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Health > Heart disease deaths: Countries Compared

chris.lockyer781

Author: chris.lockyer781

Cardiovascular disease is a group of conditions that affect the heart and the blood vessels. In adults, atherosclerosis or buildup of fatty plaques in the arteries is the most common cause of cardiovascular disease. The major risk factors for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases include smoking, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and high blood sugar. Physical inactivity, advancing age and family history also increase the risk for this disease. Women have a slightly lower risk of cardiovascular disease than men, but the risk rises shortly after menopause.

Annually, there are more people who die from cardiovascular diseases than from any cause. Deaths in low and middle income nations account for 80% of these. This is attributed to higher tobacco use, limited primary prevention programs and poor health care services in these countries.

Compared to higher income countries, those who die from CVDs in lower income countries are younger. In developing countries, as much as 46.7% of CVD deaths occur below the age of 70 years, compared to 26.5% in developed countries.

Cardiovascular disease has a huge impact on the economy of both developing and developed nations. In the United States, the annual spending for this disease is estimated at $444 billion. As its population ages, a greater economic impact is expected. In developing countries, cardiovascular disease was shown to decrease the annual GDP by up to 6.7%, due to deaths of people in the workforce.

Lifestyle changes such as smoking cessation, salt reduction, eating a healthy diet and regular exercise have been shown to decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease. Prevention of comorbidities such as hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia also lower its risk. In countries where CVD has declined, it was observed that reduction in risk factors such as smoking decreases CVD mortality by 40%, while treatment including medications for dyslipidemia decreases it by 60%.

Citations:

1) Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Disease. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK45688/

2) Reddy KS, Yusuf S. Emerging epidemic of cardiovascular disease in developing countries. Circulation. 1998; 97: 596-601.

3) CDC: Heart Disease and stroke Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/publications/aag/dhdsp.htm

4) WHO: Cardiovascular disease. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs317/en/

DEFINITION: Heart disease deaths per 100000 population (1995-1998).

CONTENTS

# COUNTRY AMOUNT DATE GRAPH
1 Slovakia 216 per 100,000 people 1998
2 Hungary 192.1 per 100,000 people 1998
3 Ireland 152.6 per 100,000 people 1998
4 Czech Republic 148.6 per 100,000 people 1998
5 Finland 143.8 per 100,000 people 1998
6 New Zealand 127.3 per 100,000 people 1998
7 United Kingdom 122 per 100,000 people 1998
8 Iceland 115.4 per 100,000 people 1998
9 Norway 112.5 per 100,000 people 1998
10 Australia 110.9 per 100,000 people 1998
11 Sweden 110.1 per 100,000 people 1998
12 Austria 109.3 per 100,000 people 1998
13 United States 106.5 per 100,000 people 1998
14 Germany 106.1 per 100,000 people 1998
15 Denmark 105.4 per 100,000 people 1998
High income OECD countries average (profile) 99.38 per 100,000 people 1998
16 Canada 94.9 per 100,000 people 1998
17 Poland 80.9 per 100,000 people 1998
Group of 7 countries (G7) average (profile) 80.64 per 100,000 people 1998
18 Netherlands 75.1 per 100,000 people 1998
19 Luxembourg 68.9 per 100,000 people 1998
20 Greece 68.8 per 100,000 people 1998
21 Italy 65.2 per 100,000 people 1998
22 Belgium 64.6 per 100,000 people 1998
23 Portugal 55.9 per 100,000 people 1998
24 Spain 53.8 per 100,000 people 1998
25 France 39.8 per 100,000 people 1998
26 Japan 30 per 100,000 people 1998

Citation

"Countries Compared by Health > Heart disease deaths. International Statistics at NationMaster.com", World Health Organization. Aggregates compiled by NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/stats/Health/Heart-disease-deaths

Health > Heart disease deaths: Countries Compared Map

NationMaster

Interesting observations about Health > Heart disease deaths

All of the top 2 countries by heart disease deaths are Landlocked.
All of the bottom 24 countries by heart disease deaths are High income OECD.
United Kingdom ranked first for heart disease deaths amongst Group of 7 countries (G7) in 1998.
All of the top 3 countries by heart disease deaths are Christian.
All of the top 2 countries by heart disease deaths are Eastern European.
Slovakia ranked first for heart disease deaths amongst European Union in 1998.
All of the top 5 countries by heart disease deaths are Cold countries'.
All of the top 4 countries by heart disease deaths are European.
12 of the bottom 13 countries by heart disease deaths are NATO.
France ranked last for heart disease deaths amongst Eurozone in 1998.

3

Cardiovascular disease is a group of conditions that affect the heart and the blood vessels. In adults, atherosclerosis or buildup of fatty plaques in the arteries is the most common cause of cardiovascular disease. The major risk factors for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases include smoking, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and high blood sugar. Physical inactivity, advancing age and family history also increase the risk for this disease. Women have a slightly lower risk of cardiovascular disease than men, but the risk rises shortly after menopause.

Annually, there are more people who die from cardiovascular diseases than from any cause. Deaths in low and middle income nations account for 80% of these. This is attributed to higher tobacco use, limited primary prevention programs and poor health care services in these countries.

Compared to higher income countries, those who die from CVDs in lower income countries are younger. In developing countries, as much as 46.7% of CVD deaths occur below the age of 70 years, compared to 26.5% in developed countries.

Cardiovascular disease has a huge impact on the economy of both developing and developed nations. In the United States, the annual spending for this disease is estimated at $444 billion. As its population ages, a greater economic impact is expected. In developing countries, cardiovascular disease was shown to decrease the annual GDP by up to 6.7%, due to deaths of people in the workforce.

Lifestyle changes such as smoking cessation, salt reduction, eating a healthy diet and regular exercise have been shown to decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease. Prevention of comorbidities such as hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia also lower its risk. In countries where CVD has declined, it was observed that reduction in risk factors such as smoking decreases CVD mortality by 40%, while treatment including medications for dyslipidemia decreases it by 60%.

Citations:

1) Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Disease. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK45688/

2) Reddy KS, Yusuf S. Emerging epidemic of cardiovascular disease in developing countries. Circulation. 1998; 97: 596-601.

3) CDC: Heart Disease and stroke Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/publications/aag/dhdsp.htm

4) WHO: Cardiovascular disease. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs317/en/

Posted on 09 Apr 2014

chris.lockyer781

chris.lockyer781

394 Stat enthusiast

0

Small amounts of THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, slowed the hardening of arteries in mice, according to a study in the latest issue of the journal Nature.

The mice in the study were fed a high-cholesterol diet for 11 weeks. Halfway through that period, some of the mice started receiving very small daily doses of THC. The mice that got THC had less blood vessel clogging than those that didn't.

The benefit came from THC’s effect on immune system cells. It reduced their secretion of an inflammation-promoting substance by binding to proteins called CB2 receptors, which are found mostly on immune-system cells. Related work showed that there was no additional benefit from receiving higher THC doses, like those a person would get from smoking marijuana.

In humans, hardening of the arteries and their inflammation sets the stage for heart attacks.

Posted on 08 Apr 2005

Ian Graham, Staff Editor

Ian Graham, Staff Editor

0

About China.

A study from 2007 (Cardiovascular diseases in China - Liu, Lisheng, 2007) pegged stroke at 40%. With an overall death rate of 703 per 100,000 (wikipedia: Demographics of the People's Republic of China), that amounts to about 280 per 100,000. I do not have chinese data about other heart diseases at hand.

So: China = 280 + some extra

Posted on 12 Jan 2012

Henk Poley

Henk Poley

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