×

Health Stats: compare key data on European Union & United States

Definitions

  • Death rates > Children under 5: Under-five mortality rate is the probability per 1,000 that a newborn baby will die before reaching age five, if subject to current age-specific mortality rates."
  • Death rates > Infants: Infant mortality rate is the number of infants dying before reaching one year of age, per 1,000 live births in a given year."
  • Death rates > Men: Adult mortality rate is the probability of dying between the ages of 15 and 60--that is, the probability of a 15-year-old dying before reaching age 60, if subject to current age-specific mortality rates between those ages."
  • Death rates > Women: Adult mortality rate is the probability of dying between the ages of 15 and 60--that is, the probability of a 15-year-old dying before reaching age 60, if subject to current age-specific mortality rates between those ages."
  • Health expenditure per capita > Current US$: Health expenditure per capita (current US$). Total health expenditure is the sum of public and private health expenditures as a ratio of total population. It covers the provision of health services (preventive and curative), family planning activities, nutrition activities, and emergency aid designated for health but does not include provision of water and sanitation. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Health services > Hospital beds > Per 1,000 people: Hospital beds include inpatient beds available in public, private, general, and specialized hospitals and rehabilitation centers. In most cases beds for both acute and chronic care are included."
  • Health services > Physicians > Per 1,000 people: Physicians include generalist and specialist medical practitioners.
  • Infant mortality rate > Total: This entry gives the number of deaths of infants under one year old in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year; included is the total death rate, and deaths by sex, male and female. This rate is often used as an indicator of the level of health in a country.
  • Life expectancy > Male: Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life.
  • Life expectancy at birth > Total population: The average number of years to be lived by a group of people born in the same year, if mortality at each age remains constant in the future. Life expectancy at birth is also a measure of overall quality of life in a country and summarizes the mortality at all ages. It can also be thought of as indicating the potential return on investment in human capital and is necessary for the calculation of various actuarial measures.
  • Life expectancy at birth, female > Years: Life expectancy at birth, female (years). Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life.
  • Life expectancy at birth, male > Years: Life expectancy at birth, male (years). Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life.
  • Life expectancy at birth, total > Years: Life expectancy at birth, total (years). Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life.
  • Nurses and midwives > Per 1,000 people: Nurses and midwives (per 1,000 people). Nurses and midwives include professional nurses, professional midwives, auxiliary nurses, auxiliary midwives, enrolled nurses, enrolled midwives and other associated personnel, such as dental nurses and primary care nurses.
  • Nutrition > Depth of hunger > Kilocalories per person per day: Depth of hunger or the intensity of food deprivation, indicates how much food-deprived people fall short of minimum food needs in terms of dietary energy. The food deficit, in kilocalories per person per day, is measured by comparing the average amount of dietary energy that undernourished people get from the foods they eat with the minimum amount of dietary energy they need to maintain body weight and undertake light activity. The depth of hunger is low when it is less than 200 kilocalories per person per day, and high when it is higher than 300 kilocalories per person per day."
  • Life expectancy at birth > Female: The average number of years to be lived by a females in this nation born in the same year, if mortality at each age remains constant in the future. Life expectancy at birth is also a measure of overall quality of life in a country and summarizes the mortality at all ages. It can also be thought of as indicating the potential return on investment in human capital and is necessary for the calculation of various actuarial measures.
  • Life expectancy > Female: Life expectancy at birth indicates the number of years a newborn infant would live if prevailing patterns of mortality at the time of its birth were to stay the same throughout its life.
  • Life expectancy at birth > Male: The average number of years to be lived by amen in this nation born in the same year, if mortality at each age remains constant in the future. The entry includes total population as well as the male and female components. Life expectancy at birth is also a measure of overall quality of life in a country and summarizes the mortality at all ages. It can also be thought of as indicating the potential return on investment in human capital and is necessary for the calculation of various actuarial measures.
  • Health services > Nurses and midwives > Per 1,000 people: Nurses and midwives include professional nurses, professional midwives, auxiliary nurses, auxiliary midwives, enrolled nurses, enrolled midwives and other associated personnel, such as dental nurses and primary care nurses."
  • Health spending per capita: Total health expenditure is the sum of public and private health expenditures as a ratio of total population. It covers the provision of health services (preventive and curative), family planning activities, nutrition activities, and emergency aid designated for health but does not include provision of water and sanitation. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • Survival rate > To age 65 > Men: Survival to age 65 refers to the percentage of a cohort of newborn infants that would survive to age 65, if subject to current age specific mortality rates."
  • Survival rate > To age 65 > Women: Survival to age 65 refers to the percentage of a cohort of newborn infants that would survive to age 65, if subject to current age specific mortality rates."
  • Health services > Health expenditure per capita > PPP > Constant 2005 international $: Total health expenditure is the sum of public and private health expenditures as a ratio of total population. It covers the provision of health services (preventive and curative), family planning activities, nutrition activities, and emergency aid designated for health but does not include provision of water and sanitation. Data are in international dollars converted using 2005 purchasing power parity (PPP) rates."
