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Health > Death from cancer: Countries Compared

Author: chris.lockyer781

Author: chris.lockyer781

Cancer refers to a group of diseases caused by uncontrolled growth and spread of abnormal cells in any organ of the body. They are also called malignant tumors or neoplasms. This disease is characterized by the rapid increase in abnormal cells which invade other organ systems outside their boundaries in a process called metastasis. This is the major cause of death in cancer. They are related to genetic factors as well as environmental factors such as ultraviolet and ionizing radiation, chemical carcinogens and certain types of bacterial, viral and parasitic infections.

Worldwide, cancer is one of the leading causes of death. Cancer ranks as the number one cause of death in developed nations and second in developing nations. In 2012 alone, there were 8.2 million deaths from cancer. The top five types of cancer with the highest mortality rates are: lung cancer, liver cancer, stomach cancer, colorectal cancer and breast cancer.

In developed countries, the top three causes of cancer deaths among men are: lung cancer, colorectal cancer and prostate cancer. In women, the leading cause of death is breast cancer, followed by lung and colorectal cancer. Different trends are seen developing nations. In men, the top three causes of cancer deaths are lung cancer, liver cancer and stomach cancer. In women, these are breast cancer, cervical cancer and lung cancer.

Certain modifiable determinants account for 30% of cancer deaths including obesity, poor diet, lack of exercise, smoking and alcohol use. Smoking is related to 20% of cancer deaths worldwide, and causes 70% of all lung cancer deaths.

Although the incidence of cancer is lower in developing countries, they account for a larger percentage of cancer deaths worldwide. In 2008, 72% of cancer deaths were from low to middle income countries. This is due to lower survival rates caused by poor accessibility to optimal health care. For instance, of the 275,000 women who die annually from cervical cancer, more than 85% are from developing nations.

This disparity is notable even in palliative care. More than 99% of untreated and painful deaths from cancer occur in the developing world. In these countries, many patients diagnosed with cancer are sent home untreated without the benefit of palliative relief.

Due to the aging global population, it is estimated that many non communicable diseases including cancer will rise over the next 30 years.

DEFINITION: Cancer death incidence (per 100 000 population) for year 2000..

CONTENTS

# COUNTRY AMOUNT DATE GRAPH
1 NetherlandsNetherlands 433 deaths per 100,000 peopl 2000
2 ItalyItaly 418 deaths per 100,000 peopl 2000
3 HungaryHungary 411 deaths per 100,000 peopl 2000
4 LuxembourgLuxembourg 409.7 deaths per 100,000 peopl 2000
5 SlovakiaSlovakia 405.3 deaths per 100,000 peopl 2000
6 IrelandIreland 357.6 deaths per 100,000 peopl 2000
7 Czech RepublicCzech Republic 335.4 deaths per 100,000 peopl 2000
8 New ZealandNew Zealand 327.3 deaths per 100,000 peopl 2000
9 United StatesUnited States 321.9 deaths per 100,000 peopl 2000
10 AustraliaAustralia 298.9 deaths per 100,000 peopl 2000
11 NorwayNorway 289.4 deaths per 100,000 peopl 2000
12 FranceFrance 286.1 deaths per 100,000 peopl 2000
13 AustriaAustria 280 deaths per 100,000 peopl 2000
14 SwedenSweden 268.2 deaths per 100,000 peopl 2000
15 FinlandFinland 255.4 deaths per 100,000 peopl 2000
16 United KingdomUnited Kingdom 253.5 deaths per 100,000 peopl 2000

Citation

"All countries compared for Health > Death from cancer", OECD Health Data 2004. Aggregates compiled by NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/stats/Health/Death-from-cancer

Health > Death from cancer: Countries Compared Map

NationMaster

4

Cancer refers to a group of diseases caused by uncontrolled growth and spread of abnormal cells in any organ of the body. They are also called malignant tumors or neoplasms. This disease is characterized by the rapid increase in abnormal cells which invade other organ systems outside their boundaries in a process called metastasis. This is the major cause of death in cancer. They are related to genetic factors as well as environmental factors such as ultraviolet and ionizing radiation, chemical carcinogens and certain types of bacterial, viral and parasitic infections.

Worldwide, cancer is one of the leading causes of death. Cancer ranks as the number one cause of death in developed nations and second in developing nations. In 2012 alone, there were 8.2 million deaths from cancer. The top five types of cancer with the highest mortality rates are: lung cancer, liver cancer, stomach cancer, colorectal cancer and breast cancer.

