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Greece

Greece Military Stats

Luke.Metcalfe

Author: Luke.Metcalfe

Greece has pretty broad borders. The recent Greek history consists of a series of wars for freedom and national independence. Greeks faced multiple conflicts with the Ottomans during the last two centuries, and logically Turkey and Greece are fierce rivals. During the Second Balkan War, Greece faced Bulgaria. Finally, during the two World Wars, Greece faced multiple nations, including Albania, Italy, Germany and the newly established nation of Turkey. Obviously, Greece opposed all neighboring countries pretty recently. The wounds of the past are recent, and this keeps the Greek army on alert.

National defense is important to Greece and statistical facts prove the same. Greece has one of the most equipped armies in Europe, owning the most aircrafts per 1 million citizens (45.65 aircrafts per million people) and a respectable number of war tanks (154.55 tanks per million people), artillery units (171.2 artillery units per million people) and conventional weapons. According to 1990 stats, Greece imports conventional weapons that cost 1.43 billion, or 1.54% of GDP). Military equipment requires money, so Greek state spends lot of money. For example, 4.48% of Greek GDP was used for military expenditures in 2005.

Even with a well-equipped military, war conflicts still need manpower. For this reason, Greece is prepared. Men between 19-45 years are obliged to serve in the Greek army for a year. Almost 5 men out of 1,000 citizens recruit the new recruitment unit. Women can also serve in the Greek army if they wish. Greece has in total 15.13 soldiers per 1,000 people.

The three branches of Greek army are: Hellenic Army (Ellinikos Stratos, ES), Hellenic Navy (Elliniko Polemiko Navtiko, EPN), Hellenic Air Force (Elliniki Polemiki Aeroporia, EPA). Greece is also part of the NATO alliance. For this reason, Greece has offered military help multiple times during regional conflicts. For example, the Greek Army was present in Iraq and Serbia war conflicts.

