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United Kingdom

United Kingdom Government Stats

chris.lockyer781

Author: chris.lockyer781

The prime minister is the head of the government in the United Kingdom. He or she has responsibility for selecting all other ministers. The prime minister and the other most senior ministers, make up the cabinet. The government ministers are all associates of the Parliament, and are responsible to it. Parliament legislates and passes bills which then become laws.

The citizens choose a new government in general elections every 5 years but in recent decades, it has been held every 4 years. Following the elections, the head of state, which is the queen, chooses as prime minister, the member of parliament who is most likely to control a greater number of seats in parliament.

The current head of state is queen Elizabeth II, the prime minister is David Cameron and the leader of the opposition is Ed Miliband.

A coaliton government currently exists with the Conservative Party joining forces with the Liberal Democrats. This follows elections of May, 2010, when there was no clear winner. Elections in the UK are usually clear cut with the first past the post being declared as the winner.

Definitions

  • Administrative divisions: This entry generally gives the numbers, designatory terms, and first-order administrative divisions as approved by the US Board on Geographic Names (BGN). Changes that have been reported but not yet acted on by BGN are noted.
  • Capital city > Geographic coordinates: This entry gives the name of the seat of government, its geographic coordinates, the time difference relative to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) and the time observed in Washington, DC, and, if applicable, information on daylight saving time (DST). Where appropriate, a special note has been added to highlight those countries that have multiple time zones.
  • Capital city > Name: This entry gives the name of the seat of government, its geographic coordinates, the time difference relative to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) and the time observed in Washington, DC, and, if applicable, information on daylight saving time (DST). Where appropriate, a special note has been added to highlight those countries that have multiple time zones.
  • Constitution: The dates of adoption, revisions, and major amendments to a nation's constitution
  • Diplomatic representation from the US > Mailing address: This entry includes the chief of mission, embassy address, mailing address, telephone number, FAX number, branch office locations, consulate general locations, and consulate locations.
  • Executive branch > Cabinet: Cabinet includes the official name for any body of high-ranking advisers roughly comparable to a U.S. Cabinet. Also notes the method for selection of members.
  • Executive branch > Head of government: Head of government includes the name and title of the top administrative leader who is designated to manage the day-to-day activities of the government. For example, in the UK, the monarch is the chief of state, and the prime minister is the head of government. In the US, the president is both the chief of state and the head of government.
  • Government type: A description of the basic form of government (e.g., republic, constitutional monarchy, federal republic, parliamentary democracy, military dictatorship).
  • International organization participation: This entry lists in alphabetical order by abbreviation those international organizations in which the subject country is a member or participates in some other way.
  • Judicial branch: The name(s) of the highest court(s) and a brief description of the selection process for members.
  • Legal system: A brief description of the legal system's historical roots, role in government, and acceptance of International Court of Justice (ICJ) jurisdiction.
  • Legislative branch: This entry contains information on the structure (unicameral, bicameral, tricameral), formal name, number of seats, and term of office. Elections includes the nature of election process or accession to power, date of the last election, and date of the next election. Election results includes the percent of vote and/or number of seats held by each party in the last election.
  • Political parties and leaders: Significant political organizations and their leaders.
  • Political pressure groups and leaders: Organizations with leaders involved in politics, but not standing for legislative election.
  • Suffrage: The age at enfranchisement and whether the right to vote is universal or restricted
STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Administrative divisions England: 27 two-tier counties, 32 London boroughs and 1 City of London or Greater London, 36 metropolitan districts, 56 unitary authorities (including 4 single-tier counties*)
two-tier counties: Buckinghamshire, Cambridgeshire, Cumbria, Derbyshire, Devon, Dorset, East Sussex, Essex, Gloucestershire, Hampshire, Hertfordshire, Kent, Lancashire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Norfolk, North Yorkshire, Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire, Oxfordshire, Somerset, Staffordshire, Suffolk, Surrey, Warwickshire, West Sussex, Worcestershire
