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Brazil

Brazil Government Stats

Author: chris.lockyer781

Author: chris.lockyer781

Brazil has a bicameral governing body made up of the Federal Senate (Upper Chamber) and Lower Chamber of Deputies. The nation’s president is elected to a four-year term. He or she is eligible to serve for one more tenure. There are 81 senators who are elected for eight years while the 513 deputies are elected for only four years. The country is divided into 26 states and one federal district (Brasília) with each state having a governor and legislature.

Brazil has always been acknowledged as one of the leaders in the inter-American community. The nation played a vital role in combined security initiatives and economic collaboration in the Western Hemisphere. It belongs to the Organization of American States and part of the Inter-American Treaty of Reciprocal Assistance (Rio Treaty). Brazil has focused on expanding relationships with its South American neighbors. In fact, it is a founding member of the Latin American Integration Association and the Union of South American Nations composed of Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, Chile, Bolivia, Peru, Colombia, and Ecuador.

Definitions

  • Administrative divisions: This entry generally gives the numbers, designatory terms, and first-order administrative divisions as approved by the US Board on Geographic Names (BGN). Changes that have been reported but not yet acted on by BGN are noted.
  • Capital > Geographic coordinates: This entry is derived from Government > Capital, which gives the name of the seat of government, its geographic coordinates, the time difference relative to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) and the time observed in Washington, DC, and, if applicable, information on daylight saving time (DST). Where appropriate, a special note has been added to highlight those countries that have multiple time zones.
  • Capital > Name: This entry is derived from Government > Capital, which gives the name of the seat of government, its geographic coordinates, the time difference relative to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) and the time observed in Washington, DC, and, if applicable, information on daylight saving time (DST). Where appropriate, a special note has been added to highlight those countries that have multiple time zones.
  • Capital > Time difference: This entry is derived from Government > Capital, which gives the name of the seat of government, its geographic coordinates, the time difference relative to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) and the time observed in Washington, DC, and, if applicable, information on daylight saving time (DST). Where appropriate, a special note has been added to highlight those countries that have multiple time zones.
  • Capital city > Geographic coordinates: This entry gives the name of the seat of government, its geographic coordinates, the time difference relative to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) and the time observed in Washington, DC, and, if applicable, information on daylight saving time (DST). Where appropriate, a special note has been added to highlight those countries that have multiple time zones.
  • Constitution: The dates of adoption, revisions, and major amendments to a nation's constitution
  • Country name > Conventional long form: This entry is derived from Government > Country name, which includes all forms of the country's name approved by the US Board on Geographic Names (Italy is used as an example): conventional long form (Italian Republic), conventional short form (Italy), local long form (Repubblica Italiana), local short form (Italia), former (Kingdom of Italy), as well as the abbreviation. Also see the Terminology note.
  • Country name > Conventional short form: This entry is derived from Government > Country name, which includes all forms of the country's name approved by the US Board on Geographic Names (Italy is used as an example): conventional long form (Italian Republic), conventional short form (Italy), local long form (Repubblica Italiana), local short form (Italia), former (Kingdom of Italy), as well as the abbreviation. Also see the Terminology note.
  • Diplomatic representation in the US > Telephone: This entry includes the chief of mission, chancery, telephone, FAX, consulate general locations, and consulate locations.
  • Judicial branch > Judge selection and term of office: This entry is derived from Government > Judicial branch, which includes three subfields. The highest court(s) subfield includes the name(s) of a country's highest level court(s), the number and titles of the judges, and the types of cases heard by the court, which commonly are based on civil, criminal, administrative, and constitutional law. A number of countries have separate constitutional courts. The judge selection and term of office subfield includes the organizations and associated officials responsible for nominating and appointing judges, and a brief description of the process. The selection process can be indicative of the independence of a country's court system from other branches of its government. Also included in this subfield are judges' tenures, which can range from a few years, to a specified retirement age, to lifelong appointments. The subordinate courts subfield lists the courts lower in the hierarchy of a country's court system. A few countries with federal-style governments, such as Brazil, Canada, and the US, in addition to their federal court, have separate state- or province-level court systems, though generally the two systems interact.
  • Judicial branch > Subordinate courts: This entry is derived from Government > Judicial branch, which includes three subfields. The highest court(s) subfield includes the name(s) of a country's highest level court(s), the number and titles of the judges, and the types of cases heard by the court, which commonly are based on civil, criminal, administrative, and constitutional law. A number of countries have separate constitutional courts. The judge selection and term of office subfield includes the organizations and associated officials responsible for nominating and appointing judges, and a brief description of the process. The selection process can be indicative of the independence of a country's court system from other branches of its government. Also included in this subfield are judges' tenures, which can range from a few years, to a specified retirement age, to lifelong appointments. The subordinate courts subfield lists the courts lower in the hierarchy of a country's court system. A few countries with federal-style governments, such as Brazil, Canada, and the US, in addition to their federal court, have separate state- or province-level court systems, though generally the two systems interact.
  • Legal system: A brief description of the legal system's historical roots, role in government, and acceptance of International Court of Justice (ICJ) jurisdiction.
  • Legislative branch: This entry contains information on the structure (unicameral, bicameral, tricameral), formal name, number of seats, and term of office. Elections includes the nature of election process or accession to power, date of the last election, and date of the next election. Election results includes the percent of vote and/or number of seats held by each party in the last election.
  • Suffrage: The age at enfranchisement and whether the right to vote is universal or restricted
  • Transnational Issues > Disputes > International: This entry includes a wide variety of situations that range from traditional bilateral boundary disputes to unilateral claims of one sort or another. Information regarding disputes over international terrestrial and maritime boundaries has been reviewed by the US Department of State. References to other situations involving borders or frontiers may also be included, such as resource disputes, geopolitical questions, or irredentist issues; however, inclusion does not necessarily constitute official acceptance or recognition by the US Government.
STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Administrative divisions 26 states (estados, singular - estado) and 1 federal district* (distrito federal); Acre, Alagoas, Amapa, Amazonas, Bahia, Ceara, Distrito Federal*, Espirito Santo, Goias, Maranhao, Mato Grosso, Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais, Para, Paraiba, Parana, Pernambuco, Piaui, Rio de Janeiro, Rio Grande do Norte, Rio Grande do Sul, Rondonia, Roraima, Santa Catarina, Sao Paulo, Sergipe, Tocantins 2013
Capital > Geographic coordinates 15 47 S, 47 55 W 2013
Capital > Name Brasilia 2013
Capital > Time difference UTC-3 (2 hours ahead of Washington, DC during Standard Time) 2013
Capital city > Geographic coordinates 15 47 S, 47 55 W 2008
Constitution several previous; latest ratified 5 October 1988; amended many times, last in 2012 2012
Country name > Conventional long form Federative Republic of Brazil 2013
Country name > Conventional short form Brazil 2013
Diplomatic representation in the US > Telephone [1] (202) 238-2805 2013
Judicial branch > Judge selection and term of office justices appointed by the president and approved by the Federal Senate; justices appointed to serve until mandatory retirement at age 70 2013
Judicial branch > Subordinate courts Federal Appeals Court, Superior Court of Justice, Superior Electoral Court, regional federal courts; state court system 2013
Legal system civil law 2013
Legislative branch bicameral National Congress or Congresso Nacional consists of the Federal Senate or Senado Federal (81 seats; 3 members from each state and federal district elected according to the principle of majority to serve eight-year terms; one-third and two-thirds elected every four years, alternately) and the Chamber of Deputies or Camara dos Deputados (513 seats; members are elected by proportional representation to serve four-year terms) 2008
Suffrage voluntary between 16 to under 18 years of age and over 70; compulsory 18 to 70 years of age 2013
Transnational Issues > Disputes > International uncontested boundary dispute between Brazil and Uruguay over Braziliera/Brasiliera Island in the Quarai/Cuareim River leaves the tripoint with Argentina in question; smuggling of firearms and narcotics continues to be an issue along the Uruguay-Brazil border; Colombian-organized illegal narcotics and paramilitary activities penetrate Brazil's border region with Venezuela 2013

