth competitiveness index, is composed of three pillars, all of which are widely accepted as being critical to economic growth: the quality of the macroeconomic environment, the state of a country's public institutions, and, given the increasing importance of technology in the development process, a country's technological readiness. The GCI aims specifically to gauge the ability of the world's economies to achieve sustained economic growth over the medium to long term.
  • Public institution index: Public institution index indicates the state of the country's public institutions.
  • GDP in 1970: Gross domestic product GDP by exchange rate billion US dollar in 1970.
  • GDP > Current LCU: GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current local currency.
  • New business creation rate: Business entry rate shows the number of new firms, defined as firms registered in the current year of reporting, expressed as a percentage of total registered firms. Data are collected on firm entry and exit and total firms. Because of underreporting of firms that have closed or exited, especially in developing countries, the data on total registered firms may be biased upward."
  • Saving rate: ""Saving rate"" or gross savings are calculated as gross national income less total consumption, plus net transfers."
  • New businesses registered > Number: New businesses registered are the number of new firms, defined as firms registered in the current year of reporting."
  • Steel > Production: Production of crude steel in million tonnes.
  • Household spending per capita: Household final consumption expenditure per capita (private consumption per capita) is calculated using private consumption in constant 2000 prices and World Bank population estimates. Household final consumption expenditure is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country. Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars."
  • Government spending: General government final consumption expenditure (formerly general government consumption) includes all government current expenditures for purchases of goods and services (including compensation of employees). It also includes most expenditures on national defense and security, but excludes government military expenditures that are part of government capital formation. Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars."
  • Economic growth > Per capita: Annual percentage growth rate of GDP per capita based on constant local currency. GDP per capita is gross domestic product divided by midyear population. GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources.
  • World trade > Exports: Exports of goods and services represent the value of all goods and other market services provided to the rest of the world. They include the value of merchandise, freight, insurance, transport, travel, royalties, license fees, and other services, such as communication, construction, financial, information, business, personal, and government services. They exclude compensation of employees and investment income (formerly called factor services) and transfer payments. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • Budget > Expenditures > Capital: This entry includes revenues, expenditures, and capital expenditures. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms.
  • Inequality > GINI index: Gini index measures the extent to which the distribution of income (or, in some cases, consumption expenditure) among individuals or households within an economy deviates from a perfectly equal distribution. A Lorenz curve plots the cumulative percentages of total income received against the cumulative number of recipients, starting with the poorest individual or household. The Gini index measures the area between the Lorenz curve and a hypothetical line of absolute equality, expressed as a percentage of the maximum area under the line. Thus a Gini index of 0 represents perfect equality, while an index of 100 implies perfect inequality."
  • Currency: The national medium of exchange and its basic sub-unit.
  • Gross domestic savings: Gross domestic savings are calculated as GDP less final consumption expenditure (total consumption). Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Lending interest rate: Lending interest rate is the rate charged by banks on loans to prime customers.
  • Investment > Gross fixed: This entry records total business spending on fixed assets, such as factories, machinery, equipment, dwellings, and inventories of raw materials, which provide the basis for future production. It is measured gross of the depreciation of the assets, i.e., it includes invesment that merely replaces worn-out or scrapped capital.
  • Exchange rates > Recent years: The official value of a country's monetary unit at a given date or over a given period of time, as expressed in units of local currency per US dollar and as determined by international market forces or official fiat."
  • Household spending: Household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption) is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country. Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars."
  • GDP after tax: Gross value added at factor cost (formerly GDP at factor cost) is derived as the sum of the value added in the agriculture, industry and services sectors. If the value added of these sectors is calculated at purchaser values, gross value added at factor cost is derived by subtracting net product taxes from GDP. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • World Bank exchange rate: The DEC alternative conversion factor is the underlying annual exchange rate used for the World Bank Atlas method. As a rule, it is the official exchange rate reported in the IMF's International Financial Statistics (line rf). Exceptions arise where further refinements are made by World Bank staff. It is expressed in local currency units per U.S. dollar."
  • Listed domestic companies: Listed domestic companies are the domestically incorporated companies listed on the country's stock exchanges at the end of the year. This indicator does not include investment companies, mutual funds, or other collective investment vehicles.
  • Stocks traded > Turnover ratio: Turnover ratio is the total value of shares traded during the period divided by the average market capitalization for the period. Average market capitalization is calculated as the average of the end-of-period values for the current period and the previous period.
  • Government expenditure: General government final consumption expenditure (formerly general government consumption) includes all government current expenditures for purchases of goods and services (including compensation of employees). It also includes most expenditures on national defense and security, but excludes government military expenditures that are part of government capital formation. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • Tourist departures: International outbound tourists are the number of departures that people make from their country of usual residence to any other country for any purpose other than a remunerated activity in the country visited. The data on outbound tourists refer to the number of departures, not to the number of people traveling. Thus a person who makes several trips from a country during a given period is counted each time as a new departure."
  • GDP > Constant LCU: GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant local currency.
  • Male to female earnings: Difference between male and female median full-time earnings as % of male median full-time earnings (1999)
  • GNI: GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Currency code: The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 4217 alphabetic currency code for each country.
  • Patent applications > Nonresidents: Patent applications are worldwide patent applications filed through the Patent Cooperation Treaty procedure or with a national patent office for exclusive rights for an invention--a product or process that provides a new way of doing something or offers a new technical solution to a problem. A patent provides protection for the invention to the owner of the patent for a limited period, generally 20 years."
  • Ease of doing business: Ease of doing business index ranks economies from 1 to 183, with first place being the best. A high ranking means that the regulatory environment is conducive to business operation. The index ranks the simple average of the country's percentile rankings on 10 topics covered in the World Bank's Doing Business. The ranking on each topic is the simple average of the percentile rankings on its component indicators. 1=most business-friendly regulations"
  • Patent applications > Residents: Patent applications are worldwide patent applications filed through the Patent Cooperation Treaty procedure or with a national patent office for exclusive rights for an invention--a product or process that provides a new way of doing something or offers a new technical solution to a problem. A patent provides protection for the invention to the owner of the patent for a limited period, generally 20 years."
  • Policy competitiveness: Extent to which government policies are conducive to competitiveness (2003)
  • Net taxes: Net taxes on products (net indirect taxes) are the sum of product taxes less subsidies. Product taxes are those taxes payable by producers that relate to the production, sale, purchase or use of the goods and services. Subsidies are grants on the current account made by general government to private enterprises and unincorporated public enterprises. The grants may take the form of payments to ensure a guaranteed price or to enable maintenance of prices of goods and services below costs of production, and other forms of assistance to producers. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • Gross savings: Gross savings are calculated as gross national income less total consumption, plus net transfers. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • GNI > Current LCU: GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current local currency.
  • Services output: Services correspond to ISIC divisions 50-99. They include value added in wholesale and retail trade (including hotels and restaurants), transport, and government, financial, professional, and personal services such as education, health care, and real estate services. Also included are imputed bank service charges, import duties, and any statistical discrepancies noted by national compilers as well as discrepancies arising from rescaling. Value added is the net output of a sector after adding up all outputs and subtracting intermediate inputs. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or depletion and degradation of natural resources. The industrial origin of value added is determined by the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 3. Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars."
  • Services growth: Annual growth rate for value added in services based on constant local currency. Aggregates are based on constant 2000 U.S. dollars. Services correspond to ISIC divisions 50-99. They include value added in wholesale and retail trade (including hotels and restaurants), transport, and government, financial, professional, and personal services such as education, health care, and real estate services. Also included are imputed bank service charges, import duties, and any statistical discrepancies noted by national compilers as well as discrepancies arising from rescaling. Value added is the net output of a sector after adding up all outputs and subtracting intermediate inputs. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or depletion and degradation of natural resources. The industrial origin of value added is determined by the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 3."
  • Total businesses registered > Number: Total businesses registered. Because of underreporting of firms that have closed or exited, especially in developing countries, the data on total registered firms may be biased upward."
  • Development assistance to LDCs: Official Development Assistance (ODA) to Least Developed Countries (LDC's) as a proportion of all development assistance. (2000)
  • Interest payments > Current LCU: Interest payments include interest payments on government debt--including long-term bonds, long-term loans, and other debt instruments--to domestic and foreign residents.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of meat > Poultry > Etc per 1000: US exports of meat, poultry, etc., USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Trade > Imports > Goods and services > Current US$: Imports of goods and services represent the value of all goods and other market services received from the rest of the world. They include the value of merchandise, freight, insurance, transport, travel, royalties, license fees, and other services, such as communication, construction, financial, information, business, personal, and government services. They exclude labor and property income (formerly called factor services) as well as transfer payments. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of measuring > Testing > Control instruments per 1000: US exports of measuring, testing, control instruments, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Gross domestic savings > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Gross domestic savings are calculated as GDP less final consumption expenditure (total consumption). Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • Cash surplus/deficit > % of GDP: Cash surplus or deficit is revenue (including grants) minus expense, minus net acquisition of nonfinancial assets. In the 1986 GFS manual nonfinancial assets were included under revenue and expenditure in gross terms. This cash surplus or deficit is closest to the earlier overall budget balance (still missing is lending minus repayments, which are now a financing item under net acquisition of financial assets).
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of materials handling equipment per 1000: US exports of materials handling equipment, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Expense > % of GDP: Expense is cash payments for operating activities of the government in providing goods and services. It includes compensation of employees (such as wages and salaries), interest and subsidies, grants, social benefits, and other expenses such as rent and dividends.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of marine engines > Parts per million: US exports of marine engines, parts, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Stocks traded > Total value > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Stocks traded refers to the total value of shares traded during the period. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • Tax > Taxes on income > Profits and capital gains > % of revenue: Taxes on income, profits, and capital gains are levied on the actual or presumptive net income of individuals, on the profits of corporations and enterprises, and on capital gains, whether realized or not, on land, securities, and other assets. Intragovernmental payments are eliminated in consolidation.
  • Inflation > GDP deflator > Annual %: Inflation as measured by the annual growth rate of the GDP implicit deflator shows the rate of price change in the economy as a whole. The GDP implicit deflator is the ratio of GDP in current local currency to GDP in constant local currency.
  • Services > Etc. > Value added > Annual % growth: Annual growth rate for value added in services based on constant local currency. Aggregates are based on constant 2000 U.S. dollars. Services correspond to ISIC divisions 50-99. They include value added in wholesale and retail trade (including hotels and restaurants), transport, and government, financial, professional, and personal services such as education, health care, and real estate services. Also included are imputed bank service charges, import duties, and any statistical discrepancies noted by national compilers as well as discrepancies arising from rescaling. Value added is the net output of a sector after adding up all outputs and subtracting intermediate inputs. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or depletion and degradation of natural resources. The industrial origin of value added is determined by the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 3.
  • Net income from abroad > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Net income includes the net labor income and net property and entrepreneurial income components of the SNA. Labor income covers compensation of employees paid to nonresident workers. Property and entrepreneurial income covers investment income from the ownership of foreign financial claims (interest, dividends, rent, etc.) and nonfinancial property income (patents, copyrights, etc.). Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • Portfolio investment > Excluding LCFAR > BoP > Current US$: Portfolio investment excluding liabilities constituting foreign authorities' reserves covers transactions in equity securities and debt securities. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Gross capital formation > Current US$: Gross capital formation (formerly gross domestic investment) consists of outlays on additions to the fixed assets of the economy plus net changes in the level of inventories. Fixed assets include land improvements (fences, ditches, drains, and so on); plant, machinery, and equipment purchases; and the construction of roads, railways, and the like, including schools, offices, hospitals, private residential dwellings, and commercial and industrial buildings. Inventories are stocks of goods held by firms to meet temporary or unexpected fluctuations in production or sales, and "work in progress." According to the 1993 SNA, net acquisitions of valuables are also considered capital formation. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of glass-plate > Sheet > Etc per million: US exports of glass-plate, sheet, etc., USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Changes in net > Reserves > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Changes in net reserves is the net change in a country's holdings of international reserves resulting from transactions on the current, capital, and financial accounts. These include changes in holdings of monetary gold, SDRs, foreign exchange assets, reserve position in the International Monetary Fund, and other claims on nonresidents that are available to the central authority. The measure is net of liabilities constituting foreign authorities' reserves, and counterpart items for valuation changes and exceptional financing items. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • Gross value added at factor cost > Constant 2000 US$: Gross value added at factor cost (formerly GDP at factor cost) is derived as the sum of the value added in the agriculture, industry and services sectors. If the value added of these sectors is calculated at purchaser values, gross value added at factor cost is derived by subtracting net product taxes from GDP. Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of rugs per million: US exports of rugs, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • GNI > Atlas method > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current U.S. dollars. GNI, calculated in national currency, is usually converted to U.S. dollars at official exchange rates for comparisons across economies, although an alternative rate is used when the official exchange rate is judged to diverge by an exceptionally large margin from the rate actually applied in international transactions. To smooth fluctuations in prices and exchange rates, a special Atlas method of conversion is used by the World Bank. This applies a conversion factor that averages the exchange rate for a given year and the two preceding years, adjusted for differences in rates of inflation between the country, and through 2000, the G-5 countries (France, Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States). From 2001, these countries include the Euro Zone, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 $ gross domestic product.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of logs and lumber per 1000: US exports of logs and lumber, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • GNI > Atlas method > Current US$: GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current U.S. dollars. GNI, calculated in national currency, is usually converted to U.S. dollars at official exchange rates for comparisons across economies, although an alternative rate is used when the official exchange rate is judged to diverge by an exceptionally large margin from the rate actually applied in international transactions. To smooth fluctuations in prices and exchange rates, a special Atlas method of conversion is used by the World Bank. This applies a conversion factor that averages the exchange rate for a given year and the two preceding years, adjusted for differences in rates of inflation between the country, and through 2000, the G-5 countries (France, Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States). From 2001, these countries include the Euro Zone, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States.
  • Trade > Exports > Goods and services > Current US$: Exports of goods and services represent the value of all goods and other market services provided to the rest of the world. They include the value of merchandise, freight, insurance, transport, travel, royalties, license fees, and other services, such as communication, construction, financial, information, business, personal, and government services. They exclude labor and property income (formerly called factor services) as well as transfer payments. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Gross capital formation > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Gross capital formation (formerly gross domestic investment) consists of outlays on additions to the fixed assets of the economy plus net changes in the level of inventories. Fixed assets include land improvements (fences, ditches, drains, and so on); plant, machinery, and equipment purchases; and the construction of roads, railways, and the like, including schools, offices, hospitals, private residential dwellings, and commercial and industrial buildings. Inventories are stocks of goods held by firms to meet temporary or unexpected fluctuations in production or sales, and "work in progress." According to the 1993 SNA, net acquisitions of valuables are also considered capital formation. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 $ gross domestic product.