Definitions

  • Active Ground Forces > Active Personnel > 2008: Strength of active personnel in ground forces of European Union member states in 2008. Figures do not include personnel in navy and air force.
  • Active military personnel: Active military personnel.
  • Active military personnel per thousand people: Active military personnel. Figures expressed per thousand people for the same year.
  • Air force > Combat aircraft: Number of fighter aircrafts (fixed wing aircrafts with combat capability).
  • Air force > Combat aircraft per million people: Number of fighter aircrafts (fixed wing aircrafts with combat capability). Figures expressed per million people for the same year.
  • Air force > F-16 fighers: F-16.
  • Air force > Mirage aircraft: Mirage 2000.
  • Air force > Mirage aircraft per million people: Mirage 2000. Figures expressed per million people for the same year.
  • Air force > United States air force deployments: USAF.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Armed forces growth: Growth in the number of armed forces personnel from 1985 (index = 100) to 2000. 100 means no growth, 50 means it halved and 200 means it doubled.
  • Armed forces personnel: Total armed forces (2000)
  • Armed forces personnel > Total: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organisation, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces."
  • Armed forces personnel per 1000: Total armed forces (2000). Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Arms trade > Arms imports, top countries: Compares the world's largest arms importers, in millions of US Dollars. Data corresponds to the year 2010, and was compiled by SIPRI (Stockholm International Peace Research Institute), a think tank dedicated to the research of conflict, armaments, arms control and disarmament in the world, with presence in Stockholm, Beijing and Washington DC. For more comprehensive statistics, visit the intitute's databases section
  • Army > Attack helicopters: Number of attack helicopter (includes helicopters that have some attacking capabilities).
  • Army > Attack helicopters per million people: Number of attack helicopter (includes helicopters that have some attacking capabilities). Figures expressed per million people for the same year.
  • Army > Main battle tanks: Number of main battle tanks.
  • Army > Main battle tanks per million people: Number of main battle tanks. Figures expressed per million people for the same year.
  • Army > Mortars: Mortar.
  • Army > Multiple rocket launchers: Multiple rocket launcher.
  • Army > Self-propelled guns: Self-propelled gun.
  • Army > Towed artillery units: Towed artillery.
  • Army > Troops prepared for deployed and sustained operation: Troops prepared for deployed and sustained operation.
  • Army > Troops prepared for deployed operations: Troops prepared for deployed operations.
  • Army > United States army deployments: Army.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Branches: The names of the ground, naval, air, marine, and other defense or security forces
  • Budget: Annual defense budget in billion USD.
  • Budget per million people: Annual defense budget in billion USD. Figures expressed per million people for the same year.
  • Conscription: A description of the status of conscription in the nation in 1997.
  • Defence spending > Percent of GDP: Defense expenditure as percentage of GDP. Figures are for the year 2010.
  • Expenditure > Current LCU: Military expenditures data from SIPRI are derived from the NATO definition, which includes all current and capital expenditures on the armed forces, including peacekeeping forces; defense ministries and other government agencies engaged in defense projects; paramilitary forces, if these are judged to be trained and equipped for military operations; and military space activities. Such expenditures include military and civil personnel, including retirement pensions of military personnel and social services for personnel; operation and maintenance; procurement; military research and development; and military aid (in the military expenditures of the donor country). Excluded are civil defense and current expenditures for previous military activities, such as for veterans' benefits, demobilization, conversion, and destruction of weapons. This definition cannot be applied for all countries, however, since that would require much more detailed information than is available about what is included in military budgets and off-budget military expenditure items. (For example, military budgets might or might not cover civil defense, reserves and auxiliary forces, police and paramilitary forces, dual-purpose forces such as military and civilian police, military grants in kind, pensions for military personnel, and social security contributions paid by one part of government to another.)
  • Expenditures > Dollar figure: Current military expenditures in US dollars; the figure is calculated by multiplying the estimated defense spending in percentage terms by the gross domestic product (GDP) calculated on an exchange rate basis not purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Dollar figures for military expenditures should be treated with caution because of different price patterns and accounting methods among nations, as well as wide variations in the strength of their currencies
  • Expenditures > Dollar figure per capita: Current military expenditures in US dollars; the figure is calculated by multiplying the estimated defense spending in percentage terms by the gross domestic product (GDP) calculated on an exchange rate basis not purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Dollar figures for military expenditures should be treated with caution because of different price patterns and accounting methods among nations, as well as wide variations in the strength of their currencies. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Expenditures > Percent of GDP: Current military expenditures as an estimated percent of gross domestic product (GDP).
  • Global Peace Index: The Global Peace Index is comprised of 22 indicators in the three categories ongoing domestic or international conflicts; societal safety; and security and militarization. A low index value indicates a peaceful and safe country.
  • Gulf War Coalition Forces: Number of troops who served on active duty in the Gulf War theater of operations between August 2, 1990, and June 13, 1991.
  • Imports > USD: Arms transfers cover the supply of military weapons through sales, aid, gifts, and those made through manufacturing licenses. Data cover major conventional weapons such as aircraft, armored vehicles, artillery, radar systems, missiles, and ships designed for military use. Excluded are transfers of other military equipment such as small arms and light weapons, trucks, small artillery, ammunition, support equipment, technology transfers, and other services."
  • Manpower > Reaching military age annually > Males: The number of draft-age males and females entering the military manpower pool in any given year and is a measure of the availability of draft-age young adults.
  • Manpower reaching military age annually > Males: This entry is derived from Military > Manpower reaching military age annually, which gives the number of males and females entering the military manpower pool (i.e., reaching age 16) in any given year and is a measure of the availability of military-age young adults.
  • Military branches: This entry lists the service branches subordinate to defense ministries or the equivalent (typically ground, naval, air, and marine forces).