SOURCES: CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; CIA World Factbooks 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013; All CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 18 December 2008

Citation

"Brazil Government Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/Brazil/Government

2

Brazil has a bicameral governing body made up of the Federal Senate (Upper Chamber) and Lower Chamber of Deputies. The nation’s president is elected to a four-year term. He or she is eligible to serve for one more tenure. There are 81 senators who are elected for eight years while the 513 deputies are elected for only four years. The country is divided into 26 states and one federal district (Brasília) with each state having a governor and legislature.

Brazil has always been acknowledged as one of the leaders in the inter-American community. The nation played a vital role in combined security initiatives and economic collaboration in the Western Hemisphere. It belongs to the Organization of American States and part of the Inter-American Treaty of Reciprocal Assistance (Rio Treaty). Brazil has focused on expanding relationships with its South American neighbors. In fact, it is a founding member of the Latin American Integration Association and the Union of South American Nations composed of Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, Paraguay, Chile, Bolivia, Peru, Colombia, and Ecuador.

Posted on 09 Apr 2014

chris.lockyer781

chris.lockyer781

378

1

The Brazil government is legally identified as the Union. Essentially, the federal government of the country is so designed to allow for the establishment of semi-autonomous states or federating units. The said federating units, 25 in all plus one federal district of Brasilia, are led by a Governor who possesses significant administrative power over his or her state. However, the president of the country can intervene in any state affair when the necessity for the said interference is conspicuous. While there is some degree of autonomy, the Union still has the initiative of power and resources.

Brazil is a democratic country headed by a President who is elected to power by popular vote. The current president of the country is Dilma Rousseff. She has been in office for 2011, which means her leadership will end in 2015. However, the Constitution provides that the incumbent president can run for the same position twice, thus limiting presidential terms to a maximum of 8 years.

As in the United States and many other countries, the government is divided to three branches. The Executive branch includes the President, her Vice President, and the members of her Cabinet. The Legislative branch is made up of two branches, the Federal Senate and the Chamber of Deputies. Members of the bicameral congress do not have limits to the number of terms with which they can serve as members. The Judicial branch is made up of two major divisions, each with critical subdivisions. There is the federal judicial branch and the superior courts.

Posted on 06 Apr 2014

Edsel.G

Edsel.G

246

0

Quem colocou estas informações referente ao Brasil deveria se informar melhor. O Brasil não participa de uma Guerra há mais de 150 anos.

Posted on 29 Jul 2010

Thiago

Thiago

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