  • Gross national expenditure > Current US$: Gross national expenditure (formerly domestic absorption) is the sum of household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption), general government final consumption expenditure (formerly general government consumption), and gross capital formation (formerly gross domestic investment). Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Income payments > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Income payments refer to employee compensation paid to nonresident workers and investment income (payments on direct investment, portfolio investment, other investments). Income derived from the use of intangible assets is excluded from income and recorded under business services. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • Interest payments > % of expense: Interest payments include interest payments on government debt--including long-term bonds, long-term loans, and other debt instruments--to domestic and foreign residents.
  • Net errors and omissions > Adjusted > BoP > Current US$: Net errors and omissions constitute a residual category needed to ensure that all debit and credit entries in the balance of payments statement sum to zero. In the International Financial Statistics presentation, this is equal to the difference between reserves and related items and the sum of the balances of the current, capital, and financial accounts. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Revenue > Excluding grants > % of GDP: Revenue is cash receipts from taxes, social contributions, and other revenues such as fines, fees, rent, and income from property or sales. Grants are also considered as revenue but are excluded here.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of semiconductors per 1000: US exports of semiconductors, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of shingles > Molding > Wallboard per 1000: US exports of shingles, molding, wallboard, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Service > Exports > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita: Services (previously nonfactor services) refer to economic output of intangible commodities that may be produced, transferred, and consumed at the same time. International transactions in services are defined by the IMF's Balance of Payments Manual (1993), but definitions may nevertheless vary among reporting economies. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of spacecraft > Excluding military per million: US exports of spacecraft, excluding military, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Subsidies and other transfers > % of expense: Subsidies, grants, and other social benefits include all unrequited, nonrepayable transfers on current account to private and public enterprises; grants to foreign governments, international organizations, and other government units; and social security, social assistance benefits, and employer social benefits in cash and in kind.
  • Trade > Exports > Goods and services > Annual % growth: Annual growth rate of exports of goods and services based on constant local currency. Aggregates are based on constant 2000 U.S. dollars. Exports of goods and services represent the value of all goods and other market services provided to the rest of the world. They include the value of merchandise, freight, insurance, transport, travel, royalties, license fees, and other services, such as communication, construction, financial, information, business, personal, and government services. They exclude labor and property income (formerly called factor services) as well as transfer payments.
  • Trade > Exports > Goods and services > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Exports of goods and services comprise all transactions between residents of a country and the rest of the world involving a change of ownership from residents to nonresidents of general merchandise, goods sent for processing and repairs, nonmonetary gold, and services. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 $ gross domestic product.
  • External balance on goods and services > Current US$: External balance on goods and services (formerly resource balance) equals exports of goods and services minus imports of goods and services (previously nonfactor services). Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Final > Consumption expenditure > Etc. > % of GDP: Final consumption expenditure (formerly total consumption) is the sum of household final consumption expenditure (private consumption) and general government final consumption expenditure (general government consumption). This estimate includes any statistical discrepancy in the use of resources relative to the supply of resources.
  • Final > Consumption expenditure > Etc. > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Final consumption expenditure (formerly total consumption) is the sum of household final consumption expenditure (private consumption) and general government final consumption expenditure (general government consumption). This estimate includes any statistical discrepancy in the use of resources relative to the supply of resources. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 $ gross domestic product.
  • GDP > PPP > Current international $: PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current international dollars.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of sports apparel and gear per million: US exports of sports apparel and gear, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of steelmaking materials per 1000: US exports of steelmaking materials, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Household final > Consumption expenditure > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption) is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 $ gross domestic product.
  • Income share held by lowest 20%: Percentage share of income or consumption is the share that accrues to subgroups of population indicated by deciles or quintiles. Percentage shares by quintile may not sum to 100 because of rounding.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of manmade cloth per 1000: US exports of manmade cloth, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of hides and skins per million: US exports of hides and skins, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of finished metal shapes per 1000: US exports of finished metal shapes, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Foreign direct investment > Net > BoP > Current US$: Foreign direct investment is net inflows of investment to acquire a lasting management interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than that of the investor. It is the sum of equity capital, reinvestment of earnings, other long-term capital, and short-term capital as shown in the balance of payments. This series shows total net, that is, net FDI in the reporting economy from foreign sources less net FDI by the reporting economy to the rest of the world. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Currency > Real effective exchange rate index: Real effective exchange rate is the nominal effective exchange rate (a measure of the value of a currency against a weighted average of several foreign currencies) divided by a price deflator or index of costs.
    2000 = 100
  • External balance on goods and services > % of GDP: External balance on goods and services (formerly resource balance) equals exports of goods and services minus imports of goods and services (previously nonfactor services).
  • Foreign direct investment > Net > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Foreign direct investment is net inflows of investment to acquire a lasting management interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than that of the investor. It is the sum of equity capital, reinvestment of earnings, other long-term capital, and short-term capital as shown in the balance of payments. This series shows total net, that is, net FDI in the reporting economy from foreign sources less net FDI by the reporting economy to the rest of the world. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • Domestic credit provided by banking sector > % of GDP: Domestic credit provided by the banking sector includes all credit to various sectors on a gross basis, with the exception of credit to the central government, which is net. The banking sector includes monetary authorities and deposit money banks, as well as other banking institutions where data are available (including institutions that do not accept transferable deposits but do incur such liabilities as time and savings deposits). Examples of other banking institutions are savings and mortgage loan institutions and building and loan associations.
  • Royalty and license fees > Payments > BoP > Current US$: Royalty and license fees are payments and receipts between residents and nonresidents for the authorized use of intangible, nonproduced, nonfinancial assets and proprietary rights (such as patents, copyrights, trademarks, industrial processes, and franchises) and for the use, through licensing agreements, of produced originals of prototypes (such as films and manuscripts). Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of generators > Accessories per 1000: US exports of generators, accessories, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Commercial service imports > Current US$: Commercial service imports are total service imports minus imports of government services not included elsewhere. International transactions in services are defined by the IMF's Balance of Payments Manual (1993) as the economic output of intangible commodities that may be produced, transferred, and consumed at the same time. Definitions may vary among reporting economies.
  • Trade > Imports of goods > Services and income > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Imports of goods, services and income is the sum of goods (merchandise) imports, imports of (nonfactor) services and income (factor) payments. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 $ gross domestic product.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of railway transportation equipment per million: US exports of railway transportation equipment, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of pleasure boats and motors per 1000: US exports of pleasure boats and motors, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Service imports > BoP > Current US$: Services (previously nonfactor services) refer to economic output of intangible commodities that may be produced, transferred, and consumed at the same time. International transactions in services are defined by the IMF's Balance of Payments Manual (1993), but definitions may nevertheless vary among reporting economies. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Trade > Imports > Goods and services > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Imports of goods and services comprise all transactions between residents of a country and the rest of the world involving a change of ownership from nonresidents to residents of general merchandise, goods sent for processing and repairs, nonmonetary gold, and services. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 $ gross domestic product.
  • Royalty and license fees > Receipts > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Royalty and license fees are payments and receipts between residents and nonresidents for the authorized use of intangible, nonproduced, nonfinancial assets and proprietary rights (such as patents, copyrights, trademarks, industrial processes, and franchises) and for the use, through licensing agreements, of produced originals of prototypes (such as films and manuscripts). Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 million $ gross domestic product.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of fruits > Frozen juices per 1000: US exports of fruits, frozen juices, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of precious metals > Other per million: US exports of precious metals, other, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Final > Consumption expenditure > Etc. > Current US$: Final consumption expenditure (formerly total consumption) is the sum of household final consumption expenditure (private consumption) and general government final consumption expenditure (general government consumption). This estimate includes any statistical discrepancy in the use of resources relative to the supply of resources. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of plastic materials per 1000: US exports of plastic materials, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • GDP > PPP > Constant 2000 international $: PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant 2000 international dollars.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of excavating machinery per 1000: US exports of excavating machinery, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Net capital account > BoP > Current US$: Net capital account includes government debt forgiveness, investment grants in cash or in kind by a government entity, and taxes on capital transfers. Also included are migrants' capital transfers and debt forgiveness and investment grants by nongovernmental entities. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Final > Consumption expenditure > Constant 2000 US$: Final consumption expenditure (formerly total consumption) is the sum of household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption) and general government final consumption expenditure (formerly general government consumption). Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars.
  • Current account balance > % of GDP: Current account balance is the sum of net exports of goods, services, net income, and net current transfers.
  • Micro > Small and medium enterprises > Number: Micro, small, and medium-size enterprises are business that may be defined by the number of employees. There is no international standard definition of firm size; however, many institutions that collect information use the following size categories: micro enterprises have 0-9 employees, small enterprises have 10-49 employees, and medium-size enterprises have 50-249 employees.
  • Household final > Consumption expenditure > Etc. > Current US$: Household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption) is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country. This item also includes any statistical discrepancy in the use of resources relative to the supply of resources. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Gross value added at factor cost > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Gross value added at factor cost (formerly GDP at factor cost) is derived as the sum of the value added in the agriculture, industry and services sectors. If the value added of these sectors is calculated at purchaser values, gross value added at factor cost is derived by subtracting net product taxes from GDP. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 $ gross domestic product.
  • Gross private capital flows > % of GDP: Gross private capital flows are the sum of the absolute values of direct, portfolio, and other investment inflows and outflows recorded in the balance of payments financial account, excluding changes in the assets and liabilities of monetary authorities and general government. The indicator is calculated as a ratio to GDP in U.S. dollars.
  • Micro > Small and medium enterprises > Per 1,000 people: Micro, small, and medium-size enterprises are business that may be defined by the number of employees. There is no international standard definition of firm size; however, many institutions that collect information use the following size categories: micro enterprises have 0-9 employees, small enterprises have 10-49 employees, and medium-size enterprises have 50-249 employees.
  • Central government debt > Total > % of GDP: Debt is the entire stock of direct government fixed-term contractual obligations to others outstanding on a particular date. It includes domestic and foreign liabilities such as currency and money deposits, securities other than shares, and loans. It is the gross amount of government liabilities reduced by the amount of equity and financial derivatives held by the government. Because debt is a stock rather than a flow, it is measured as of a given date, usually the last day of the fiscal year.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of photo > Service industry machinery per 1000: US exports of photo, service industry machinery, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Goods > Exports > BoP > Current US$: Goods exports refer to all movable goods (including nonmonetary gold) involved in a change of ownership from residents to nonresidents. The category includes goods previously included in services: goods received or sent for processing and their subsequent export or import in the form of processed goods, repairs on goods, and goods procured in ports by carriers. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Household final > Consumption expenditure > Annual % growth: Annual percentage growth of household final consumption expenditure based on constant local currency. Aggregates are based on constant 2000 U.S. dollars. Household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption) is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country.
  • GNI > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 $ gross domestic product.
  • Gross fixed capital formation > Annual % growth: Average annual growth of gross fixed capital formation based on constant local currency. Aggregates are based on constant 2000 U.S. dollars. Gross fixed capital formation (formerly gross domestic fixed investment) includes land improvements (fences, ditches, drains, and so on); plant, machinery, and equipment purchases; and the construction of roads, railways, and the like, including schools, offices, hospitals, private residential dwellings, and commercial and industrial buildings. According to the 1993 SNA, net acquisitions of valuables are also considered capital formation.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of fuel oil per 1000: US exports of fuel oil, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Foreign direct investment > Net inflows > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Foreign direct investment are the net inflows of investment to acquire a lasting management interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than that of the investor. It is the sum of equity capital, reinvestment of earnings, other long-term capital, and short-term capital as shown in the balance of payments. This series shows net inflows in the reporting economy. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 million $ gross domestic product.
  • Foreign direct investment > Net inflows > % of GDP: Foreign direct investment are the net inflows of investment to acquire a lasting management interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than that of the investor. It is the sum of equity capital, reinvestment of earnings, other long-term capital, and short-term capital as shown in the balance of payments. This series shows net inflows in the reporting economy and is divided by GDP.
  • Current account balance > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Current account balance is the sum of net exports of goods, services, net income, and net current transfers. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • Commercial service > Exports > Current US$: Commercial service exports are total service exports minus exports of government services not included elsewhere. International transactions in services are defined by the IMF's Balance of Payments Manual (1993) as the economic output of intangible commodities that may be produced, transferred, and consumed at the same time. Definitions may vary among reporting economies.
  • Current account balance > BoP > Current US$: Current account balance is the sum of net exports of goods, services, net income, and net current transfers. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of food > Tobacco machinery per 1000: US exports of food, tobacco machinery, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Bank liquid > Reserves to bank assets ratio: Ratio of bank liquid reserves to bank assets is the ratio of domestic currency holdings and deposits with the monetary authorities to claims on other governments, nonfinancial public enterprises, the private sector, and other banking institutions.
  • Trade > Imports of goods > Services and income > BoP > Current US$: Imports of goods, services and income is the sum of goods (merchandise) imports, imports of (nonfactor) services and income (factor) payments. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • GDP per capita > PPP > Current international $: GDP per capita based on purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current international dollars.
  • Bank nonperfoming loans to total gross loans: Bank nonperforming loans to total gross loans are the value of nonperforming loans divided by the total value of the loan portfolio (including nonperforming loans before the deduction of specific loan-loss provisions). The loan amount recorded as nonperforming should be the gross value of the loan as recorded on the balance sheet, not just the amount that is overdue.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of parts-civilian aircraft per 1000: US exports of parts-civilian aircraft, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of leather and furs per million: US exports of leather and furs, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of other industrial supplies per 1000: US exports of other industrial supplies, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of other household goods per 1000: US exports of other household goods, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of laboratory testing instruments per 1000: US exports of laboratory testing instruments, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Trade > % of GDP: Trade is the sum of exports and imports of goods and services measured as a share of gross domestic product.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of other foods per 1000: US exports of other foods, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Tax > Components of taxation > Social security > Contribution by employer: Tax on employer's contribution of social security as a percentage of total tax collected by the country. Data is for 2002.
