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Cuba

Cuba Government Stats

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Author: Edsel.G

The Cuban government is one of the few governments abiding by the Marxist-Leninist communist ideal. Although the socialist constitution of 1976 was revised, the succeeding constitution never swayed away from the communist line of thought. In fact, it even emphasized the need for strict adherence to the principles of socialism.

Being a communist country, Cuba has a single most powerful political party, the Communist Party of Cuba. The National Assembly of People’s Power is the most powerful organ in the country. The 614-member assembly is composed of delegates voted by the people. The delegates serve for five years, but they do not get any salary from the government (delegates are required to have other jobs; they are not full-time politicians). The Assembly chooses the 31 Ministers, and even the President of the republic, who is currently Raul Castro, the brother of the late strongman, Fidel Castro. Because the candidates come from a single party without opposition, the said candidates are expected to win, normally with 100% of the total vote.

Cuba is accused by the international community of committing human rights violations and abridging freedom of speech. As of 2013, Cuba had the second highest number of journalists as prisoners, the first being China. Because of this, Cuba’s economic growth is hampered by numerous damaging sanctions from the US and its allies. However, the friendlier approach of the current president is expected to alleviate said sanctions.

Profile:

Raul Castro, the world's longest-serving defence minister, took over as president in February 2008, succeeding his ailing brother Fidel, who had been in power for five decades.

Raul Castro became acting president 18 months earlier when his brother was incapacitated, and was formally named as president by the National Assembly days after Fidel announced his retirement.

After being re-elected by the single-party National Assembly in February 2013, Raul announced his intention to stand down at the end of his second term in 2018.

He had earlier called for a two-term limit and age caps for political offices, including the presidency, and eased out a number of his brother's elderly appointees in July 2013.

Fidel Castro brought revolution to Cuba in the 1950s and created the western hemisphere's first Communist state. His beard, long speeches, cigar, army fatigues and defiance of the United States earned him iconic status across the globe.

Raul, 76 at the time of this appointment, has been his brother's trusted right-hand man and was once known as an iron-fisted ideologue who executed Fidel Castro's orders - and enemies - ruthlessly.

Under his leadership, Cuba's Revolutionary Armed Forces became one of the most formidable fighting forces in the Third World with combat experience in Africa, where they defeated South Africa's army in Angola in 1987.

A capable administrator, Raul Castro substantially cut the size of the army after the collapse of Soviet Communism threw Cuba into severe economic crisis. He introduced Western business practices to help make the armed forces self-sufficient. The military has a large stake in the most dynamic sectors of the Cuban economy, including tourism.

Raul Castro has also eased some restrictions on personal freedoms by lifting bans on mobile phones and home computers, and abolished the need of citizens to buy expensive exit visas when travelling abroad as tourists.

Following the election of US President Barack Obama, he said he was willing to respond to overtures from Washington and enter into dialogue with the US administration, but insisted that Cuba's Communist system remained non-negotiable.