London boroughs and City of London or Greater London: Barking and Dagenham, Barnet, Bexley, Brent, Bromley, Camden, Croydon, Ealing, Enfield, Greenwich, Hackney, Hammersmith and Fulham, Haringey, Harrow, Havering, Hillingdon, Hounslow, Islington, Kensington and Chelsea, Kingston upon Thames, Lambeth, Lewisham, City of London, Merton, Newham, Redbridge, Richmond upon Thames, Southwark, Sutton, Tower Hamlets, Waltham Forest, Wandsworth, Westminster
metropolitan districts: Barnsley, Birmingham, Bolton, Bradford, Bury, Calderdale, Coventry, Doncaster, Dudley, Gateshead, Kirklees, Knowlsey, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Newcastle upon Tyne, North Tyneside, Oldham, Rochdale, Rotherham, Salford, Sandwell, Sefton, Sheffield, Solihull, South Tyneside, St. Helens, Stockport, Sunderland, Tameside, Trafford, Wakefield, Walsall, Wigan, Wirral, Wolverhampton
unitary authorities: Bath and North East Somerset, Blackburn with Darwen, Bedford, Blackpool, Bournemouth, Bracknell Forest, Brighton and Hove, City of Bristol, Central Bedfordshire, Cheshire East, Cheshire West and Chester, Cornwall, Darlington, Derby, Durham County*, East Riding of Yorkshire, Halton, Hartlepool, Herefordshire*, Isle of Wight*, Isles of Scilly, City of Kingston upon Hull, Leicester, Luton, Medway, Middlesbrough, Milton Keynes, North East Lincolnshire, North Lincolnshire, North Somerset, Northumberland*, Nottingham, Peterborough, Plymouth, Poole, Portsmouth, Reading, Redcar and Cleveland, Rutland, Shropshire, Slough, South Gloucestershire, Southampton, Southend-on-Sea, Stockton-on-Tees, Stoke-on-Trent, Swindon, Telford and Wrekin, Thurrock, Torbay, Warrington, West Berkshire, Wiltshire, Windsor and Maidenhead, Wokingham, York
Northern Ireland: 26 district council areas
district council areas: Antrim, Ards, Armagh, Ballymena, Ballymoney, Banbridge, Belfast, Carrickfergus, Castlereagh, Coleraine, Cookstown, Craigavon, Derry, Down, Dungannon and South Tyrone, Fermanagh, Larne, Limavady, Lisburn, Magherafelt, Moyle, Newry and Mourne, Newtownabbey, North Down, Omagh, Strabane
Scotland: 32 council areas
council areas: Aberdeen City, Aberdeenshire, Angus, Argyll and Bute, Clackmannanshire, Dumfries and Galloway, Dundee City, East Ayrshire, East Dunbartonshire, East Lothian, East Renfrewshire, City of Edinburgh, Eilean Siar (Western Isles), Falkirk, Fife, Glasgow City, Highland, Inverclyde, Midlothian, Moray, North Ayrshire, North Lanarkshire, Orkney Islands, Perth and Kinross, Renfrewshire, Shetland Islands, South Ayrshire, South Lanarkshire, Stirling, The Scottish Borders, West Dunbartonshire, West Lothian
Wales: 22 unitary authorities
unitary authorities: Blaenau Gwent; Bridgend; Caerphilly; Cardiff; Carmarthenshire; Ceredigion; Conwy; Denbighshire; Flintshire; Gwynedd; Isle of Anglesey; Merthyr Tydfil; Monmouthshire; Neath Port Talbot; Newport; Pembrokeshire; Powys; Rhondda Cynon Taff; Swansea; The Vale of Glamorgan; Torfaen; Wrexham
2013
Capital city > Geographic coordinates 51 2010
Capital city > Name London 2011
Constitution unwritten; partly statutes, partly common law and practice 2012
Diplomatic representation from the US > Mailing address PSC 801, Box 40, FPO AE 09498-4040 2013
Executive branch > Cabinet Cabinet of Ministers appointed by the prime minister 2013
Executive branch > Head of government Prime Minister David CAMERON (since 11 May 2010) 2013
Government type constitutional monarchy and Commonwealth realm 2013
International organization participation ADB (nonregional member), AfDB (nonregional member), Arctic Council (observer), Australia Group, BIS, C, CBSS (observer), CD, CDB, CE, CERN, EAPC, EBRD, EIB, EITI (implementing country), ESA, EU, FAO, FATF, G-20, G-5, G-7, G-8, G-10, IADB, IAEA, IBRD, ICAO, ICC (national committees), ICRM, IDA, IEA, IFAD, IFC, IFRCS, IGAD (partners), IHO, ILO, IMF, IMO, IMSO, Interpol, IOC, IOM, IPU, ISO, ITSO, ITU, ITUC (NGOs), MIGA, MONUSCO, NATO, NEA, NSG, OAS (observer), OECD, OPCW, OSCE, Paris Club, PCA, PIF (partner), SELEC (observer), UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNFICYP, UNHCR, UNIDO, UNISFA, UNMISS, UNRWA, UNSC (permanent), UPU, WCO, WHO, WIPO, WMO, WTO, ZC 2013
Judicial branch Supreme Court of the UK (established in October 2009 taking over appellate jurisdiction formerly vested in the House of Lords is the final court of appeal); Senior Courts of England and Wales (comprising the Court of Appeal, the High Court of Justice, and the Crown Courts); Court of Judicature (Northern Ireland); Scotland's Court of Session and High Court of the Justiciary 2012
Legal system common law system; has nonbinding judicial review of Acts of Parliament under the Human Rights Act of 1998 2013
Legislative branch bicameral Parliament consists of House of Lords 2010
Political parties and leaders Conservative [David CAMERON]
Democratic Unionist Party or DUP (Northern Ireland) [Peter ROBINSON]
Labor Party [Ed MILIBAND]
Liberal Democrats (Lib Dems) [Nick CLEGG]
Party of Wales (Plaid Cymru) [Leanne WOOD]
Scottish National Party or SNP [Alex SALMOND]
Sinn Fein (Northern Ireland) [Gerry ADAMS]
Social Democratic and Labor Party or SDLP (Northern Ireland) [Alasdair MCDONNELL]
Ulster Unionist Party (Northern Ireland) [Mike NESBITT]
United Kingdom Independent Party or UKIP [Nigel FARAGE]
2013
Political pressure groups and leaders Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament
Confederation of British Industry
National Farmers' Union
Trades Union Congress
2013
Suffrage 18 years of age; universal 2013