  • Gross capital formation > Current US$ > Per capita: Gross capital formation (formerly gross domestic investment) consists of outlays on additions to the fixed assets of the economy plus net changes in the level of inventories. Fixed assets include land improvements (fences, ditches, drains, and so on); plant, machinery, and equipment purchases; and the construction of roads, railways, and the like, including schools, offices, hospitals, private residential dwellings, and commercial and industrial buildings. Inventories are stocks of goods held by firms to meet temporary or unexpected fluctuations in production or sales, and "work in progress." According to the 1993 SNA, net acquisitions of valuables are also considered capital formation. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of jewelry > Etc per 1000: US exports of jewelry, etc, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • GDP per capita growth > Annual %: Annual percentage growth rate of GDP per capita based on constant local currency. GDP per capita is gross domestic product divided by midyear population. GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources.
  • Gross fixed capital formation > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Gross fixed capital formation (formerly gross domestic fixed investment) includes land improvements (fences, ditches, drains, and so on); plant, machinery, and equipment purchases; and the construction of roads, railways, and the like, including schools, offices, hospitals, private residential dwellings, and commercial and industrial buildings. According to the 1993 SNA, net acquisitions of valuables are also considered capital formation. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 $ gross domestic product.
  • Service > Exports > BoP > Current US$: Services (previously nonfactor services) refer to economic output of intangible commodities that may be produced, transferred, and consumed at the same time. International transactions in services are defined by the IMF's Balance of Payments Manual (1993), but definitions may nevertheless vary among reporting economies. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Net trade in goods > BoP > Current US$: Net trade in goods is the difference between exports and imports of goods. The category includes goods previously included in services: goods received or sent for processing and their subsequent export or import in the form of processed goods, repairs on goods, and goods procured in ports by carriers. Trade in services is not included. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Trade > With US > US > Exports of industrial rubber products per million: US exports of industrial rubber products, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • GDP > Constant 2000 US$: GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars. Dollar figures for GDP are converted from domestic currencies using 2000 official exchange rates. For a few countries where the official exchange rate does not reflect the rate effectively applied to actual foreign exchange transactions, an alternative conversion factor is used.
  • Merchandise > Exports > Current US$: Merchandise exports show the f.o.b. value of goods provided to the rest of the world valued in U.S. dollars. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • International tourism > Expenditures > Current US$: International tourism expenditures are expenditures of international outbound visitors in other countries, including payments to foreign carriers for international transport. These may include expenditures by residents traveling abroad as same-day visitors, except in cases where these are so important as to justify a separate classification. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Net income > BoP > Current US$: Net income refers to receipts and payments of employee compensation paid to nonresident workers and investment income (receipts and payments on direct investment, portfolio investment, other investments, and receipts on reserve assets). Income derived from the use of intangible assets is recorded under business services. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • GDP > Purchasing power parity > Per capita: This entry gives the gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. A nation's GDP at purchasing power parity (PPP) exchange rates is the sum value of all goods and services produced in the country valued at prices prevailing in the United States. This is the measure most economists prefer when looking at per-capita welfare and when comparing living conditions or use of resources across countries. The measure is difficult to compute, as a US dollar value has to be assigned to all goods and services in the country regardless of whether these goods and services have a direct equivalent in the United States (for example, the value of an ox-cart or non-US military equipment); as a result, PPP estimates for some countries are based on a small and sometimes different set of goods and services. In addition, many countries do not formally participate in the World Bank's PPP project that calculates these measures, so the resulting GDP estimates for these countries may lack precision. For many developing countries, PPP-based GDP measures are multiples of the official exchange rate (OER) measure. The difference between the OER- and PPP-denominated GDP values for most of the weathly industrialized countries are generally much smaller. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • GDP > Per capita: This entry gives the gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. A nation's GDP at purchasing power parity (PPP) exchange rates is the sum value of all goods and services produced in the country valued at prices prevailing in the United States. This is the measure most economists prefer when looking at per-capita welfare and when comparing living conditions or use of resources across countries. The measure is difficult to compute, as a US dollar value has to be assigned to all goods and services in the country regardless of whether these goods and services have a direct equivalent in the United States (for example, the value of an ox-cart or non-US military equipment); as a result, PPP estimates for some countries are based on a small and sometimes different set of goods and services. In addition, many countries do not formally participate in the World Bank's PPP project that calculates these measures, so the resulting GDP estimates for these countries may lack precision. For many developing countries, PPP-based GDP measures are multiples of the official exchange rate (OER) measure. The difference between the OER- and PPP-denominated GDP values for most of the weathly industrialized countries are generally much smaller. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • GDP > Official exchange rate > Per capita: This entry gives the gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. A nation's GDP at offical exchange rates (OER) is the home-currency-denominated annual GDP figure divided by the bilateral average US exchange rate with that country in that year. The measure is simple to compute and gives a precise measure of the value of output. Many economists prefer this measure when gauging the economic power an economy maintains vis-a-vis its neighbors, judging that an exchange rate captures the purchasing power a nation enjoys in the international marketplace. Official exchange rates, however, can be artifically fixed and/or subject to manipulation - resulting in claims of the country having an under- or over-valued currency - and are not necessarily the equivalent of a market-determined exchange rate. Moreover, even if the official exchange rate is market-determined, market exchange rates are frequently established by a relatively small set of goods and services (the ones the country trades) and may not capture the value of the larger set of goods the country produces. Furthermore, OER-converted GDP is not well suited to comparing domestic GDP over time, since appreciation/depreciation from one year to the next will make the OER GDP value rise/fall regardless of whether home-currency-denominated GDP changed. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Household final > Consumption expenditure > Constant 2000 US$: Household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption) is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country. Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars.
  • Market capitalization of listed companies > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Market capitalization (also known as market value) is the share price times the number of shares outstanding. Listed domestic companies are the domestically incorporated companies listed on the country's stock exchanges at the end of the year. Listed companies does not include investment companies, mutual funds, or other collective investment vehicles. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • Trade > Exports of goods > Services and income > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Exports of goods, services and income is the sum of goods (merchandise) exports, exports of (nonfactor) services and income (factor) receipts. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 $ gross domestic product.
  • Trade > With US > US imports of engines for civilian aircraft per 1000: US imports of engines for civilian aircraft, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • GDP > CIA Factbook > Per capita: Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • GDP > Constant 2000 US$ > Per capita: GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars. Dollar figures for GDP are converted from domestic currencies using 2000 official exchange rates. For a few countries where the official exchange rate does not reflect the rate effectively applied to actual foreign exchange transactions, an alternative conversion factor is used. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • GDP > PPP > Constant 2000 international $ > Per capita: PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant 2000 international dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • GDP > PPP > Current international $ > Per capita: PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current international dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • GNI > Current US$ > Per capita: GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • GNI > Atlas method > Current US$ > Per capita: GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current U.S. dollars. GNI, calculated in national currency, is usually converted to U.S. dollars at official exchange rates for comparisons across economies, although an alternative rate is used when the official exchange rate is judged to diverge by an exceptionally large margin from the rate actually applied in international transactions. To smooth fluctuations in prices and exchange rates, a special Atlas method of conversion is used by the World Bank. This applies a conversion factor that averages the exchange rate for a given year and the two preceding years, adjusted for differences in rates of inflation between the country, and through 2000, the G-5 countries (France, Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States). From 2001, these countries include the Euro Zone, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • GNI > PPP > Current international $ > Per capita: PPP GNI (formerly PPP GNP) is gross national income converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GNI as a U.S. dollar has in the United States. Gross national income (GNI) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current international dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Goods > Exports > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita: Goods exports refer to all movable goods (including nonmonetary gold) involved in a change of ownership from residents to nonresidents. The category includes goods previously included in services: goods received or sent for processing and their subsequent export or import in the form of processed goods, repairs on goods, and goods procured in ports by carriers. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Grants and other revenue > % of revenue: Grants and other revenue include grants from other foreign governments, international organizations, and other government units; interest; dividends; rent; requited, nonrepayable receipts for public purposes (such as fines, administrative fees, and entrepreneurial income from government owner­ship of property); and voluntary, unrequited, nonrepayable receipts other than grants.
  • Current transfers > Receipts > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Current transfers (receipts) are recorded in the balance of payments whenever an economy receives goods, services, income, or financial items without a quid pro quo. All transfers not considered to be capital are current. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • Trade > With US > US imports of engines and engine parts per 1000: US imports of engines and engine parts, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Gross domestic savings > Current US$ > Per capita: Gross domestic savings are calculated as GDP less final consumption expenditure (total consumption). Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Gross fixed capital formation > Constant 2000 US$ > Per capita: Gross fixed capital formation (formerly gross domestic fixed investment) includes land improvements (fences, ditches, drains, and so on); plant, machinery, and equipment purchases; and the construction of roads, railways, and the like, including schools, offices, hospitals, private residential dwellings, and commercial and industrial buildings. According to the 1993 SNA, net acquisitions of valuables are also considered capital formation. Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Gross fixed capital formation > Current US$ > Per capita: Gross fixed capital formation (formerly gross domestic fixed investment) includes land improvements (fences, ditches, drains, and so on); plant, machinery, and equipment purchases; and the construction of roads, railways, and the like, including schools, offices, hospitals, private residential dwellings, and commercial and industrial buildings. According to the 1993 SNA, net acquisitions of valuables are also considered capital formation. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Gross national expenditure > Current US$ > Per capita: Gross national expenditure (formerly domestic absorption) is the sum of household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption), general government final consumption expenditure (formerly general government consumption), and gross capital formation (formerly gross domestic investment). Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Gross value added at factor cost > Constant 2000 US$ > Per capita: Gross value added at factor cost (formerly GDP at factor cost) is derived as the sum of the value added in the agriculture, industry and services sectors. If the value added of these sectors is calculated at purchaser values, gross value added at factor cost is derived by subtracting net product taxes from GDP. Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Gross value added at factor cost > Current US$ > Per capita: Gross value added at factor cost (formerly GDP at factor cost) is derived as the sum of the value added in the agriculture, industry and services sectors. If the value added of these sectors is calculated at purchaser values, gross value added at factor cost is derived by subtracting net product taxes from GDP. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • High-technology > Exports > % of manufactured > Exports: High-technology exports are products with high research and development intensity, such as in aerospace, computers, pharmaceuticals, scientific instruments, and electrical machinery."
  • Household final > Consumption expenditure > Constant 2000 US$ > Per capita: Household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption) is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country. Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Trade > With US > US imports of finished textile industrial supplies per million: US imports of finished textile industrial supplies, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Household final > Consumption expenditure > Current US$ > Per capita: Household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption) is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Household final > Consumption expenditure per capita growth > Annual %: Annual percentage growth of household final consumption expenditure per capita, which is calculated using household final consumption expenditure in constant 2000 prices and World Bank population estimates. Household final consumption expenditure (private consumption) is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country.
  • Household final > Consumption expenditure > Etc. > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption) is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country. This item also includes any statistical discrepancy in the use of resources relative to the supply of resources. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 $ gross domestic product.
  • Household final > Consumption expenditure > Etc. > Current US$ > Per capita: Household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption) is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country. This item also includes any statistical discrepancy in the use of resources relative to the supply of resources. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Trade > Imports: This entry provides the total US dollar amount of merchandise imports on a c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight) or f.o.b. (free on board) basis. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms.
  • Trade > Imports > Per capita: This entry provides the total US dollar amount of merchandise imports on a c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight) or f.o.b. (free on board) basis. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Trade > Imports > Per $ GDP: This entry provides the total US dollar amount of merchandise imports on a c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight) or f.o.b. (free on board) basis. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 $ gross domestic product.
  • Trade > Imports > Goods and services > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita: Imports of goods and services comprise all transactions between residents of a country and the rest of the world involving a change of ownership from nonresidents to residents of general merchandise, goods sent for processing and repairs, nonmonetary gold, and services. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Trade > Imports > Goods and services > Constant 2000 US$ > Per capita: Imports of goods and services represent the value of all goods and other market services received from the rest of the world. They include the value of merchandise, freight, insurance, transport, travel, royalties, license fees, and other services, such as communication, construction, financial, information, business, personal, and government services. They exclude labor and property income (formerly called factor services) as well as transfer payments. Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Trade > Imports > Goods and services > Current US$ > Per capita: Imports of goods and services represent the value of all goods and other market services received from the rest of the world. They include the value of merchandise, freight, insurance, transport, travel, royalties, license fees, and other services, such as communication, construction, financial, information, business, personal, and government services. They exclude labor and property income (formerly called factor services) as well as transfer payments. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Trade > Imports of goods > Services and income > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita: Imports of goods, services and income is the sum of goods (merchandise) imports, imports of (nonfactor) services and income (factor) payments. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Income payments > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita: Income payments refer to employee compensation paid to nonresident workers and investment income (payments on direct investment, portfolio investment, other investments). Income derived from the use of intangible assets is excluded from income and recorded under business services. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Income receipts > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita: Income receipts refer to employee compensation paid to resident workers working abroad and investment income (receipts on direct investment, portfolio investment, other investments, and receipts on reserve assets). Income derived from the use of intangible assets is excluded from income and recorded under business services. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Services > Etc. > Value added > Constant 2000 US$: Services correspond to ISIC divisions 50-99. They include value added in wholesale and retail trade (including hotels and restaurants), transport, and government, financial, professional, and personal services such as education, health care, and real estate services. Also included are imputed bank service charges, import duties, and any statistical discrepancies noted by national compilers as well as discrepancies arising from rescaling. Value added is the net output of a sector after adding up all outputs and subtracting intermediate inputs. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or depletion and degradation of natural resources. The industrial origin of value added is determined by the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 3. Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars.
  • Trade > With US > US imports of generators > Transformers > And accessories per 1000: US imports of generators, transformers, and accessories, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Insurance and financial services > % of commercial service > Exports: Insurance and financial services cover freight insurance on goods exported and other direct insurance such as life insurance; financial intermediation services such as commissions, foreign exchange transactions, and brokerage services; and auxiliary services such as financial market operational and regulatory services.
  • Insurance and financial services > % of commercial service imports: Insurance and financial services cover freight insurance on goods exported and other direct insurance such as life insurance; financial intermediation services such as commissions, foreign exchange transactions, and brokerage services; and auxiliary services such as financial market operational and regulatory services.
