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Health > Access to sanitation: Countries Compared

Luke.Metcalfe

Author: Luke.Metcalfe

This measure is defined as the proportion of the population with access to improved sanitation facilities. These facilities prevent contact with human excrement and prevent the spread of infectious diseases. Improved sanitation facilities include: piped sewer systems (flush or pour-flush), septic tanks or pit latrines; ventilated improved pit latrines; pit latrines with slabs; and composting toilets.

Access to improved sanitation facilities is vital in preventing morbidity and mortality from water borne diseases. It is estimated that 1.6 million people die from diarrheal diseases annually due to lack of basic sanitation, most of them children under 5 years old. Other diseases related to poor sanitation include schistosomiasis with 160 million infected, intestinal helminthes with 133 million infected and hepatitis A with 1.5 million new cases per year. Infection with trachoma is also related to poor hygiene, and is the leading cause of preventable blindness in the world.

Between 1990 and 2011, the percentage of people with no access to improved sanitation facilities has decreased from 85% to 75%. However, up to 40% of the world’s population still has no access to improved sanitation facilities. The lowest rates are in sub-Saharan Africa, Southern Asia and Eastern Asia, at 37%, 38% and 45%, respectively. Low income populations living in rural areas have the lowest coverage rates.

The problem of inadequate sanitation poses an economic burden to affected countries due to the medical cost of hygiene related diseases and loss of income and productivity in those affected. The investment in improving sanitation can generate up to nine times its cost in economic benefits. The improvement in life expectancy at birth by 10 years can increase a country’s economic growth by 0.3 to 0.4% annually.

Citations:

1) World Health Organization. World Health Statistics 2013. http://www.who.int/gho/publications/worldhealthstatistics/ENWHS2013Full.pdf

2) World Health Organization. Water and sanitation health: health through safe drinking water and basic sanitation. http://www.who.int/watersanitationhealth/mdg1/en/

3) World Health Organization. 10 things you need to know about sanitation. http://www.unwater.org/downloads/media/sanitation/10Things.pdf

DEFINITION: The percentage of the total population with access to sanitation facilities.

CONTENTS

# COUNTRY AMOUNT DATE GRAPH
=1 Canada 100% 2003
=1 Netherlands 100% 2003
=1 Turkey 100% 2003
=1 Slovakia 100% 2003
=1 Finland 100% 2003
=1 Barbados 100% 2003
=1 Australia 100% 2003
=1 Morocco 100% 2003
=1 Maldives 100% 2003
=1 Mexico 100% 2003
=1 United Kingdom 100% 2003
=1 Lithuania 100% 2003
=1 Saint Lucia 100% 2003
=1 Cyprus 100% 2003
=1 Armenia 100% 2003
=1 United States 100% 2003
=1 Sweden 100% 2003
=1 Austria 100% 2003
=1 Switzerland 100% 2003
=1 Malta 100% 2003
=1 Singapore 100% 2003
=22 Dominica 99% 2003
=22 Thailand 99% 2003
=22 Georgia 99% 2003
=22 Fiji 99% 2003
=22 Hungary 99% 2003
=22 Saudi Arabia 99% 2003
=22 Cuba 99% 2003
=22 Iran 99% 2003
=22 Kazakhstan 99% 2003
=31 Papua New Guinea 98% 2003
=31 The Bahamas 98% 2003
=31 Gabon 98% 2003
=34 Panama 97% 2003
=34 Tunisia 97% 2003
=36 Jamaica 96% 2003
=36 Romania 96% 2003
=36 Chile 96% 2003
=36 Croatia 96% 2003
40 Trinidad and Tobago 95% 2003
=41 Ecuador 94% 2003
=41 Peru 94% 2003
=41 Uruguay 94% 2003
=44 Costa Rica 93% 2003
=44 Ukraine 93% 2003
=46 El Salvador 92% 2003
=46 Suriname 92% 2003
=46 Bulgaria 92% 2003
=49 The Gambia 91% 2003
=49 Grenada 91% 2003
=51 Dominican Republic 90% 2003
=51 Rwanda 90% 2003
=51 South Africa 90% 2003
=54 Venezuela 89% 2003
=54 Sri Lanka 89% 2003
56 Ethiopia 88% 2003
=57 Jordan 87% 2003
=57 Pakistan 87% 2003
=57 Vietnam 87% 2003
=60 Mauritius 86% 2003
=60 Albania 86% 2003
62 Guatemala 85% 2003
63 Azerbaijan 84% 2003
=64 Bosnia and Herzegovina 83% 2003
=64 Lebanon 83% 2003
=64 China 83% 2003
Former Soviet republics average (profile) 82.67% 2003
=67 Cambodia 82% 2003
=67 Cape Verde 82% 2003
=69 Turkmenistan 81% 2003
=69 Mongolia 81% 2003
Former Spanish colonies average (profile) 79.35% 2003
=71 Zimbabwe 79% 2003
=71 Democratic Republic of the Congo 79% 2003
73 Cote d'Ivoire 78% 2003
74 Russia 76% 2003
75 Tajikistan 75% 2003
76 Belarus 74% 2003
South and Central Asia average (profile) 72.67% 2003
77 India 72% 2003
=78 Uzbekistan 71% 2003
=78 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 71% 2003
=80 Indonesia 70% 2003
=80 Mauritania 70% 2003
=80 Comoros 70% 2003
83 Mozambique 69% 2003
=84 Belize 68% 2003
=84 Namibia 68% 2003
86 Guyana 67% 2003
=87 Burkina Faso 66% 2003
=87 Solomon Islands 66% 2003
89 Ghana 64% 2003
South Asia average (profile) 63.75% 2003
90 South Korea 63% 2003
=91 Cameroon 62% 2003
=91 Nepal 62% 2003
=91 Bhutan 62% 2003
94 Eritrea 58% 2003
=95 Paraguay 56% 2003
=95 Angola 56% 2003
Former French colonies average (profile) 55.92% 2003
97 Syria 55% 2003
98 Haiti 54% 2003
=99 Bolivia 53% 2003
=99 Equatorial Guinea 53% 2003
101 Benin 52% 2003
102 Brazil 50% 2003
103 Laos 49% 2003
104 Lesotho 48% 2003
105 Algeria 47% 2003
106 Malawi 44% 2003
=107 Central African Republic 43% 2003
=107 Oman 43% 2003
109 Uganda 42% 2003
110 Kyrgyzstan 40% 2003
111 Kenya 38% 2003
112 Madagascar 37% 2003
=113 Bangladesh 34% 2003
=113 Nicaragua 34% 2003
115 Nigeria 33% 2003
=116 Swaziland 30% 2003
=116 Honduras 30% 2003
=118 Burundi 29% 2003
=118 Zambia 29% 2003
=120 Botswana 28% 2003
=120 Yemen 28% 2003
=120 Togo 28% 2003
123 Guinea-Bissau 25% 2003
124 Guinea 23% 2003
125 Chad 21% 2003
126 Mali 20% 2003
127 Vanuatu 17% 2003
128 Djibouti 13% 2003
129 Senegal 8% 2003