Definitions

  • Administrative divisions: This entry generally gives the numbers, designatory terms, and first-order administrative divisions as approved by the US Board on Geographic Names (BGN). Changes that have been reported but not yet acted on by BGN are noted.
  • Capital city > Geographic coordinates: This entry gives the name of the seat of government, its geographic coordinates, the time difference relative to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) and the time observed in Washington, DC, and, if applicable, information on daylight saving time (DST). Where appropriate, a special note has been added to highlight those countries that have multiple time zones.
  • Capital city > Name: This entry gives the name of the seat of government, its geographic coordinates, the time difference relative to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) and the time observed in Washington, DC, and, if applicable, information on daylight saving time (DST). Where appropriate, a special note has been added to highlight those countries that have multiple time zones.
  • Constitution: The dates of adoption, revisions, and major amendments to a nation's constitution
  • Executive branch > Cabinet: Cabinet includes the official name for any body of high-ranking advisers roughly comparable to a U.S. Cabinet. Also notes the method for selection of members.
  • Executive branch > Elections: Elections includes the nature of election process or accession to power, date of the last election, and date of the next election
  • Executive branch > Head of government: Head of government includes the name and title of the top administrative leader who is designated to manage the day-to-day activities of the government. For example, in the UK, the monarch is the chief of state, and the prime minister is the head of government. In the US, the president is both the chief of state and the head of government.
  • Government type: A description of the basic form of government (e.g., republic, constitutional monarchy, federal republic, parliamentary democracy, military dictatorship).
  • International organization participation: This entry lists in alphabetical order by abbreviation those international organizations in which the subject country is a member or participates in some other way.
  • Judicial branch: The name(s) of the highest court(s) and a brief description of the selection process for members.
  • Legal system: A brief description of the legal system's historical roots, role in government, and acceptance of International Court of Justice (ICJ) jurisdiction.
  • Legislative branch: This entry contains information on the structure (unicameral, bicameral, tricameral), formal name, number of seats, and term of office. Elections includes the nature of election process or accession to power, date of the last election, and date of the next election. Election results includes the percent of vote and/or number of seats held by each party in the last election.
  • Political parties and leaders: Significant political organizations and their leaders.
  • Political pressure groups and leaders: Organizations with leaders involved in politics, but not standing for legislative election.
  • Suffrage: The age at enfranchisement and whether the right to vote is universal or restricted
STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Administrative divisions 15 provinces (provincias, singular - provincia) and 1 special municipality* (municipio especial); Artemisa, Camaguey, Ciego de Avila, Cienfuegos, Granma, Guantanamo, Holguin, Isla de la Juventud*, La Habana, Las Tunas, Matanzas, Mayabeque, Pinar del Rio, Sancti Spiritus, Santiago de Cuba, Villa Clara 2013
Capital city > Geographic coordinates 23 07 N, 82 21 W 2008
Capital city > Name Havana 2011
Constitution 24 February 1976; amended July 1992 and June 2002 2012
Executive branch > Cabinet Council of Ministers proposed by the president of the Council of State and appointed by the National Assembly or the 28-member Council of State, elected by the assembly to act on its behalf when it is not in session 2013
Executive branch > Elections president and vice presidents elected by the National Assembly for a five-year term; election last held on 24 February 2013 (next to be held in 2018) 2013
Executive branch > Head of government President of the Council of State and President of the Council of Ministers Gen. Raul CASTRO Ruz (president since 24 February 2008); First Vice President of the Council of State and First Vice President of the Council of Ministers Miguel DIAZ-CANEL Bermudez (since 24 February 2013) 2013
Government type Communist state 2013
International organization participation ACP, ALBA, AOSIS, CELAC, FAO, G-77, IAEA, ICAO, ICC (national committees), ICRM, IFAD, IFRCS, IHO, ILO, IMO, IMSO, Interpol, IOC, IOM (observer), IPU, ISO, ITSO, ITU, LAES, LAIA, NAM, OAS (excluded from formal participation since 1962), OPANAL, OPCW, PCA, Petrocaribe, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNIDO, Union Latina, UNWTO, UPU, WCO, WFTU (NGOs), WHO, WIPO, WMO, WTO 2013
Judicial branch People's Supreme Court or Tribunal Supremo Popular (president, vice presidents, and other judges are elected by the National Assembly) 2012
Legal system civil law system based on Spanish civil code 2013
Legislative branch unicameral National Assembly of People's Power or Asemblea Nacional del Poder Popular (number of seats in the National Assembly is based on population; 614 seats; members elected directly from slates approved by special candidacy commissions to serve five-year terms) 2011
Political parties and leaders Cuban Communist Party or PCC [Raul CASTRO Ruz, first secretary] 2013
Political pressure groups and leaders Human Rights Watch
National Association of Small Farmers
2013
Suffrage 16 years of age; universal 2013

SOURCES: CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011

Citation

"Cuba Government Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/Cuba/Government

  • Cuba ranked second for proportion of seats held by women in national parliament amongst Hot countries in 2006.

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The Cuban government is one of the few governments abiding by the Marxist-Leninist communist ideal. Although the socialist constitution of 1976 was revised, the succeeding constitution never swayed away from the communist line of thought. In fact, it even emphasized the need for strict adherence to the principles of socialism.

Being a communist country, Cuba has a single most powerful political party, the Communist Party of Cuba. The National Assembly of People’s Power is the most powerful organ in the country. The 614-member assembly is composed of delegates voted by the people. The delegates serve for five years, but they do not get any salary from the government (delegates are required to have other jobs; they are not full-time politicians). The Assembly chooses the 31 Ministers, and even the President of the republic, who is currently Raul Castro, the brother of the late strongman, Fidel Castro. Because the candidates come from a single party without opposition, the said candidates are expected to win, normally with 100% of the total vote.

Cuba is accused by the international community of committing human rights violations and abridging freedom of speech. As of 2013, Cuba had the second highest number of journalists as prisoners, the first being China. Because of this, Cuba’s economic growth is hampered by numerous damaging sanctions from the US and its allies. However, the friendlier approach of the current president is expected to alleviate said sanctions.

Posted on 06 Apr 2014

Edsel.G

Edsel.G

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