  • Health services > Outpatient visits per capita: Outpatient visits per capita are the number of visits to health care facilities per capita, including repeat visits."
  • Smoking rate > Women: Prevalence of smoking, female is the percentage of women ages 15 and over who smoke any form of tobacco, including cigarettes, cigars, and pipes, and excluding smokeless tobacco. Data include daily and non-daily smoking."
  • Infant mortality rate > Female: This entry gives the number of deaths of infants under one year old in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year; included is the total death rate, and deaths by sex, male and female. This rate is often used as an indicator of the level of health in a country.
  • Reproductive health > Maternal mortality ratio > Modeled estimate > Per 100,000 live births: Maternal mortality ratio is the number of women who die during pregnancy and childbirth, per 100,000 live births. The data are estimated with a regression model using information on fertility, birth attendants, and HIV prevalence."
  • Disease prevention > Tuberculosis case detection rate > All forms: Tuberculosis case detection rate (all forms) is the percentage of newly notified tuberculosis cases (including relapses) to estimated incident cases (case detection, all forms)."
  • Nutrition > Low-birthweight babies > % of births: Low-birthweight babies are newborns weighing less than 2,500 grams, with the measurement taken within the first hours of life, before significant postnatal weight loss has occurred."
  • Cause of death, by communicable diseases and maternal, prenatal and nutrition conditions > % of total: Cause of death, by communicable diseases and maternal, prenatal and nutrition conditions (% of total). Cause of death refers to the share of all deaths for all ages by underlying causes. Communicable diseases and maternal, prenatal and nutrition conditions include infectious and parasitic diseases, respiratory infections, and nutritional deficiencies such as underweight and stunting.
  • Nutrition > Prevalence of undernourishment > % of population: Population below minimum level of dietary energy consumption (also referred to as prevalence of undernourishment) shows the percentage of the population whose food intake is insufficient to meet dietary energy requirements continuously. Data showing as 2.5 signifies a prevalence of undernourishment below 2.5%.
  • Disease prevention > Improved sanitation facilities > Urban > % of urban population with access: Access to improved sanitation facilities refers to the percentage of the population with at least adequate access to excreta disposal facilities that can effectively prevent human, animal, and insect contact with excreta. Improved facilities range from simple but protected pit latrines to flush toilets with a sewerage connection. To be effective, facilities must be correctly constructed and properly maintained."
  • Disease prevention > Improved water source > % of population with access: Access to an improved water source refers to the percentage of the population with reasonable access to an adequate amount of water from an improved source, such as a household connection, public standpipe, borehole, protected well or spring, and rainwater collection. Unimproved sources include vendors, tanker trucks, and unprotected wells and springs. Reasonable access is defined as the availability of at least 20 liters a person a day from a source within one kilometer of the dwelling."
  • Disease prevention > Improved water source > Urban > % of urban population with access: Access to an improved water source refers to the percentage of the population with reasonable access to an adequate amount of water from an improved source, such as a household connection, public standpipe, borehole, protected well or spring, and rainwater collection. Unimproved sources include vendors, tanker trucks, and unprotected wells and springs. Reasonable access is defined as the availability of at least 20 liters a person a day from a source within one kilometer of the dwelling."
  • Diseases > Prevalence of anemia among children > % of children under 5: Prevalence of anemia among children (% of children under 5). Prevalence of anemia, children under age 5, is the percentage of children under age 5 whose hemoglobin level is less than 110 grams per liter at sea level.
  • Diseases > Cause of death, by non-communicable diseases > % of total: Cause of death, by non-communicable diseases (% of total). Cause of death refers to the share of all deaths for all ages by underlying causes. Non-communicable diseases include cancer, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, digestive diseases, skin diseases, musculoskeletal diseases, and congenital anomalies.
  • Health expenditure, public > % of government expenditure: Health expenditure, public (% of government expenditure). Public health expenditure consists of recurrent and capital spending from government (central and local) budgets, external borrowings and grants (including donations from international agencies and nongovernmental organizations), and social (or compulsory) health insurance funds.
  • Health expenditure, public > % of GDP: Health expenditure, public (% of GDP). Public health expenditure consists of recurrent and capital spending from government (central and local) budgets, external borrowings and grants (including donations from international agencies and nongovernmental organizations), and social (or compulsory) health insurance funds.
  • Disease prevention > Immunisation against tetanus > % of children ages 12-23 months: Child immunisation measures the percentage of children ages 12-23 months who received vaccinations before 12 months or at any time before the survey. A child is considered adequately immunized against diphtheria, pertussis (or whooping cough), and tetanus (DPT) after receiving three doses of vaccine."
  • Disease prevention > Immunisation > Measles > % of children ages 12-23 months: Child immunisation measures the percentage of children ages 12-23 months who received vaccinations before 12 months or at any time before the survey. A child is considered adequately immunized against measles after receiving one dose of vaccine.
  • Risk factors > Prevalence of HIV > Male > % ages 15-24: Prevalence of HIV is the percentage of people who are infected with HIV. Youth rates are as a percentage of the relevant age group.
  • Health services > Out-of-pocket health expenditure > % of private expenditure on health: Out of pocket expenditure is any direct outlay by households, including gratuities and in-kind payments, to health practitioners and suppliers of pharmaceuticals, therapeutic appliances, and other goods and services whose primary intent is to contribute to the restoration or enhancement of the health status of individuals or population groups. It is a part of private health expenditure."