  • International tourism > Expenditures > Current US$ > Per capita: International tourism expenditures are expenditures of international outbound visitors in other countries, including payments to foreign carriers for international transport. These may include expenditures by residents traveling abroad as same-day visitors, except in cases where these are so important as to justify a separate classification. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • International tourism > Receipts > Current US$ > Per capita: International tourism receipts are expenditures by international inbound visitors, including payments to national carriers for international transport. These receipts should include any other prepayment made for goods or services received in the destination country. They also may include receipts from same-day visitors, except in cases where these are so important as to justify a separate classification. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • GDP per unit of energy use: GDP per unit of energy use is the PPP GDP per kilogram of oil equivalent of energy use. PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to 2000 constant international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as a U.S. dollar has in the United States.
  • Listed domestic companies > Per capita: Listed domestic companies are the domestically incorporated companies listed on the country's stock exchanges at the end of the year. This indicator does not include investment companies, mutual funds, or other collective investment vehicles. Per capita figures expressed per 1 million population.
  • Trade > With US > US imports of household and kitchen appliances per 1000: US imports of household and kitchen appliances, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Market capitalization of listed companies > Current US$ > Per capita: Market capitalization (also known as market value) is the share price times the number of shares outstanding. Listed domestic companies are the domestically incorporated companies listed on the country's stock exchanges at the end of the year. Listed companies does not include investment companies, mutual funds, or other collective investment vehicles. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Market value of publicly traded shares > Per $ GDP: Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • Market value of publicly traded shares > Per capita: Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Merchandise > Exports > Current US$ > Per capita: Merchandise exports show the f.o.b. value of goods provided to the rest of the world valued in U.S. dollars. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Micro > Small and medium enterprises > Number > Per capita: Micro, small, and medium-size enterprises are business that may be defined by the number of employees. There is no international standard definition of firm size; however, many institutions that collect information use the following size categories: micro enterprises have 0-9 employees, small enterprises have 10-49 employees, and medium-size enterprises have 50-249 employees. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Merchandise imports > Current US$: Merchandise imports show the c.i.f. value of goods received from the rest of the world valued in U.S. dollars. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Merchandise imports > Current US$ > Per capita: Merchandise imports show the c.i.f. value of goods received from the rest of the world valued in U.S. dollars. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Net capital account > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita: Net capital account includes government debt forgiveness, investment grants in cash or in kind by a government entity, and taxes on capital transfers. Also included are migrants' capital transfers and debt forgiveness and investment grants by nongovernmental entities. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Trade > With US > US imports of industrial organic chemicals per 1000: US imports of industrial organic chemicals, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Trade > With US > US imports of industrial inorganic chemicals per 1000: US imports of industrial inorganic chemicals, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Net current transfers > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Net current transfers are recorded in the balance of payments whenever an economy provides or receives goods, services, income, or financial items without a quid pro quo. All transfers not considered to be capital are current. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • Net current transfers > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita: Net current transfers are recorded in the balance of payments whenever an economy provides or receives goods, services, income, or financial items without a quid pro quo. All transfers not considered to be capital are current. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Net errors and omissions > Adjusted > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Net errors and omissions constitute a residual category needed to ensure that all debit and credit entries in the balance of payments statement sum to zero. In the International Financial Statistics presentation, this is equal to the difference between reserves and related items and the sum of the balances of the current, capital, and financial accounts. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • Net errors and omissions > Adjusted > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita: Net errors and omissions constitute a residual category needed to ensure that all debit and credit entries in the balance of payments statement sum to zero. In the International Financial Statistics presentation, this is equal to the difference between reserves and related items and the sum of the balances of the current, capital, and financial accounts. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 billion population.
  • Foreign direct investment > Net inflows > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita: Foreign direct investment are the net inflows of investment to acquire a lasting management interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than that of the investor. It is the sum of equity capital, reinvestment of earnings, other long-term capital, and short-term capital as shown in the balance of payments. This series shows net inflows in the reporting economy. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Foreign direct investment > Net > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita: Foreign direct investment is net inflows of investment to acquire a lasting management interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than that of the investor. It is the sum of equity capital, reinvestment of earnings, other long-term capital, and short-term capital as shown in the balance of payments. This series shows total net, that is, net FDI in the reporting economy from foreign sources less net FDI by the reporting economy to the rest of the world. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Trade > With US > US imports of iron and steel manufactures-advanced per 1000: US imports of iron and steel manufactures-advanced, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Trade > With US > US imports of marine engines and parts per million: US imports of marine engines and parts, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Trade > With US > US imports of leather and furs-unmanufactured per million: US imports of leather and furs-unmanufactured, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Trade > With US > US imports of miscellaneous nonferrous metals per 1000: US imports of miscellaneous nonferrous metals, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Net income > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Net income refers to receipts and payments of employee compensation paid to nonresident workers and investment income (receipts and payments on direct investment, portfolio investment, other investments, and receipts on reserve assets). Income derived from the use of intangible assets is recorded under business services. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • Net income > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita: Net income refers to receipts and payments of employee compensation paid to nonresident workers and investment income (receipts and payments on direct investment, portfolio investment, other investments, and receipts on reserve assets). Income derived from the use of intangible assets is recorded under business services. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Net income from abroad > Current US$ > Per capita: Net income includes the net labor income and net property and entrepreneurial income components of the SNA. Labor income covers compensation of employees paid to nonresident workers. Property and entrepreneurial income covers investment income from the ownership of foreign financial claims (interest, dividends, rent, etc.) and nonfinancial property income (patents, copyrights, etc.). Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 million population.
  • Net trade in goods > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita: Net trade in goods is the difference between exports and imports of goods. The category includes goods previously included in services: goods received or sent for processing and their subsequent export or import in the form of processed goods, repairs on goods, and goods procured in ports by carriers. Trade in services is not included. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Trade > With US > US imports of materials handling equipment per 1000: US imports of materials handling equipment, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Trade > With US > US imports of motorcycles and parts per million: US imports of motorcycles and parts, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • New businesses registered > Number > Per capita: New businesses registered are the number of new firms, defined as firms registered in the current year of reporting." Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Net trade in goods and services > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Net trade in goods and services is derived by offsetting imports of goods and services against exports of goods and services. Exports and imports of goods and services comprise all transactions involving a change of ownership of goods and services between residents of one country and the rest of the world. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • Net trade in goods and services > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita: Net trade in goods and services is derived by offsetting imports of goods and services against exports of goods and services. Exports and imports of goods and services comprise all transactions involving a change of ownership of goods and services between residents of one country and the rest of the world. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Goods imports > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Goods imports refer to all movable goods (including nonmonetary gold) involved in a change of ownership from nonresidents to residents. The category includes goods previously included in services: goods received or sent for processing and their subsequent export or import in the form of processed goods, repairs on goods, and goods procured in ports by carriers. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 $ gross domestic product.
  • Portfolio investment > Excluding LCFAR > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita: Portfolio investment excluding liabilities constituting foreign authorities' reserves covers transactions in equity securities and debt securities. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Trade > With US > US imports of numismatic coins per million: US imports of numismatic coins, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Final > Consumption expenditure > Etc. > Current US$ > Per capita: Final consumption expenditure (formerly total consumption) is the sum of household final consumption expenditure (private consumption) and general government final consumption expenditure (general government consumption). This estimate includes any statistical discrepancy in the use of resources relative to the supply of resources. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Reserves of foreign exchange and gold > Per $ GDP: This entry gives the dollar value for the stock of all financial assets that are available to the central monetary authority for use in meeting a country's balance of payments needs as of the end-date of the period specified. This category includes not only foreign currency and gold, but also a country's holdings of Special Drawing Rights in the International Monetary Fund, and its reserve position in the Fund. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • Reserves of foreign exchange and gold > Per capita: This entry gives the dollar value for the stock of all financial assets that are available to the central monetary authority for use in meeting a country's balance of payments needs as of the end-date of the period specified. This category includes not only foreign currency and gold, but also a country's holdings of Special Drawing Rights in the International Monetary Fund, and its reserve position in the Fund. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Royalty and license fees > Payments > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita: Royalty and license fees are payments and receipts between residents and nonresidents for the authorized use of intangible, nonproduced, nonfinancial assets and proprietary rights (such as patents, copyrights, trademarks, industrial processes, and franchises) and for the use, through licensing agreements, of produced originals of prototypes (such as films and manuscripts). Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Royalty and license fees > Payments > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Royalty and license fees are payments and receipts between residents and nonresidents for the authorized use of intangible, nonproduced, nonfinancial assets and proprietary rights (such as patents, copyrights, trademarks, industrial processes, and franchises) and for the use, through licensing agreements, of produced originals of prototypes (such as films and manuscripts). Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 million $ gross domestic product.
  • Royalty and license fees > Receipts > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita: Royalty and license fees are payments and receipts between residents and nonresidents for the authorized use of intangible, nonproduced, nonfinancial assets and proprietary rights (such as patents, copyrights, trademarks, industrial processes, and franchises) and for the use, through licensing agreements, of produced originals of prototypes (such as films and manuscripts). Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Service > Exports > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Services (previously nonfactor services) refer to economic output of intangible commodities that may be produced, transferred, and consumed at the same time. International transactions in services are defined by the IMF's Balance of Payments Manual (1993), but definitions may nevertheless vary among reporting economies. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • Final > Consumption expenditure > Current US$: Final consumption expenditure (formerly total consumption) is the sum of household final consumption expenditure (private consumption) and general government final consumption expenditure (general government consumption). Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Service imports > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita: Services (previously nonfactor services) refer to economic output of intangible commodities that may be produced, transferred, and consumed at the same time. International transactions in services are defined by the IMF's Balance of Payments Manual (1993), but definitions may nevertheless vary among reporting economies. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Trade > With US > US imports of nuts and preparations per million: US imports of nuts and preparations, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Services > Etc. > Value added > Constant 2000 US$ > Per capita: Services correspond to ISIC divisions 50-99. They include value added in wholesale and retail trade (including hotels and restaurants), transport, and government, financial, professional, and personal services such as education, health care, and real estate services. Also included are imputed bank service charges, import duties, and any statistical discrepancies noted by national compilers as well as discrepancies arising from rescaling. Value added is the net output of a sector after adding up all outputs and subtracting intermediate inputs. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or depletion and degradation of natural resources. The industrial origin of value added is determined by the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 3. Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Services > Etc. > Value added > Current US$ > Per capita: Services correspond to ISIC divisions 50-99. They include value added in wholesale and retail trade (including hotels and restaurants), transport, and government, financial, professional, and personal services such as education, health care, and real estate services. Also included are imputed bank service charges, import duties, and any statistical discrepancies noted by national compilers as well as discrepancies arising from rescaling. Value added is the net output of a sector after adding up all outputs and subtracting intermediate inputs. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or depletion and degradation of natural resources. The industrial origin of value added is determined by the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 3. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Share of household income > Highest 10%: The percentage of total national household income held by the top 10 percent of households. Data on household income or consumption come from household surveys, the results adjusted for household size. Nations use different standards and procedures in collecting and adjusting the data. Surveys based on income will normally show a more unequal distribution than surveys based on consumption. The quality of surveys is improving with time, yet caution is still necessary in making inter-country comparisons.
  • Share of household income > Lowest 10%: The percentage of total national household income held by the bottom 10 percent of households. Data on household income or consumption come from household surveys, the results adjusted for household size. Nations use different standards and procedures in collecting and adjusting the data. Surveys based on income will normally show a more unequal distribution than surveys based on consumption. The quality of surveys is improving with time, yet caution is still necessary in making inter-country comparisons.
  • Final > Consumption expenditure > Current US$ > Per capita: Final consumption expenditure (formerly total consumption) is the sum of household final consumption expenditure (private consumption) and general government final consumption expenditure (general government consumption). Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Final > Consumption expenditure > Constant 2000 US$ > Per capita: Final consumption expenditure (formerly total consumption) is the sum of household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption) and general government final consumption expenditure (formerly general government consumption). Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Trade > With US > US imports of other materials > Except chemicals per million: US imports of other materials, except chemicals, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Total > Reserves > Includes gold > Current US$ > Per capita: Total reserves comprise holdings of monetary gold, special drawing rights, reserves of IMF members held by the IMF, and holdings of foreign exchange under the control of monetary authorities. The gold component of these reserves is valued at year-end (December 31) London prices. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Total > Reserves minus gold > Current US$ > Per capita: Total reserves minus gold comprise special drawing rights, reserves of IMF members held by the IMF, and holdings of foreign exchange under the control of monetary authorities. Gold holdings are excluded. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Tourism expenditures > International > Per capita: Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Tourism receipts > International > Per capita: Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Tourist arrivals > Per capita: International inbound tourists (overnight visitors) are the number of tourists who travel to a country other than that in which they have their usual residence, but outside their usual environment, for a period not exceeding 12 months and whose main purpose in visiting is other than an activity remunerated from within the country visited. When data on number of tourists are not available, the number of visitors, which includes tourists, same-day visitors, cruise passengers, and crew members, is shown instead. Sources and collection methods for arrivals differ across countries. In some cases data are from border statistics (police, immigration, and the like) and supplemented by border surveys. In other cases data are from tourism accommodation establishments. For some countries number of arrivals is limited to arrivals by air and for others to arrivals staying in hotels. Some countries include arrivals of nationals residing abroad while others do not. Caution should thus be used in comparing arrivals across countries. The data on inbound tourists refer to the number of arrivals, not to the number of people traveling. Thus a person who makes several trips to a country during a given period is counted each time as a new arrival." Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Trade > With US > US imports of photographic and optical equipment per million: US imports of photographic and optical equipment, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Trade > With US > US imports of pulp and paper machinery per 1000: US imports of pulp and paper machinery, USD Thousands, 2004. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Budget > Expenditures > Capital > Per $ GDP: This entry includes revenues, expenditures, and capital expenditures. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product
  • Income share held by third 20%: Percentage share of income or consumption is the share that accrues to subgroups of population indicated by deciles or quintiles. Percentage shares by quintile may not sum to 100 because of rounding.
STAT Japan Luxembourg HISTORY
Companies > Listed domestic companies, total per million 27.2
Ranked 35th.
54.57
Ranked 15th. Twice as much as Japan