  • Military expenditure > Current LCU: Military expenditures data from SIPRI are derived from the NATO definition, which includes all current and capital expenditures on the armed forces, including peacekeeping forces; defense ministries and other government agencies engaged in defense projects; paramilitary forces, if these are judged to be trained and equipped for military operations; and military space activities. Such expenditures include military and civil personnel, including retirement pensions of military personnel and social services for personnel; operation and maintenance; procurement; military research and development; and military aid (in the military expenditures of the donor country). Excluded are civil defense and current expenditures for previous military activities, such as for veterans' benefits, demobilisation, conversion, and destruction of weapons. This definition cannot be applied for all countries, however, since that would require much more detailed information than is available about what is included in military budgets and off-budget military expenditure items. (For example, military budgets might or might not cover civil defense, reserves and auxiliary forces, police and paramilitary forces, dual-purpose forces such as military and civilian police, military grants in kind, pensions for military personnel, and social security contributions paid by one part of government to another.)"
  • Military expenditures: This entry gives spending on defense programs for the most recent year available as a percent of gross domestic product (GDP); the GDP is calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in terms of purchasing power parity (PPP). For countries with no military forces, this figure can include expenditures on public security and police.
  • Military service age and obligation: This entry gives the required ages for voluntary or conscript military service and the length of service obligation.
  • NATO > NATO reserves provided: Reserve personnel.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Navy > Aircraft carriers: Number of aircraft carriers.
  • Navy > Aircraft carriers per million people: Number of aircraft carriers. Figures expressed per million people for the same year.
  • Navy > Amphibious warfare ships: Number of amphibious warfare ships.
  • Navy > Attack subs: Attack sub.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Navy > Frigates: Number of frigates.
  • Navy > Patrol boats: Number of patrol boats (Includes minesweepers).
  • Navy > Submarines: Number of patrol boats (includes minesweepers).
  • Navy > Submarines per million people: Number of patrol boats (includes minesweepers). Figures expressed per million people for the same year.
  • Nuclear weapons > Non-Proliferation treaty sign date: Signed.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Paramilitary personnel: Paramilitary.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Personnel: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organization, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces.
  • Personnel > Per capita: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organization, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Personnel per 1000: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organization, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Service age and obligation: This entry gives the required ages for voluntary or conscript military service and the length of sevice obligation.
  • War deaths: Battle-related deaths are deaths in battle-related conflicts between warring parties in the conflict dyad (two conflict units that are parties to a conflict). Typically, battle-related deaths occur in warfare involving the armed forces of the warring parties. This includes traditional battlefield fighting, guerrilla activities, and all kinds of bombardments of military units, cities, and villages, etc. The targets are usually the military itself and its installations or state institutions and state representatives, but there is often substantial collateral damage in the form of civilians being killed in crossfire, in indiscriminate bombings, etc. All deaths--military as well as civilian--incurred in such situations, are counted as battle-related deaths."
STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Active Ground Forces > Active Personnel > 2008 177,600 2008 4th out of 20
Active military personnel 109,070 2012 6th out of 26
Active military personnel per thousand people 9.67 2012 2nd out of 26
Air force > Combat aircraft 308 1999 1st out of 11
Air force > Combat aircraft per million people 28.3 1999 1st out of 11
Air force > F-16 fighers 157 2013 1st out of 6
Air force > Mirage aircraft 44 2000 2nd out of 2
Air force > Mirage aircraft per million people 4.03 2000 1st out of 2
Air force > United States air force deployments 21 2014 23th out of 26
Armed forces growth -21% 2000 91st out of 132
Armed forces personnel 159,000 2000 31st out of 166
Armed forces personnel > Total 161,000 2008 35th out of 160
Armed forces personnel per 1000 14.56 2000 13th out of 166
Arms trade > Arms imports, top countries 703 2010 9th out of 15
Army > Attack helicopters 29 2013 4th out of 11
Army > Attack helicopters per million people 2.66 1999 2nd out of 5
Army > Main battle tanks 1,244 2013 1st out of 21
Army > Main battle tanks per million people 116.52 1999 2nd out of 10
Army > Mortars 3,371 2013 1st out of 23
Army > Multiple rocket launchers 152 2013 5th out of 10
Army > Self-propelled guns 587 2013 1st out of 16
Army > Towed artillery units 729 2013 1st out of 18
Army > Troops prepared for deployed and sustained operation 2,552 2012 6th out of 19
Army > Troops prepared for deployed operations 22,180 2012 4th out of 22
Army > United States army deployments 9 2014 20th out of 26
Branches Hellenic Army (Ellinikos Stratos, ES), Hellenic Navy (Ellinikos Polemiko Navtiko, EPN), Hellenic Air Force (Elliniki Polimiki Aeroporia, EPA) 2008
Budget 10.39 US$ BN 1999 2nd out of 11
Budget per million people 0.955 US$ BN 1999 1st out of 11
Conscription Conscription exists (AI). 1997
Defence spending > Percent of GDP 3.3% 2009 1st out of 27
Expenditure > Current LCU 8120000000 2005
Expenditures > Dollar figure $5.89 billion 2004 7th out of 86
Expenditures > Dollar figure per capita $532.47 2004 7th out of 85
Expenditures > Percent of GDP 4.3% 2005 20th out of 153
Global Peace Index 1.96 2013 5th out of 33
Gulf War Coalition Forces 200 1991 26th out of 30
Imports > USD 518 million 2008 18th out of 86
Manpower > Reaching military age annually > Males 53,858 2008 108th out of 224
Manpower available for military service > Males age 16-49 2013 74th out of 161
Manpower fit for military service > Males age 16-49 2013 74th out of 225
Manpower reaching military age annually > Males 52,754 2012 105th out of 224
Military branches Hellenic Army (Ellinikos Stratos, ES), Hellenic Navy (Elliniko Polemiko Navtiko, EPN), Hellenic Air Force (Elliniki Polemiki Aeroporia, EPA) 2013
Military expenditure > Current LCU 9.47 billion 2009 65th out of 116
Military expenditures 4.3% of GDP 2005 5th out of 40
Military service age and obligation 19-45 years of age for compulsory military service; during wartime the law allows for recruitment beginning January of the year of inductee's 18th birthday, thus including 17 year olds; 18 years of age for volunteers; conscript service obligation is 1 year for all services; women are eligible for voluntary military service 2012
NATO > NATO reserves provided 280,000 2014 8th out of 26
Navy > Aircraft carriers 0.0 1999 4th out of 11
Navy > Aircraft carriers per million people 0.0 1999 4th out of 11
Navy > Amphibious warfare ships 15 1999 1st out of 3
Navy > Attack subs 8 2011 1st out of 9
Navy > Frigates 13 2011 2nd out of 10
Navy > Patrol boats 26 2011 1st out of 13
Navy > Submarines 11 1999 1st out of 8
Navy > Submarines per million people 1.01 1999 1st out of 8
Nuclear weapons > Non-Proliferation treaty sign date 1 Jul 1968 (M, W) 2014
Paramilitary personnel 4,000 2012 1st out of 1
Personnel 168,000 2005 38th out of 160
Personnel > Per capita 15.13 per 1,000 people 2005 15th out of 160
Personnel per 1000 15.13 2005 15th out of 159
Service age and obligation 19-45 years of age for compulsory military service; during wartime the law allows for recruitment beginning January of the year of inductee's 18th birthday, thus including 17 year olds; 17 years of age for volunteers; conscript service obligation - 1 year for all services; women are eligible for voluntary military service 2008
War deaths 0.0 2008 124th out of 195
Weapon holdings 5.49 million 2001 16th out of 137