  • Health spending > % of GDP: Total health expenditure is the sum of public and private health expenditure. It covers the provision of health services (preventive and curative), family planning activities, nutrition activities, and emergency aid designated for health but does not include provision of water and sanitation."
  • Disease prevention > Improved sanitation facilities > % of population with access: Access to improved sanitation facilities refers to the percentage of the population with at least adequate access to excreta disposal facilities that can effectively prevent human, animal, and insect contact with excreta. Improved facilities range from simple but protected pit latrines to flush toilets with a sewerage connection. To be effective, facilities must be correctly constructed and properly maintained."
  • Health services > External resources for health > % of total expenditure on health: External resources for health are funds or services in kind that are provided by entities not part of the country in question. The resources may come from international organisations, other countries through bilateral arrangements, or foreign nongovernmental organisations. These resources are part of total health expenditure."
  • Cause of death, by injury > % of total: Cause of death, by injury (% of total). Cause of death refers to the share of all deaths for all ages by underlying causes. Injuries include unintentional and intentional injuries.
  • Private health spending > % of GDP: Private health expenditure includes direct household (out-of-pocket) spending, private insurance, charitable donations, and direct service payments by private corporations."
  • Public health spending > % of government spending: Public health expenditure consists of recurrent and capital spending from government (central and local) budgets, external borrowings and grants (including donations from international agencies and nongovernmental organisations), and social (or compulsory) health insurance funds."
  • Infant mortality rate > Male: This entry gives the number of deaths of infants under one year old in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year; included is the total death rate, and deaths by sex, male and female. This rate is often used as an indicator of the level of health in a country.
  • Public health spending > % of total health spending: Public health expenditure consists of recurrent and capital spending from government (central and local) budgets, external borrowings and grants (including donations from international agencies and nongovernmental organisations), and social (or compulsory) health insurance funds. Total health expenditure is the sum of public and private health expenditure. It covers the provision of health services (preventive and curative), family planning activities, nutrition activities, and emergency aid designated for health but does not include provision of water and sanitation."
  • Diseases > Diabetes > Prevalence > % of population ages 20 to 79: Diabetes prevalence (% of population ages 20 to 79). Diabetes prevalence refers to the percentage of people ages 20-79 who have type 1 or type 2 diabetes.
  • Immunisation > Immunization, DPT > % of children ages 12-23 months: Immunization, DPT (% of children ages 12-23 months). Child immunization measures the percentage of children ages 12-23 months who received vaccinations before 12 months or at any time before the survey. A child is considered adequately immunized against diphtheria, pertussis (or whooping cough), and tetanus (DPT) after receiving three doses of vaccine.
  • Immunisation > Immunization, measles > % of children ages 12-23 months: Immunization, measles (% of children ages 12-23 months). Child immunization measures the percentage of children ages 12-23 months who received vaccinations before 12 months or at any time before the survey. A child is considered adequately immunized against measles after receiving one dose of vaccine.
  • Out-of-pocket health expenditure > % of total expenditure on health: Out-of-pocket health expenditure (% of total expenditure on health). Out of pocket expenditure is any direct outlay by households, including gratuities and in-kind payments, to health practitioners and suppliers of pharmaceuticals, therapeutic appliances, and other goods and services whose primary intent is to contribute to the restoration or enhancement of the health status of individuals or population groups. It is a part of private health expenditure.
  • Health expenditure, private > % of GDP: Health expenditure, private (% of GDP). Private health expenditure includes direct household (out-of-pocket) spending, private insurance, charitable donations, and direct service payments by private corporations.
  • Disease prevention > Improved sanitation facilities > Rural > % of rural population with access: Access to improved sanitation facilities refers to the percentage of the population with at least adequate access to excreta disposal facilities that can effectively prevent human, animal, and insect contact with excreta. Improved facilities range from simple but protected pit latrines to flush toilets with a sewerage connection. To be effective, facilities must be correctly constructed and properly maintained."
  • Risk factors > Female adults with HIV > % of population ages 15+ with HIV: Prevalence of HIV is the percentage of people who are infected with HIV. Female rate is as a percentage of the total population with HIV.
  • Risk factors > Prevalence of HIV > Female > % ages 15-24: Prevalence of HIV is the percentage of people who are infected with HIV. Youth rates are as a percentage of the relevant age group.
  • Risk factors > Incidence of tuberculosis > Per 100,000 people: Incidence of tuberculosis is the estimated number of new pulmonary, smear positive, and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis cases."
  • Risk factors > Prevalence of HIV > Total > % of population ages 15-49: Prevalence of HIV refers to the percentage of people ages 15-49 who are infected with HIV.
  • Public health spending > % of GDP: Public health expenditure consists of recurrent and capital spending from government (central and local) budgets, external borrowings and grants (including donations from international agencies and nongovernmental organisations), and social (or compulsory) health insurance funds."
STAT European Union United States HISTORY
Death rates > Children under 5 4.93
Ranked 156th.
7.8
Ranked 139th. 58% more than European Union