Debt > External $3.02 trillion
Ranked 5th. 14% more than Luxembourg
$2.64 trillion
Ranked 6th.

Distribution of family income > Gini index 37.6
Ranked 6th. 45% more than Luxembourg
26
Ranked 42nd.

GDP $5.96 trillion
Ranked 4th. 104 times more than Luxembourg
$57.12 billion
Ranked 67th.

GDP > Composition, by end use > Exports of goods and services 14.7%
Ranked 179th.
171%
Ranked 3rd. 12 times more than Japan
GDP > Composition, by end use > Investment in inventories -0.6%
Ranked 159th.
1.3%
Ranked 49th.
GDP > Real growth rate 2%
Ranked 119th. 7 times more than Luxembourg
0.3%
Ranked 150th.

GDP per capita $46,720.36
Ranked 12th.
$107,475.95
Ranked 1st. 2 times more than Japan

GINI index 24.85
Ranked 31st.
30.76
Ranked 31st. 24% more than Japan
Gross National Income $4.52 trillion
Ranked 2nd. 257 times more than Luxembourg
$17.57 billion
Ranked 61st.
Household income or consumption by percentage share > Highest 10% 27.5%
Ranked 20th. 16% more than Luxembourg
23.8%
Ranked 15th.
Human Development Index 0.943
Ranked 11th.
0.949
Ranked 5th. 1% more than Japan
Imports > Commodities petroleum 15.5%; liquid natural gas 5.7%; clothing 3.9%; semiconductors 3.5%; coal 3.5%; audio and visual apparatus 2.7% minerals, metals, foodstuffs, quality consumer goods
Public debt 219.1% of GDP
Ranked 2nd. 11 times more than Luxembourg
20.8% of GDP
Ranked 127th.

Tourist arrivals 8.35 million
Ranked 26th. 10 times more than Luxembourg
879,000
Ranked 88th.

Fiscal year 1 calendar year
Central bank discount rate 0.1%
Ranked 51st.
1.5%
Ranked 45th. 15 times more than Japan

Exchange rates yen (JPY) per US dollar -<br />79.79 (2012 est.)<br />79.81 (2011 est.)<br />87.78 (2010 est.)<br />93.57 (2009)<br />103.58 (2008) euros (EUR) per US dollar -<br />0.78 (2012 est.)<br />0.72 (2011 est.)<br />0.76 (2010 est.)<br />0.72 (2009 est.)<br />0.68 (2008 est.)
Exports > Commodities motor vehicles 13.6%; semiconductors 6.2%; iron and steel products 5.5%; auto parts 4.6%; plastic materials 3.5%; power generating machinery 3.5% machinery and equipment, steel products, chemicals, rubber products, glass
GDP > Composition by sector > Services 71.4%
Ranked 36th.
86%
Ranked 1st. 20% more than Japan

GDP > Per capita > PPP $35,900
Ranked 22nd.
$78,000
Ranked 2nd. 2 times more than Japan

Current account balance $60.8 billion
Ranked 11th. 19 times more than Luxembourg
$3.27 billion
Ranked 31st.

Companies > Market capitalization of listed companies > % of GDP 61.76%
Ranked 32nd.
127.48%
Ranked 6th. 2 times more than Japan

Commercial bank prime lending rate 1.48%
Ranked 178th.
2.28%
Ranked 183th. 54% more than Japan

GDP > Composition, by sector of origin > Agriculture 1.1%
Ranked 192nd. 4 times more than Luxembourg
0.3%
Ranked 213th.
Stock of direct foreign investment > At home $222.2 billion
Ranked 25th. 20 times more than Luxembourg
$11.21 billion
Ranked 5th.
Imports $830.1 billion
Ranked 4th. 35 times more than Luxembourg
$23.78 billion
Ranked 69th.

Taxes and other revenues 33.8% of GDP
Ranked 63th.
42.7% of GDP
Ranked 28th. 26% more than Japan

Companies > Stock market > Stocks traded, total value > Current US$ per capita $28,263.96
Ranked 10th. 130 times more than Luxembourg
$217.32
Ranked 56th.