In developed countries, the top three causes of cancer deaths among men are: lung cancer, colorectal cancer and prostate cancer. In women, the leading cause of death is breast cancer, followed by lung and colorectal cancer. Different trends are seen developing nations. In men, the top three causes of cancer deaths are lung cancer, liver cancer and stomach cancer. In women, these are breast cancer, cervical cancer and lung cancer.

Certain modifiable determinants account for 30% of cancer deaths including obesity, poor diet, lack of exercise, smoking and alcohol use. Smoking is related to 20% of cancer deaths worldwide, and causes 70% of all lung cancer deaths.

Although the incidence of cancer is lower in developing countries, they account for a larger percentage of cancer deaths worldwide. In 2008, 72% of cancer deaths were from low to middle income countries. This is due to lower survival rates caused by poor accessibility to optimal health care. For instance, of the 275,000 women who die annually from cervical cancer, more than 85% are from developing nations.

This disparity is notable even in palliative care. More than 99% of untreated and painful deaths from cancer occur in the developing world. In these countries, many patients diagnosed with cancer are sent home untreated without the benefit of palliative relief.

Due to the aging global population, it is estimated that many non communicable diseases including cancer will rise over the next 30 years.

Posted on 14 Apr 2014

chris.lockyer781

chris.lockyer781

376

0

African Americans are more likely to die from cancer than any other racial or ethnic group. Although cancer death rates are dropping among African Americans in the United States, the gap between blacks and whites remains large, according to the American Cancer Society.

A new report estimates that there will be 137,910 new cases of cancer among African Americans in 2005, and 63,110 cancer deaths. The overall death rate from all cancers combined declined by 1.6 percent among African Americans each year between 1993 and 2001, which is greater than the 1 percent yearly decline seen among whites in the same period.

However, lung cancer rates are 47% higher among African-American men than white men. The death rate from lung cancer is 36% higher than for white men. Lung cancer is expected to claim 15,500 lives among African Americans in 2005.

Colon cancer rates are also higher among African Americans than whites. Colon cancer is the third-leading cause of cancer death among African-American men and women. It is expected to kill about 7,080 African Americans in 2005.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among African-American women, and the second leading cause of cancer death. About 19,240 new cases are expected this year. Breast cancer is actually less common among African-American women than white women, except in the case of women under 40. But African-American women are more likely to die from it. About 5,640 black women are expected to die of breast cancer this year.

Prostate cancer rates are 60% higher in African-American men than white men and death rates are nearly two-and-a-half times higher. About 30,770 prostate cancer cases and 5,050 deaths are expected in 2005.

Posted on 20 May 2005

Ian Graham <br>Staff Editor

Ian Graham <br>Staff Editor

0

http://www.earth-policy.org/plan_b_updates/2011/update96

Article-Cancer now the leading cause of death in China.

Posted on 16 Jan 2012

Rdizzy

Rdizzy

0

@RickyB

Read the article: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-12054984

Yes, Canada has public health care system, and the latest news published in Lancet it exceeds in cancer survival rate along with Australia and Sweden.

Posted on 23 Dec 2010

Lela

Lela

0

The bad news: If a man lives long enough he'll get prostate cancer. The good news: of 100,000 deaths only 322 will be related to it (in the US). Not a major concern imo.

Posted on 25 Aug 2010

CB

CB

0

I wouldn't trust a websites 411 that can't sort numbers from smallest to largest.

Posted on 22 Jun 2010

Yeah Right

Yeah Right

0

The reason why African, South American and Asian countries are not included is very simple - they don't suffer from the abundance disease. They have less protein and fat in their diets and much more carbohydrates (plant based diets). Several studies show that high protein diets are carcinogenic (see China Study for reference).
So even though in "poor" countries the health care is not able to fight and/or diagnose cancer in many cases, they are still in much better position then citizens of Western countries. They are less likely to develop cancer at all.

Posted on 20 Apr 2010

Tom Altren

Tom Altren

0

David Elliott Lewis, Ph.D. the reason you dont see countries from the 3rd world, like Africa, is because of at least two reasons.

First there life expectancy might be very low and cancer usually shows up in mid to late in life. So people die before cancer gets to them.

Secondly, and more importantly for a list like this is the ability to count the people with cancer. Cancer rates may be very high in an African country but if the people don't know they have it or can not report it due to lack of hospital facilities and/or possibly government interference. The poor souls can't be counted and thus will never show up on a list.