SOURCES: Various sources compiled into Wikipedia's Military of the European Union; Wikipedia: Military of the European Union (The table) ("The 15 countries with the highest military expenditure in 2012 (table)" (PDF). Stockholm International Peace Research Institute . Retrieved 15 April 2013 .); Wikipedia: Military of the European Union (The table) ("The 15 countries with the highest military expenditure in 2012 (table)" (PDF). Stockholm International Peace Research Institute . Retrieved 15 April 2013 .). Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; Wikipedia: List of countries by level of military equipment (List); Wikipedia: List of countries by level of military equipment (List). Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; Wikipedia: Military of the European Union (The table); Wikipedia: Military of the European Union (The table). Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; Wikipedia: United States military deployments (Combat zones); calculated on the basis of data on armed forces from IISS (International Institute for Strategic Studies). 2001. The Military Balance 2001-2002. Oxford: Oxford University Press; IISS (International Institute for Strategic Studies). 2001. The Military Balance 2001-2002. Oxford: Oxford University Press; International Institute for Strategic Studies, The Military Balance.; IISS (International Institute for Strategic Studies). 2001. The Military Balance 2001-2002. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arms_industry#World.27s_largest_arms_importers
http://www.sipri.org/googlemaps/2013_of_at_top_20_imp_map.html
, The Top 20 Arms Importers, 2008 –2012; All CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 18 December 2008; Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Geneva, Switzerland, 1997. Data collected from the nations concerned, unless otherwise indicated. Acronyms: Amnesty International (AI); European Council of Conscripts Organizations (ECCO); Friends World Committee for Consultation (FWCC); International Helsinki Federation for Human Rights (IHFHR); National Interreligious Service Board for Conscientious Objectors (NISBCO); Service, Peace and Justice in Latin America (SERPAJ); War Resisters International (WRI); World Council of Churches (WCC); Stockholm International Peace Research Institute: The SIPRI Military Expenditure Database; World Development Indicators database; All CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 18 December 2008. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; http://www.visionofhumanity.org/#/page/indexes/global-peace-index, Global Rankings. Vision of Humanity.; "Gulf War Veterans: Measuring Health" by Lyla M. Hernandez, Jane S. Durch, Dan G. Blazer II, and Isabel V. Hoverman, Editors; Committee on Measuring the Health of Gulf War Veterans, Institute of Medicine. Published by The National Academies Press 1999; Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), Yearbook: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security.; CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; CIA World Factbooks 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013; Wikipedia: Member states of NATO (Military personnel); Wikipedia: List of parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (Ratified or acceded states); Wikipedia: List of countries by number of military and paramilitary personnel (The list); World Development Indicators database. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; Uppsala Conflict Data Program, http://www.pcr.uu.se/research/ucdp/.; Bonn International Center for Conversion (BICC)