GDP > Purchasing power parity $4.58 trillion
Ranked 4th. 109 times more than Luxembourg
$41.86 billion
Ranked 96th.

GDP > Composition, by end use > Investment in fixed capital 21.2%
Ranked 104th.
21.6%
Ranked 99th. 2% more than Japan
Stock of narrow money None None
Labor force > By occupation > Services 69.8%
Ranked 12th.
80.6%
Ranked 1st. 15% more than Japan
GDP > Composition, by sector of origin > Services 72.8%
Ranked 34th.
86.1%
Ranked 6th. 18% more than Japan
GDP > Composition, by sector of origin > Industry 26.1%
Ranked 112th. 93% more than Luxembourg
13.5%
Ranked 195th.
Companies > Stock market > Stocks traded, turnover ratio > % 99.85%
Ranked 9th. 596 times more than Luxembourg
0.167%
Ranked 106th.

Budget > Revenues $1.99 trillion
Ranked 2nd. 83 times more than Luxembourg
$24.07 billion
Ranked 65th.

Budget > Expenditures $2.58 trillion
Ranked 2nd. 105 times more than Luxembourg
$24.53 billion
Ranked 67th.

Labor force > By occupation > Industry 26.2%
Ranked 34th. 52% more than Luxembourg
17.2%
Ranked 103th.

Overview In the years following World War II, government-industry cooperation, a strong work ethic, mastery of high technology, and a comparatively small defense allocation (1% of GDP) helped Japan develop a technologically advanced economy. Two notable characteristics of the post-war economy were the close interlocking structures of manufacturers, suppliers, and distributors, known as keiretsu, and the guarantee of lifetime employment for a substantial portion of the urban labor force. Both features are now eroding under the dual pressures of global competition and domestic demographic change. Japan's industrial sector is heavily dependent on imported raw materials and fuels. A small agricultural sector is highly subsidized and protected, with crop yields among the highest in the world. While self-sufficient in rice production, Japan imports about 60% of its food on a caloric basis. For three decades, overall real economic growth had been spectacular - a 10% average in the 1960s, a 5% average in the 1970s, and a 4% average in the 1980s. Growth slowed markedly in the 1990s, averaging just 1.7%, largely because of the after effects of inefficient investment and an asset price bubble in the late 1980s that required a protracted period of time for firms to reduce excess debt, capital, and labor. Modest economic growth continued after 2000, but the economy has fallen into recession three times since 2008. A sharp downturn in business investment and global demand for Japan's exports in late 2008 pushed Japan into recession. Government stimulus spending helped the economy recover in late 2009 and 2010, but the economy contracted again in 2011 as the massive 9.0 magnitude earthquake and the ensuing tsunami in March disrupted manufacturing. The economy has largely recovered in the two years since the disaster, but reconstruction in the Tohoku region has been uneven. Newly-elected Prime Minister Shinzo ABE has declared the economy his government's top priority; he has pledged to reconsider his predecessor's plan to permanently close nuclear power plants and is pursuing an economic revitalization agenda of fiscal stimulus and regulatory reform and has said he will press the Bank of Japan to loosen monetary policy. Measured on a purchasing power parity (PPP) basis that adjusts for price differences, Japan in 2012 stood as the fourth-largest economy in the world after second-place China, which surpassed Japan in 2001, and third-place India, which edged out Japan in 2012. The new government will continue a longstanding debate on restructuring the economy and reining in Japan's huge government debt, which exceeds 200% of GDP. Persistent deflation, reliance on exports to drive growth, and an aging and shrinking population are other major long-term challenges for the economy. This small, stable, high-income economy - benefiting from its proximity to France, Belgium, and Germany - has historically featured solid growth, low inflation, and low unemployment. The industrial sector, initially dominated by steel, has become increasingly diversified to include chemicals, rubber, and other products. Growth in the financial sector, which now accounts for about 27% of GDP, has more than compensated for the decline in steel. Most banks are foreign-owned and have extensive foreign dealings, but Luxembourg has lost some of its advantages as a favorable tax location because of OECD and EU pressure. The economy depends on foreign and cross-border workers for about 40% of its labor force. Luxembourg, like all EU members, suffered from the global economic crisis that began in late 2008, but unemployment has trended below the EU average. Following strong expansion from 2004 to 2007, Luxembourg's economy contracted 3.6% in 2009, but rebounded in 2010-11 before slowing again in 2012. The country continues to enjoy an extraordinarily high standard of living - GDP per capita ranks among the highest in the world, and is the highest in the euro zone. Turmoil in the world financial markets and lower global demand during 2008-09 prompted the government to inject capital into the banking sector and implement stimulus measures to boost the economy. Government stimulus measures and support for the banking sector, however, led to a 5% government budget deficit in 2009. Nevertheless, the deficit was cut to 1.1% in 2011 and 0.9% in 2012. Even during the financial crisis and recovery, Luxembourg retained the highest current account surplus as a share of GDP in the euro zone, owing largely to their strength in financial services. Public debt remains among the lowest of the region although it has more than doubled since 2007 as percentage of GDP. Luxembourg's economy, while stabile, grew slowly in 2012 due to ongoing weak growth in the euro area. Authorities have strengthened supervision of domestic banks because of their exposure to the activities of foreign banks.
Market value of publicly traded shares $4.01 trillion
Ranked 1st. 59 times more than Luxembourg
$67.63 billion
Ranked 43th.

Labor force > By occupation > Agriculture 3.9%
Ranked 151st. 77% more than Luxembourg
2.2%
Ranked 165th.

Companies > Stock market > Stocks traded, total value > Current US$ $3.61 trillion
Ranked 4th. 31217 times more than Luxembourg
$115.49 million
Ranked 82nd.

Companies > Market capitalization of listed companies > Current US$ per capita $28,856.53
Ranked 16th.
$132,354.92
Ranked 3rd. 5 times more than Japan

Reserves of foreign exchange and gold $1.27 trillion
Ranked 2nd. 1280 times more than Luxembourg
$991 million
Ranked 133th.

Stock of domestic credit $13.72 trillion
Ranked 2nd. 141 times more than Luxembourg
$97.39 billion
Ranked 50th.

GDP > Composition, by end use > Household consumption 60.9%
Ranked 107th. 95% more than Luxembourg
31.2%
Ranked 180th.
Budget surplus > + or deficit > - -10% of GDP
Ranked 171st. 13 times more than Luxembourg
-0.8% of GDP
Ranked 50th.

GDP > Composition, by end use > Imports of goods and services -16.6%
Ranked 3rd.
-142.1%
Ranked 181st. 9 times more than Japan
Exports > Partners China 18.1%, US 17.8%, South Korea 7.7%, Thailand 5.5%, Hong Kong 5.1% Germany 21.5%, France 15.5%, Belgium 14.5%, UK 5.8%, Italy 5.6%, Switzerland 4.7%
Companies > Market capitalization of listed companies > Current US$, % of GDP 61.76%
Ranked 31st.
123.15%
Ranked 7th. Twice as much as Japan

Industrial production growth rate 1%
Ranked 116th.
-2.9%
Ranked 152nd.

Industries among world's largest and technologically advanced producers of motor vehicles, electronic equipment, machine tools, steel and nonferrous metals, ships, chemicals, textiles, processed foods banking and financial services, iron and steel, information technology, telecommunications, cargo transportation, food processing, chemicals, metal products, engineering, tires, glass, aluminum, tourism
Imports > Partners China 21.3%, US 8.8%, Australia 6.4%, Saudi Arabia 6.2%, UAE 5%, South Korea 4.6%, Qatar 4% Belgium 30.6%, Germany 23.6%, France 10.4%, US 8.3%, China 7.2%, Netherlands 5.1%
Household income or consumption by percentage share > Lowest 10% 1.9%
Ranked 109th.
3.5%
Ranked 31st. 84% more than Japan

Companies > Listed domestic companies, total 3,470
Ranked 5th. 120 times more than Luxembourg
29
Ranked 88th.

Labor force 65
Ranked 53th.
208
Ranked 30th. 3 times more than Japan

Agriculture > Products rice, sugar beets, vegetables, fruit; pork, poultry, dairy products, eggs; fish grapes, barley, oats, potatoes, wheat, fruits; dairy and livestock products
GDP > Composition by sector > Agriculture 1.2%
Ranked 190th. 3 times more than Luxembourg
0.4%
Ranked 207th.

Companies > Stock market > Stocks traded, total value > Current US$, % of GDP 60.5%
Ranked 14th. 299 times more than Luxembourg
0.202%
Ranked 84th.

Stock of broad money None None
GDP > Official exchange rate $5.88 trillion
Ranked 3rd. 104 times more than Luxembourg
$56.37 billion
Ranked 73th.

Inflation rate > Consumer prices 0.0
Ranked 196th.
2.7%
Ranked 133th.

Companies > Stock market > Stocks traded, total value > % of GDP 60.5%
Ranked 14th. 289 times more than Luxembourg
0.209%
Ranked 85th.

GDP > Composition, by end use > Government consumption 20.5%
Ranked 40th. 21% more than Luxembourg
16.9%
Ranked 86th.
Exports $776.6 billion
Ranked 4th. 49 times more than Luxembourg
$15.93 billion
Ranked 75th.

Unemployment rate 4.4%
Ranked 94th.
6.1%
Ranked 71st. 39% more than Japan

GDP > Composition by sector > Industry 27.5%
Ranked 98th. 2 times more than Luxembourg
13.6%
Ranked 192nd.

Companies > Market capitalization of listed companies > Current US$ $3.68 trillion
Ranked 4th. 52 times more than Luxembourg
$70.34 billion
Ranked 44th.

Technology index 5.68
Ranked 5th. 33% more than Luxembourg
4.28
Ranked 40th.
GDP > PPP $3.77 trillion
Ranked 3rd. 122 times more than Luxembourg
$30.92 billion
Ranked 87th.
Consumer price index 97.83%
Ranked 156th.
112.05%
Ranked 117th. 15% more than Japan

Budget > Revenues per capita $12,852.05
Ranked 19th.
$41,187.25
Ranked 2nd. 3 times more than Japan

Consumer spending 59.59
Ranked 83th. 79% more than Luxembourg
33.35
Ranked 124th.

Economic freedom 2.5
Ranked 36th.
3.3
Ranked 4th. 32% more than Japan
Economic aid > Donor $7.5 billion
Ranked 5th. 26 times more than Luxembourg
$291 million
Ranked 22nd.
Industrial > Production growth rate 15.5%
Ranked 8th. 9 times more than Luxembourg
1.7%
Ranked 2nd.

Real interest rate 3.55%
Ranked 82nd.
5.7%
Ranked 112th. 61% more than Japan

Outbound tourist spending 38.98 billion
Ranked 7th. 10 times more than Luxembourg
3.84 billion
Ranked 44th.

Business efficiency 68.65
Ranked 19th.
80.31
Ranked 10th. 17% more than Japan
GDP per person 39,738.13
Ranked 18th.
105,043.65
Ranked 1st. 3 times more than Japan

Inflation 100.31
Ranked 162nd.
109.01
Ranked 145th. 9% more than Japan

Deposit interest rate 0.27%
Ranked 150th.
3.31%
Ranked 141st. 12 times more than Japan

Overall productivity > PPP $50,593.7
Ranked 22nd.
$89,722.3
Ranked 1st. 77% more than Japan
GDP deflator 92.88
Ranked 169th.
113.36
Ranked 141st. 22% more than Japan

Patents granted 994 per million people
Ranked 1st. 5 times more than Luxembourg
202 per million people
Ranked 7th.
Budget > Expenditures per capita $16,947.76
Ranked 17th.
$43,613.51
Ranked 1st. 3 times more than Japan

Trade balance with US $-16,366,600,000
Ranked 223th. 3410 times more than Luxembourg
$-4,800,000
Ranked 126th.
GDP > CIA Factbook $3.58 trillion
Ranked 3rd. 143 times more than Luxembourg
$25.01 billion
Ranked 95th.