Posted on 01 Dec 2009

Mr Man

Mr Man

0

5,350.7 deaths per 1.6 MILLION people--it's an additive property. You add the total of deaths AND the total ratio base.

This graph is very badly done and misleading.

Posted on 25 Nov 2009

Michael Z. Williamson

Michael Z. Williamson

0

I find it very strange that no countries from Africa, Latin America or Asia (except Japan) are on this list. Why is that?

Posted on 19 Nov 2009

David Elliott Lewis, Ph.D.

David Elliott Lewis, Ph.D.

0

This is really great.

Posted on 15 Nov 2009

ec

ec

0

I read the graph to indicate the number
of deaths. Fewer deaths in UK than
Norway thus the ranking.

Posted on 24 Aug 2009

Sue

Sue

0

How are you interpreting the OECD data?

These numbers differ from the OECD Health Data Frequently Requested Data available from their website which you site as the source.

http://www.irdes.fr/EcoSante/DownLoad/OECDHealthData_FrequentlyRequestedData.xls


Posted on 14 Aug 2009

JDR

JDR

0

Your graph is badly messed up:

1) Your numbers are backwards. That is, the UK should have the worst numbers, not the best.

2) Austria, for some reason, doesn't sort properly. Even though it's rank is 13th, it sorts out between 3 and 4 instead of 12 and 14.

Please fix it.

Posted on 19 Jul 2009

StuRat

StuRat

0

Adult survivors of childhood cancers face an increased risk of suffering from health problems including heart disease, infertility and kidney disease, according to the Childhood Cancer Survivors Study. By the time they are 45, those who survived childhood cancer are four times as likely as cancer-free siblings to report severe health conditions.

The study compared the health status of 10,397 survivors of childhood cancers diagnosed and treated between 1970 and 1986, with the health status of more than 3,034 healthy siblings. It found that survivors of Hodgkin’s lymphoma are 4.4 times more likely to have more than two serious medical conditions – such as a second malignant neoplasm, myocardial infarction (heart attack), coronary artery bypass surgery, heart transplant, end-stage kidney disease, or paralysis – than cancer-free siblings. Chest radiation and anthracycline-based chemotherapy treatments carried the highest risk for long-term complications.

The median survival rate for childhood cancers in the United States is almost at 80%, but at least two-thirds of childhood cancer survivors develop chronic health conditions associated with cancer treatment and a third have serious, life-threatening conditions.

Posted on 17 May 2005

Ian Graham <br>Staff Editor

Ian Graham <br>Staff Editor

0

The most commonly diagnosed non-skin cancer in the United States, prostate cancer will afflict one in six American men over the course of his lifetime and an American man is actually 33 percent more likely to develop prostate cancer than an American woman is to develop breast cancer.

The Prostate Cancer Foundation says that over 232,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2005, and 30,000 men will die from it. It is estimated that there are over 2 million American men currently living with prostate cancer.

In the United States, one new case of prostate cancer occurs every 2.5 minutes and a man dies from the disease every 17 minutes. The chance of developing prostate cancer increases rapidly after age 50. More than 70 percent of all prostate cancers are diagnosed in men over the age of 65.

Prostate cancer is the second-leading cause (next to lung cancer) of cancer-related deaths among men in the U.S. African-American men are 65 percent more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer than Caucasian-Americans and are more than twice as likely to die from it.

However, because prostate cancer is a relatively slow-growing cancer, the 5-year survival rate for prostate cancer diagnosed at all stages is 98%. The 10-year survival rate is 84% and the 15-year survival rate is 56%.

Posted on 14 Apr 2005

Ian Graham <br>Staff Editor

Ian Graham <br>Staff Editor

0

A study published in the International Journal of Cancer, based on a comparison of 585 people with pancreatic and 4,779 people without the diseases, suggests that the risk of this particular cancer decreases as fruit and vegetable consumption increases.

A large study of Canadians diagnosed with cancer between 1994 and 1997 found that eating more fresh fruit and cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli and cauliflower, was associated with a lower risk of pancreatic cancer. However, the relationship between the two was confined to men. There was no clear association between diet and pancreatic cancer risk among women.

Among cancers, pancreatic tumors have one of the lowest survival rates, with less than five percent of patients living for five years after being diagnosed. This is mainly because the disease is rarely caught early.

Posted on 04 Apr 2005

Ian Graham <br>Staff Editor

Ian Graham <br>Staff Editor

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