Citation

6

Greece has pretty broad borders. The recent Greek history consists of a series of wars for freedom and national independence. Greeks faced multiple conflicts with the Ottomans during the last two centuries, and logically Turkey and Greece are fierce rivals. During the Second Balkan War, Greece faced Bulgaria. Finally, during the two World Wars, Greece faced multiple nations, including Albania, Italy, Germany and the newly established nation of Turkey. Obviously, Greece opposed all neighboring countries pretty recently. The wounds of the past are recent, and this keeps the Greek army on alert.

National defense is important to Greece and statistical facts prove the same. Greece has one of the most equipped armies in Europe, owning the most aircrafts per 1 million citizens (45.65 aircrafts per million people) and a respectable number of war tanks (154.55 tanks per million people), artillery units (171.2 artillery units per million people) and conventional weapons. According to 1990 stats, Greece imports conventional weapons that cost 1.43 billion, or 1.54% of GDP). Military equipment requires money, so Greek state spends lot of money. For example, 4.48% of Greek GDP was used for military expenditures in 2005.

Even with a well-equipped military, war conflicts still need manpower. For this reason, Greece is prepared. Men between 19-45 years are obliged to serve in the Greek army for a year. Almost 5 men out of 1,000 citizens recruit the new recruitment unit. Women can also serve in the Greek army if they wish. Greece has in total 15.13 soldiers per 1,000 people.

The three branches of Greek army are: Hellenic Army (Ellinikos Stratos, ES), Hellenic Navy (Elliniko Polemiko Navtiko, EPN), Hellenic Air Force (Elliniki Polemiki Aeroporia, EPA). Greece is also part of the NATO alliance. For this reason, Greece has offered military help multiple times during regional conflicts. For example, the Greek Army was present in Iraq and Serbia war conflicts.

Posted on 09 Apr 2014

Luke.Metcalfe

Luke.Metcalfe

137 Stat enthusiast