Macroeconomic environment index 4.67
Ranked 29th.
5.23
Ranked 6th. 12% more than Japan
Growth competitiveness score 5.48
Ranked 9th. 11% more than Luxembourg
4.95
Ranked 26th.
Public institution index 5.88
Ranked 16th.
5.99
Ranked 15th. 2% more than Japan
GDP in 1970 $206.8
Ranked 2nd. 159 times more than Luxembourg
$1.3
Ranked 25th.
GDP > Current LCU 499733600000000 29324500000
New business creation rate 4.36
Ranked 66th.
11.71
Ranked 17th. 3 times more than Japan

Saving rate 23.57
Ranked 28th. 27% more than Luxembourg
18.5
Ranked 57th.

New businesses registered > Number 145,151
Ranked 5th. 58 times more than Luxembourg
2,505
Ranked 68th.

Steel > Production 87.5 million tonnes
Ranked 3rd. 40 times more than Luxembourg
2.2 million tonnes
Ranked 39th.

Household spending per capita 22,172.86
Ranked 2nd. 10% more than Luxembourg
20,235.55
Ranked 4th.

Government spending 912.39 billion
Ranked 3rd. 213 times more than Luxembourg
4.28 billion
Ranked 49th.

Economic growth > Per capita -5.12
Ranked 133th.
-5.84
Ranked 140th. 14% more than Japan

World trade > Exports 636.14 billion
Ranked 5th. 7 times more than Luxembourg
88.59 billion
Ranked 31st.

Budget > Expenditures > Capital $71 billion
Ranked 2nd. 73 times more than Luxembourg
$975.5 million
Ranked 32nd.

Inequality > GINI index 24.85
Ranked 30th.
30.76
Ranked 31st. 24% more than Japan
Currency yen euro
Gross domestic savings 1.05 trillion
Ranked 4th. 40 times more than Luxembourg
26.03 billion
Ranked 44th.

Lending interest rate 1.68%
Ranked 140th.
5.27%
Ranked 145th. 3 times more than Japan

Investment > Gross fixed 21.1% of GDP
Ranked 81st.
21.3% of GDP
Ranked 79th. 1% more than Japan

Exchange rates > Recent years yen per US dollar - 110.22 (2005), 108.19 (2004), 115.93 (2003), 125.39 (2002), 121.53 (2001) euros per US dollar - 0.8041 (2005), 0.8054 (2004), 0.886 (2003), 1.0626 (2002), 1.1175 (2001)
Household spending 2.83 trillion
Ranked 3rd. 281 times more than Luxembourg
10.07 billion
Ranked 64th.

Tourism receipts > International $15.55 billion
Ranked 12th. 4 times more than Luxembourg
$3.88 billion
Ranked 40th.

GDP after tax 4.86 trillion
Ranked 3rd. 103 times more than Luxembourg
47.28 billion
Ranked 48th.

World Bank exchange rate 93.57
Ranked 50th. 130 times more than Luxembourg
0.72
Ranked 159th.

Listed domestic companies 3,279
Ranked 6th. 84 times more than Luxembourg
39
Ranked 80th.

Stocks traded > Turnover ratio 118.78%
Ranked 13th. 253 times more than Luxembourg
0.47%
Ranked 103th.

Government expenditure 1 trillion
Ranked 3rd. 113 times more than Luxembourg
8.82 billion
Ranked 52nd.

Tourist departures 15.99 million
Ranked 11th. 61 times more than Luxembourg
261,000
Ranked 70th.

GDP > Constant LCU 538052500000000 25867700000
Male to female earnings 39%
Ranked 2nd. 2 times more than Luxembourg
16%
Ranked 20th.
GNI 5.23 trillion
Ranked 3rd. 141 times more than Luxembourg
37.18 billion
Ranked 70th.

Tourism expenditures > International $48.17 billion
Ranked 4th. 14 times more than Luxembourg
$3.37 billion
Ranked 32nd.

Currency code JPY EUR
Patent applications > Nonresidents 72,661
Ranked 2nd. 1135 times more than Luxembourg
64
Ranked 33th.

Ease of doing business 19
Ranked 155th.
42
Ranked 134th. 2 times more than Japan
Patent applications > Residents 330,110
Ranked 1st. 6877 times more than Luxembourg
48
Ranked 51st.

Policy competitiveness 43.69%
Ranked 31st.
80.2%
Ranked 5th. 84% more than Japan
Exchange rates to USD 117.99 0.7345
Net taxes 22.59 billion
Ranked 30th. 5 times more than Luxembourg
5.01 billion
Ranked 46th.

Gross savings 1.19 trillion
Ranked 3rd. 123 times more than Luxembourg
9.68 billion
Ranked 54th.

Industry > Value added 31.82 (2000) 21.08 (2000)
GNI > Current LCU 511582600000000 23271900000
Services output 3.47 trillion
Ranked 3rd. 173 times more than Luxembourg
20.02 billion
Ranked 43th.

Services growth 2.61
Ranked 129th.
-3.3
Ranked 105th.

Total businesses registered > Number 2.57 million
Ranked 5th. 120 times more than Luxembourg
21,385
Ranked 64th.

Development assistance to LDCs 15%
Ranked 20th.
32%
Ranked 5th. 2 times more than Japan
Interest payments > Current LCU 13081000000000 27470370
Trade > With US > US > Exports of meat > Poultry > Etc per 1000 8.39
Ranked 25th.
0.0
Ranked 167th.
Trade > Imports > Goods and services > Current US$ 523.7 billion$
Ranked 6th. 11 times more than Luxembourg
49.52 billion$
Ranked 36th.

Trade > With US > US > Exports of measuring > Testing > Control instruments per 1000 12.29
Ranked 21st. 2 times more than Luxembourg
5.54
Ranked 43th.
Gross domestic savings > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 246.05$ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 51st.
437.27$ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 9th. 78% more than Japan

Cash surplus/deficit > % of GDP -1.19%
Ranked 19th.
-1.61%
Ranked 45th. 35% more than Japan

Trade > With US > US > Exports of materials handling equipment per 1000 1.51
Ranked 58th.
1.74
Ranked 55th. 15% more than Japan
Expense > % of GDP 14.62%
Ranked 39th.
38.39%
Ranked 15th. 3 times more than Japan

Trade > With US > US > Exports of marine engines > Parts per million 246.17
Ranked 49th.
0.0
Ranked 166th.
Tourist arrivals by region of origin > Total 6.73 million
Ranked 28th. 7 times more than Luxembourg
912,641
Ranked 83th.

Stocks traded > Total value > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 1,102.22$ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 15th. 167 times more than Luxembourg
6.59$ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 78th.

Tax > Taxes on income > Profits and capital gains > % of revenue 35.02%
Ranked 11th. 22% more than Luxembourg
28.6%
Ranked 19th.

Inflation > GDP deflator > Annual % -1.81%
Ranked 170th.
4.18%
Ranked 103th.

Services > Etc. > Value added > Annual % growth 2.17%
Ranked 126th.
5.85%
Ranked 63th. 3 times more than Japan

Net income from abroad > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 23.71$ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 16th.
-139.852$ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 169th.

Portfolio investment > Excluding LCFAR > BoP > Current US$ -379,525,700,000 BoP $
Ranked 115th.
-583,202,800,000 BoP $
Ranked 119th. 54% more than Japan

Gross capital formation > Current US$ 1.04 trillion$
Ranked 2nd. 133 times more than Luxembourg
7.81 billion$
Ranked 58th.

Trade > With US > US > Exports of glass-plate > Sheet > Etc per million 1,055.39
Ranked 16th. 2% more than Luxembourg
1,030.35
Ranked 17th.
Changes in net > Reserves > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 45.93 BoP $ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 6th. 35 times more than Luxembourg
1.32 BoP $ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 30th.

Gross value added at factor cost > Constant 2000 US$ 4.86 trillion constant 2000 US$
Ranked 1st. 227 times more than Luxembourg
21.4 billion constant 2000 US$
Ranked 48th.

Trade > With US > US > Exports of rugs per million 252.68
Ranked 33th. 13 times more than Luxembourg
19.65
Ranked 84th.
GNI > Atlas method > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 1.1$ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 11th. 40% more than Luxembourg
0.783$ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 165th.

Trade > With US > US > Exports of logs and lumber per 1000 5.05
Ranked 25th.
0.0
Ranked 152nd.
GNI > Atlas method > Current US$ 4.98 trillion$
Ranked 2nd. 189 times more than Luxembourg
26.31 billion$
Ranked 65th.

Trade > Exports > Goods and services > Current US$ 612.67 billion$
Ranked 4th. 11 times more than Luxembourg
57.65 billion$
Ranked 32nd.

Gross capital formation > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 0.227$ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 77th. 6% more than Luxembourg
0.214$ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 82nd.

Gross national expenditure > Current US$ 4.5 trillion$
Ranked 2nd. 159 times more than Luxembourg
28.34 billion$
Ranked 63th.

Income payments > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 8.3 BoP $ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 125th.
2,165.42 BoP $ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 1st. 261 times more than Japan

Interest payments > % of expense 20.48%
Ranked 13th. 85 times more than Luxembourg
0.24%
Ranked 73th.

Net errors and omissions > Adjusted > BoP > Current US$ -15,898,310,000 BoP $
Ranked 136th. 45 times more than Luxembourg
-351,942,200 BoP $
Ranked 101st.

Revenue > Excluding grants > % of GDP 20.72%
Ranked 35th.
38.55%
Ranked 15th. 86% more than Japan

Trade > With US > US > Exports of semiconductors per 1000 18.53
Ranked 14th. 5 times more than Luxembourg
3.91
Ranked 35th.
Trade > With US > US > Exports of shingles > Molding > Wallboard per 1000 0.893
Ranked 47th.
3.66
Ranked 15th. 4 times more than Japan
Service > Exports > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita 862.54 BoP $ per capita
Ranked 57th.
88,923.74 BoP $ per capita
Ranked 1st. 103 times more than Japan

Trade > With US > US > Exports of spacecraft > Excluding military per million 59.6
Ranked 8th.
0.0
Ranked 50th.
Subsidies and other transfers > % of expense 64.76%
Ranked 1st.
66.6%
Ranked 10th. 3% more than Japan

Trade > Exports > Goods and services > Annual % growth 13.89%
Ranked 40th. 57% more than Luxembourg
8.86%
Ranked 43th.

Trade > Exports > Goods and services > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 0.149 BoP $ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 125th.
1.51 BoP $ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 3rd. 10 times more than Japan

External balance on goods and services > Current US$ 88.97 billion$
Ranked 2nd. 11 times more than Luxembourg
8.13 billion$
Ranked 27th.

Final > Consumption expenditure > Etc. > % of GDP 75.39%
Ranked 109th. 34% more than Luxembourg
56.27%
Ranked 134th.

Final > Consumption expenditure > Etc. > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 0.754$ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 110th. 34% more than Luxembourg
0.563$ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 135th.

GDP > PPP > Current international $ 4 trillion PPP $
Ranked 3rd. 145 times more than Luxembourg
27.51 billion PPP $
Ranked 90th.

Trade > With US > US > Exports of sports apparel and gear per million 255.66
Ranked 41st. 10 times more than Luxembourg
26.2
Ranked 88th.
Trade > With US > US > Exports of steelmaking materials per 1000 0.598
Ranked 29th. 55 times more than Luxembourg
0.0109
Ranked 75th.
Household final > Consumption expenditure > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 0.574$ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 117th. 45% more than Luxembourg
0.397$ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 132nd.

Income share held by lowest 20% 10.58%
Ranked 2nd. 26% more than Luxembourg
8.43%
Ranked 12th.
Trade > With US > US > Exports of manmade cloth per 1000 0.892
Ranked 40th.
28.22
Ranked 3rd. 32 times more than Japan
Trade > With US > US > Exports of hides and skins per million 771.78
Ranked 9th. 6 times more than Luxembourg
139.71
Ranked 22nd.
Trade > With US > US > Exports of finished metal shapes per 1000 2.54
Ranked 52nd.
25.77
Ranked 13th. 10 times more than Japan
Foreign direct investment > Net > BoP > Current US$ -42,224,390,000 BoP $
Ranked 134th. 6 times more than Luxembourg
-7,301,060,000 BoP $
Ranked 127th.

Currency > Real effective exchange rate index 79.39%
Ranked 85th.
107.08%
Ranked 44th. 35% more than Japan

External balance on goods and services > % of GDP 1.94%
Ranked 53th.
22.3%
Ranked 10th. 11 times more than Japan

Foreign direct investment > Net > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP -9.313 BoP $ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 114th.
-200.201 BoP $ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 128th. 21 times more than Japan

Domestic credit provided by banking sector > % of GDP 318.67%
Ranked 1st. 2 times more than Luxembourg
131.6%
Ranked 24th.