SOURCES: CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011

Citation

"United Kingdom Government Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/United-Kingdom/Government

2

The prime minister is the head of the government in the United Kingdom. He or she has responsibility for selecting all other ministers. The prime minister and the other most senior ministers, make up the cabinet. The government ministers are all associates of the Parliament, and are responsible to it. Parliament legislates and passes bills which then become laws.

The citizens choose a new government in general elections every 5 years but in recent decades, it has been held every 4 years. Following the elections, the head of state, which is the queen, chooses as prime minister, the member of parliament who is most likely to control a greater number of seats in parliament.

The current head of state is queen Elizabeth II, the prime minister is David Cameron and the leader of the opposition is Ed Miliband.

A coaliton government currently exists with the Conservative Party joining forces with the Liberal Democrats. This follows elections of May, 2010, when there was no clear winner. Elections in the UK are usually clear cut with the first past the post being declared as the winner.

Posted on 28 Mar 2014

chris.lockyer781

chris.lockyer781

396 Stat enthusiast

2

The prime minister is the head of the government in the United Kingdom. He or she has responsibility for selecting all other ministers. The prime minister and the other most senior ministers, make up the cabinet. The government ministers are all associates of the Parliament, and are responsible to it. Parliament legislates and passes bills which then become laws.

The citizens choose a new government in general elections every 5 years but in recent decades, it has been held every 4 years. Following the elections, the head of state, which is the queen, chooses as prime minister, the member of parliament who is most likely to control a greater number of seats in parliament.

The current head of state is queen Elizabeth II, the prime minister is David Cameron and the leader of the opposition is Ed Miliband.

A coaliton government currently exists with the Conservative Party joining forces with the Liberal Democrats. This follows elections of May, 2010, when there was no clear winner. Elections in the UK are usually clear cut with the first past the post being declared as the winner.

Posted on 09 Apr 2014

chris.lockyer781

chris.lockyer781

396 Stat enthusiast

-1

Time to start a business in the UK is in fact INSTANT, no forms are required, no permission is required all you need to do is inform the Tax authourity within the next twelve months.

Should you require a limited Company this can be done on line with a credit card in under ten minutes.

As for corruption, never in 40 years of managing a business have I come accross annything more than a bottle of drink at Christmas or the odd invitation to a corporate event. Neither have I ever come accross corrupt government officials so how you compile your statistics is a total mystery to me!

Posted on 05 Jan 2010

Tom Brown

Tom Brown

-3

Lovely Discription, im a movie critic but working on a project. I enjoy the information givin.

Posted on 13 Apr 2010

Cheese Swissger

Cheese Swissger