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India

India Agriculture Stats

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Author: jaacosta47

An economist from Mumbai is calling on the government of India to implement economic reforms which will also focus on agriculture. Rural poverty is a principal problem in India with majority of the population living in rural areas. The disproportion between urban and rural incomes is also going up. The National Agro Foundation (NAF) has done a lot to address this issue. For more than 20 years, this foundation has been involved in interventions such as efficient farm and water management, introduction of technology in agriculture, soil improvement, rural sanitation, and upgraded cattle development. All these are meant to address farm productivity problems in India.

Indeed, India has made significant strides in agriculture. It used to be highly dependent on food grain requirements but now the country has emerged as an exporter of food grain commodities and commercial produce. This farming saga can be classified generally into three important periods. The first was the Post-Independence period which was five decades ago when there was severe food supply scarcity and India depended too much on United States agricultural programs and support. This was followed by the Green Revolution to attain food sufficiency. It was the period where there was conspicuous concentration on the unveiling of technologies and policies to make possible self sufficiency in grain production. The course of action of the ruling United Progressive Alliance was to enhance agricultural inputs by using quality seedlings, fertilizers and pesticides. In fact, a strategy was devised to improve infrastructure for the production and distribution of high quality seeds to farmers at reasonable prices. This has generated good results with 32.8 million tons of certified quality seeds available in the market.

Even as agriculture contributes merely 21 percent to the GDP of India, it still remains an important industry since more than 70 percent of the populace (1.1 billion) are poor and live on agriculture.

Definitions

  • Agricultural growth: Index of agricultural production in 1996 - 98 (1989 - 91 = 100)
  • Agricultural land > Sq. km: Agricultural land (sq. km). Agricultural land refers to the share of land area that is arable, under permanent crops, and under permanent pastures. Arable land includes land defined by the FAO as land under temporary crops (double-cropped areas are counted once), temporary meadows for mowing or for pasture, land under market or kitchen gardens, and land temporarily fallow. Land abandoned as a result of shifting cultivation is excluded. Land under permanent crops is land cultivated with crops that occupy the land for long periods and need not be replanted after each harvest, such as cocoa, coffee, and rubber. This category includes land under flowering shrubs, fruit trees, nut trees, and vines, but excludes land under trees grown for wood or timber. Permanent pasture is land used for five or more years for forage, including natural and cultivated crops.
  • Agricultural land > Sq. km per 1000: Agricultural land (sq. km). Agricultural land refers to the share of land area that is arable, under permanent crops, and under permanent pastures. Arable land includes land defined by the FAO as land under temporary crops (double-cropped areas are counted once), temporary meadows for mowing or for pasture, land under market or kitchen gardens, and land temporarily fallow. Land abandoned as a result of shifting cultivation is excluded. Land under permanent crops is land cultivated with crops that occupy the land for long periods and need not be replanted after each harvest, such as cocoa, coffee, and rubber. This category includes land under flowering shrubs, fruit trees, nut trees, and vines, but excludes land under trees grown for wood or timber. Permanent pasture is land used for five or more years for forage, including natural and cultivated crops. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Agriculture, value added > Current US$: Agriculture, value added (current US$), including forestry, hunting, and fishing, as well as cultivation of crops and livestock production. Value added is the net output of a sector after adding up all outputs and subtracting intermediate inputs. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or depletion and degradation of natural resources.
  • Arable land > Hectares: Arable land (in hectares) includes land defined by the FAO as land under temporary crops (double-cropped areas are counted once), temporary meadows for mowing or for pasture, land under market or kitchen gardens, and land temporarily fallow. Land abandoned as a result of shifting cultivation is excluded.
  • Arable land > Hectares per capita: Arable land (hectares per person). Arable land (hectares per person) includes land defined by the FAO as land under temporary crops (double-cropped areas are counted once), temporary meadows for mowing or for pasture, land under market or kitchen gardens, and land temporarily fallow. Land abandoned as a result of shifting cultivation is excluded.
  • Cereal yield > Kg per hectare: Cereal yield, measured as kilograms per hectare of harvested land, includes wheat, rice, maize, barley, oats, rye, millet, sorghum, buckwheat, and mixed grains. Production data on cereals relate to crops harvested for dry grain only. Cereal crops harvested for hay or harvested green for food, feed, or silage and those used for grazing are excluded."
  • Crops > Beans > Coffee > Coffee production: Coffee production of each exporting country (in kg).
  • Farm workers: Agricultural employment shows the number of agricultural workers in the agricultural sector.
  • Gross value added: Gross Value Added by agriculture, hunting, forestry, fishing at current prices - US dollars.
  • Produce > Banana > Production: Metric tons of Bananas produced in 2000.
  • Produce > Cereal > Cereal production > Metric tons: Cereal production (metric tons). Production data on cereals relate to crops harvested for dry grain only. Cereal crops harvested for hay or harvested green for food or silage, and those used for grazing, are excluded.
  • Produce > Food > Production index: Food production index covers food crops that are considered edible and that contain nutrients. Coffee and tea are excluded because, although edible, they have no nutritive value.
  • Products: Major agricultural crops and products
  • Value: Agriculture corresponds to ISIC divisions 1-5 and includes forestry, hunting, and fishing, as well as cultivation of crops and livestock production. Value added is the net output of a sector after adding up all outputs and subtracting intermediate inputs. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or depletion and degradation of natural resources. The origin of value added is determined by the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 3. Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars."
STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Agricultural growth 121 2007 53th out of 204
Agricultural land > Sq. km 1.8 million sq. km 2011 8th out of 206
Agricultural land > Sq. km per 1000 1.47 sq. km 2011 164th out of 206
Agriculture, value added > Current US$ $302.31 billion 2012 2nd out of 112
Arable land > Hectares 159.65 million hectares 2005 2nd out of 75
Arable land > Hectares per capita 0.129 2011 104th out of 204
Cereal yield > Kg per hectare 2,647.2 2008 84th out of 168
Crops > Beans > Coffee > Coffee production 300.3 million kg 2014 6th out of 51
Farm workers 261.63 million 2008 2nd out of 194
Gross value added 307.81 billion 2012 2nd out of 205
Produce > Banana > Production 11 million metric tonnes 2000 1st out of 48
Produce > Cereal > Cereal production > Metric tons 286.5 million 2012 3rd out of 180
Produce > Food > Production index 104.7% 2004 100th out of 181
Products rice, wheat, oilseed, cotton, jute, tea, sugarcane, lentils, onions, potatoes; dairy products, sheep, goats, poultry; fish 2010
Value 124.02 billion 2009 3rd out of 119