Royalty and license fees > Payments > BoP > Current US$ 14.65 billion BoP $
Ranked 3rd. 112 times more than Luxembourg
130.3 million BoP $
Ranked 42nd.

Trade > With US > US > Exports of generators > Accessories per 1000 1.39
Ranked 66th. 5 times more than Luxembourg
0.282
Ranked 95th.
Commercial service imports > Current US$ 132.6 billion$
Ranked 4th. 5 times more than Luxembourg
24.82 billion$
Ranked 25th.

Trade > Imports of goods > Services and income > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 0.142 BoP $ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 130th.
3.36 BoP $ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 1st. 24 times more than Japan

Trade > With US > US > Exports of railway transportation equipment per million 223.89
Ranked 48th. 3 times more than Luxembourg
72.04
Ranked 74th.
Trade > With US > US > Exports of pleasure boats and motors per 1000 0.432
Ranked 55th. 4 times more than Luxembourg
0.118
Ranked 80th.
Service imports > BoP > Current US$ 134.26 billion BoP $
Ranked 4th. 5 times more than Luxembourg
24.85 billion BoP $
Ranked 25th.

Trade > Imports > Goods and services > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 0.134 BoP $ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 129th.
1.19 BoP $ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 4th. 9 times more than Japan

Royalty and license fees > Receipts > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 3,894 BoP $ per $1 million of
Ranked 13th.
7,862.06 BoP $ per $1 million of
Ranked 5th. 2 times more than Japan

Trade > With US > US > Exports of fruits > Frozen juices per 1000 4.74
Ranked 18th. 29 times more than Luxembourg
0.166
Ranked 76th.
Trade > With US > US > Exports of precious metals > Other per million 2,272.31
Ranked 10th.
0.0
Ranked 107th.
Final > Consumption expenditure > Etc. > Current US$ 3.46 trillion$
Ranked 2nd. 168 times more than Luxembourg
20.52 billion$
Ranked 67th.

Trade > With US > US > Exports of plastic materials per 1000 7.3
Ranked 29th. 3 times more than Luxembourg
2.5
Ranked 58th.
GDP > PPP > Constant 2000 international $ 3.55 trillion PPP 2000 $
Ranked 3rd. 145 times more than Luxembourg
24.47 billion PPP 2000 $
Ranked 90th.

Trade > With US > US > Exports of excavating machinery per 1000 0.686
Ranked 77th.
3.63
Ranked 33th. 5 times more than Japan
Net capital account > BoP > Current US$ -3,520,968,000 BoP $
Ranked 113th.
2.79 billion BoP $
Ranked 6th.

Final > Consumption expenditure > Constant 2000 US$ 3.62 trillion constant 2000 US$
Ranked 2nd. 269 times more than Luxembourg
13.46 billion constant 2000 US$
Ranked 49th.

Current account balance > % of GDP 3.66%
Ranked 25th.
11.7%
Ranked 15th. 3 times more than Japan

Micro > Small and medium enterprises > Number 5.71 million
Ranked 2nd. 235 times more than Luxembourg
24,334
Ranked 25th.
Household final > Consumption expenditure > Etc. > Current US$ 2.63 trillion$
Ranked 2nd. 182 times more than Luxembourg
14.48 billion$
Ranked 68th.

Gross value added at factor cost > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 0.998$ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 11th. 12% more than Luxembourg
0.894$ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 84th.

Gross private capital flows > % of GDP 15.91%
Ranked 64th.
3,295.2%
Ranked 1st. 207 times more than Japan

Micro > Small and medium enterprises > Per 1,000 people 44.71 per 1,000 people
Ranked 10th.
53.68 per 1,000 people
Ranked 8th. 20% more than Japan
Central government debt > Total > % of GDP 44.19%
Ranked 22nd. 11 times more than Luxembourg
3.96%
Ranked 38th.

Trade > With US > US > Exports of photo > Service industry machinery per 1000 2.21
Ranked 57th.
16.42
Ranked 13th. 7 times more than Japan
Goods > Exports > BoP > Current US$ 567.57 billion BoP $
Ranked 4th. 39 times more than Luxembourg
14.37 billion BoP $
Ranked 58th.

Household final > Consumption expenditure > Annual % growth 1.93%
Ranked 112th.
2.32%
Ranked 89th. 20% more than Japan

GNI > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 1.02$ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 16th. 19% more than Luxembourg
0.86$ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 171st.

Gross fixed capital formation > Annual % growth 1.13%
Ranked 105th.
2.21%
Ranked 89th. 96% more than Japan

Trade > With US > US > Exports of fuel oil per 1000 0.115
Ranked 44th.
0.0
Ranked 105th.
Foreign direct investment > Net inflows > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 0.709 BoP $ per $1 million of
Ranked 149th.
3,013.21 BoP $ per $1 million of
Ranked 1st. 4250 times more than Japan

Foreign direct investment > Net inflows > % of GDP 0.07%
Ranked 149th.
301.32%
Ranked 1st. 4305 times more than Japan

Current account balance > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 36.56 BoP $ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 25th.
117 BoP $ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 15th. 3 times more than Japan

Commercial service > Exports > Current US$ 107.88 billion$
Ranked 5th. 3 times more than Luxembourg
40.28 billion$
Ranked 21st.

Current account balance > BoP > Current US$ 165.78 billion BoP $
Ranked 1st. 39 times more than Luxembourg
4.27 billion BoP $
Ranked 26th.

Trade > With US > US > Exports of food > Tobacco machinery per 1000 1.1
Ranked 39th. 7 times more than Luxembourg
0.164
Ranked 90th.
Bank liquid > Reserves to bank assets ratio 4.09
Ranked 127th. 2 times more than Luxembourg
1.99
Ranked 144th.

Trade > Imports of goods > Services and income > BoP > Current US$ 645.49 billion BoP $
Ranked 6th. 5 times more than Luxembourg
122.43 billion BoP $
Ranked 28th.

GDP per capita > PPP > Current international $ 31,266.74 PPP $
Ranked 18th.
60,228.41 PPP $
Ranked 1st. 93% more than Japan

Bank nonperfoming loans to total gross loans 1.8%
Ranked 62nd. 9 times more than Luxembourg
0.2%
Ranked 86th.

Trade > With US > US > Exports of parts-civilian aircraft per 1000 8.5
Ranked 27th.
32.22
Ranked 6th. 4 times more than Japan
Trade > With US > US > Exports of leather and furs per million 105.67
Ranked 20th.
0.0
Ranked 111th.
Trade > With US > US > Exports of other industrial supplies per 1000 4.7
Ranked 38th.
110.84
Ranked 2nd. 24 times more than Japan
Trade > With US > US > Exports of other household goods per 1000 7.52
Ranked 35th.
13.75
Ranked 23th. 83% more than Japan
Trade > With US > US > Exports of laboratory testing instruments per 1000 6.88
Ranked 13th. 15 times more than Luxembourg
0.465
Ranked 66th.
Trade > % of GDP 24.79%
Ranked 167th.
293.87%
Ranked 3rd. 12 times more than Japan

Trade > With US > US > Exports of other foods per 1000 4.24
Ranked 36th. 5 times more than Luxembourg
0.936
Ranked 68th.
Tax > Components of taxation > Social security > Contribution by employer 17.6%
Ranked 11th. 42% more than Luxembourg
12.4%
Ranked 16th.
Tourist arrivals by region of origin > Americas 1.03 million
Ranked 25th. 32 times more than Luxembourg
32,247
Ranked 110th.

Gross capital formation > Current US$ > Per capita 8,133.38$ per capita
Ranked 9th.
17,108.72$ per capita
Ranked 2nd. 2 times more than Japan

Trade > With US > US > Exports of jewelry > Etc per 1000 3.19
Ranked 28th. 7 times more than Luxembourg
0.439
Ranked 55th.
GDP per capita growth > Annual % 2.59%
Ranked 96th.
3.26%
Ranked 84th. 26% more than Japan

Gross fixed capital formation > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 0.229$ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 64th. 13% more than Luxembourg
0.203$ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 87th.

Service > Exports > BoP > Current US$ 110.21 billion BoP $
Ranked 5th. 3 times more than Luxembourg
40.61 billion BoP $
Ranked 20th.

Net trade in goods > BoP > Current US$ 93.96 billion BoP $
Ranked 5th.
-4,231,035,000 BoP $
Ranked 115th.

Trade > With US > US > Exports of industrial rubber products per million 429.4
Ranked 44th.
4,946.57
Ranked 5th. 12 times more than Japan
GDP > Constant 2000 US$ 4.99 trillion constant 2000 US$
Ranked 2nd. 209 times more than Luxembourg
23.83 billion constant 2000 US$
Ranked 62nd.

Merchandise > Exports > Current US$ 594.9 billion$
Ranked 4th. 32 times more than Luxembourg
18.39 billion$
Ranked 60th.

International tourism > Expenditures > Current US$ 48.1 billion$
Ranked 4th. 16 times more than Luxembourg
2.95 billion$
Ranked 34th.

Net income > BoP > Current US$ 103.44 billion BoP $
Ranked 1st.
-6,336,036,000 BoP $
Ranked 122nd.

GDP > Purchasing power parity > Per capita $33,523.37 per capita
Ranked 25th.
$81,278.63 per capita
Ranked 1st. 2 times more than Japan

GDP > Per capita $33,523.37 per capita
Ranked 25th.
$81,278.63 per capita
Ranked 1st. 2 times more than Japan

GDP > Official exchange rate > Per capita $34,402.26 per capita
Ranked 24th.
$104,421.43 per capita
Ranked 1st. 3 times more than Japan

Household final > Consumption expenditure > Constant 2000 US$ 2.76 trillion constant 2000 US$
Ranked 2nd. 284 times more than Luxembourg
9.72 billion constant 2000 US$
Ranked 66th.

Market capitalization of listed companies > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 1,044.67$ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 25th.
1,405.44$ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 12th. 35% more than Japan

Trade > Exports of goods > Services and income > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 0.181 BoP $ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 118th.
3.5 BoP $ per $1 of GDP
Ranked 1st. 19 times more than Japan

Trade > With US > US imports of engines for civilian aircraft per 1000 4.85
Ranked 11th. 79 times more than Luxembourg
0.0611
Ranked 38th.
GDP > CIA Factbook > Per capita $28,045.72 per capita
Ranked 15th.
$55,584.32 per capita
Ranked 1st. 98% more than Japan

GDP > Constant 2000 US$ > Per capita 39,075.31 constant 2000 US$ per c
Ranked 3rd.
52,182.92 constant 2000 US$ per c
Ranked 1st. 34% more than Japan

GDP > PPP > Constant 2000 international $ > Per capita 27,816.66 PPP 2000 $ per capita
Ranked 18th.
53,582.68 PPP 2000 $ per capita
Ranked 1st. 93% more than Japan

GDP > PPP > Current international $ > Per capita 31,266.74 PPP $ per capita
Ranked 18th.
60,228.48 PPP $ per capita
Ranked 1st. 93% more than Japan

GNI > Current US$ > Per capita 36,325.61$ per capita
Ranked 12th.
63,743.85$ per capita
Ranked 1st. 75% more than Japan

GNI > Atlas method > Current US$ > Per capita 38,947.39$ per capita
Ranked 9th.
58,052.07$ per capita
Ranked 1st. 49% more than Japan

GNI > PPP > Current international $ > Per capita 32,010 PPP $ per capita
Ranked 15th.
48,700.08 PPP $ per capita
Ranked 1st. 52% more than Japan

Goods > Exports > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita 4,441.99 BoP $ per capita
Ranked 38th.
31,466.76 BoP $ per capita
Ranked 4th. 7 times more than Japan

Grants and other revenue > % of revenue 18.16%
Ranked 36th. 3 times more than Luxembourg
6.26%
Ranked 58th.

Current transfers > Receipts > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 2.15 BoP $ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 122nd.
141.07 BoP $ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 24th. 66 times more than Japan

Trade > With US > US imports of engines and engine parts per 1000 31.23
Ranked 4th. 138 times more than Luxembourg
0.227
Ranked 43th.
Gross domestic savings > Current US$ > Per capita 8,829.76$ per capita
Ranked 13th.