Citation

"Countries Compared by Health > Access to sanitation. International Statistics at NationMaster.com", CIA World Factbook, December 2003. Aggregates compiled by NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/stats/Health/Access-to-sanitation

Health > Access to sanitation: Countries Compared Map

NationMaster

Interesting observations about Health > Access to sanitation

  • Australia ranked first for access to sanitation amongst Hot countries in 2003.
  • Canada ranked first for access to sanitation amongst Christian countries in 2003.
  • Turkey ranked first for access to sanitation amongst Muslim countries in 2003.
  • Morocco ranked first for access to sanitation amongst Former French colonies in 2003.
  • Mexico ranked first for access to sanitation amongst Former Spanish colonies in 2003.
  • Armenia ranked first for access to sanitation amongst Landlocked countries in 2003.
  • Gabon ranked first for access to sanitation amongst Sub-Saharan Africa in 2003.
  • Barbados ranked first for access to sanitation amongst Latin America and Caribbean in 2003.
  • Netherlands ranked second for access to sanitation globally in 2003.
  • United States ranked third for access to sanitation amongst Former British colonies in 2003.

3

This measure is defined as the proportion of the population with access to improved sanitation facilities. These facilities prevent contact with human excrement and prevent the spread of infectious diseases. Improved sanitation facilities include: piped sewer systems (flush or pour-flush), septic tanks or pit latrines; ventilated improved pit latrines; pit latrines with slabs; and composting toilets.

Access to improved sanitation facilities is vital in preventing morbidity and mortality from water borne diseases. It is estimated that 1.6 million people die from diarrheal diseases annually due to lack of basic sanitation, most of them children under 5 years old. Other diseases related to poor sanitation include schistosomiasis with 160 million infected, intestinal helminthes with 133 million infected and hepatitis A with 1.5 million new cases per year. Infection with trachoma is also related to poor hygiene, and is the leading cause of preventable blindness in the world.

Between 1990 and 2011, the percentage of people with no access to improved sanitation facilities has decreased from 85% to 75%. However, up to 40% of the world’s population still has no access to improved sanitation facilities. The lowest rates are in sub-Saharan Africa, Southern Asia and Eastern Asia, at 37%, 38% and 45%, respectively. Low income populations living in rural areas have the lowest coverage rates.

The problem of inadequate sanitation poses an economic burden to affected countries due to the medical cost of hygiene related diseases and loss of income and productivity in those affected. The investment in improving sanitation can generate up to nine times its cost in economic benefits. The improvement in life expectancy at birth by 10 years can increase a country’s economic growth by 0.3 to 0.4% annually.

Citations:

1) World Health Organization. World Health Statistics 2013. http://www.who.int/gho/publications/worldhealthstatistics/ENWHS2013Full.pdf

2) World Health Organization. Water and sanitation health: health through safe drinking water and basic sanitation. http://www.who.int/watersanitationhealth/mdg1/en/

3) World Health Organization. 10 things you need to know about sanitation. http://www.unwater.org/downloads/media/sanitation/10Things.pdf

Posted on 14 Apr 2014

Luke.Metcalfe

Luke.Metcalfe

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