SOURCES: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 2001; Food and Agriculture Organization; Food and Agriculture Organization. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; World Bank national accounts data

United Nations Statistics Division
; World Development Indicators database; Food and Agriculture Organization; Food and Agriculture Organisation, electronic files and web site.; Wikipedia: List of countries by coffee production (Countries); Food and Agriculture Organisation, Production Yearbook and data files.; United Nations Statistics Division; Agri-Food Business Development Centre; All CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 25 March 2010.; World Bank national accounts data, and OECD National Accounts data files.

Citation

"India Agriculture Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/India/Agriculture

NationMaster

Did you know

India ranked first for farm workers amongst Hot countries in 2008.
India has had the highest produce > cereal > land under cereal production > hectares since 1967.
India has had the highest produce > land under cereal > production > hectares since 1967.
India has had the highest produce > land used for cereal > production > hectares since 1967.

4

An economist from Mumbai is calling on the government of India to implement economic reforms which will also focus on agriculture. Rural poverty is a principal problem in India with majority of the population living in rural areas. The disproportion between urban and rural incomes is also going up. The National Agro Foundation (NAF) has done a lot to address this issue. For more than 20 years, this foundation has been involved in interventions such as efficient farm and water management, introduction of technology in agriculture, soil improvement, rural sanitation, and upgraded cattle development. All these are meant to address farm productivity problems in India.

Indeed, India has made significant strides in agriculture. It used to be highly dependent on food grain requirements but now the country has emerged as an exporter of food grain commodities and commercial produce. This farming saga can be classified generally into three important periods. The first was the Post-Independence period which was five decades ago when there was severe food supply scarcity and India depended too much on United States agricultural programs and support. This was followed by the Green Revolution to attain food sufficiency. It was the period where there was conspicuous concentration on the unveiling of technologies and policies to make possible self sufficiency in grain production. The course of action of the ruling United Progressive Alliance was to enhance agricultural inputs by using quality seedlings, fertilizers and pesticides. In fact, a strategy was devised to improve infrastructure for the production and distribution of high quality seeds to farmers at reasonable prices. This has generated good results with 32.8 million tons of certified quality seeds available in the market.

Even as agriculture contributes merely 21 percent to the GDP of India, it still remains an important industry since more than 70 percent of the populace (1.1 billion) are poor and live on agriculture.

Posted on 15 May 2014

jaacosta47

jaacosta47

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