Death rates > Infants 4.11
Ranked 156th.
6.8
Ranked 139th. 65% more than European Union

Death rates > Men 127.05
Ranked 140th.
141.23
Ranked 129th. 11% more than European Union

Death rates > Women 60.13
Ranked 151st.
81.46
Ranked 121st. 35% more than European Union

Health expenditure per capita > Current US$ $3,530.23
Ranked 21st.
$8,607.88
Ranked 4th. 2 times more than European Union

Health services > Hospital beds > Per 1,000 people 6.07
Ranked 23th. 96% more than United States
3.1
Ranked 37th.

Health services > Physicians > Per 1,000 people 3.3
Ranked 23th. 24% more than United States
2.67
Ranked 13th.

Infant mortality rate > Total 5.61 deaths/1,000 live births
Ranked 1st.
6.06 deaths/1,000 live births
Ranked 171st. 8% more than European Union

Life expectancy > Male 76.55
Ranked 28th. 1% more than United States
76
Ranked 34th.

Life expectancy at birth > Total population 78.82 years
Ranked 1st. 1% more than United States
78.37 years
Ranked 47th.

Life expectancy at birth, female > Years 83.09
Ranked 27th. 2% more than United States
81.1
Ranked 43th.

Life expectancy at birth, male > Years 77.42
Ranked 34th. 1% more than United States
76.3
Ranked 42nd.

Life expectancy at birth, total > Years 80.18
Ranked 29th. 2% more than United States
78.64
Ranked 40th.

Nurses and midwives > Per 1,000 people 6.37
Ranked 6th.
9.81
Ranked 14th. 54% more than European Union

Nutrition > Depth of hunger > Kilocalories per person per day 124.58
Ranked 131st. 25% more than United States
100
Ranked 147th.

Life expectancy at birth > Female 82.13 years
Ranked 1st. 1% more than United States
80.93 years
Ranked 52nd.

Life expectancy > Female 82.53
Ranked 21st. 2% more than United States
81
Ranked 34th.

Life expectancy at birth > Male 75.7 years
Ranked 1st.
75.92 years
Ranked 44th. About the same as European Union

Health services > Nurses and midwives > Per 1,000 people 7.56
Ranked 21st.
9.81
Ranked 3rd. 30% more than European Union

Health spending per capita 3,176.29
Ranked 20th.
7,284.7
Ranked 4th. 2 times more than European Union

Survival rate > To age 65 > Men 82.29
Ranked 34th.
83.35
Ranked 27th. 1% more than European Union

Survival rate > To age 65 > Women 91.44
Ranked 24th. 3% more than United States
88.79
Ranked 42nd.

Health services > Health expenditure per capita > PPP > Constant 2005 international $ $2,756.41
Ranked 23th.
$7,289.82
Ranked 1st. 3 times more than European Union

Health services > Outpatient visits per capita 6.46
Ranked 19th.
9
Ranked 7th. 39% more than European Union

Smoking rate > Women 26.63
Ranked 24th. 40% more than United States
19
Ranked 47th.
Infant mortality rate > Female 4.93 deaths/1,000 live births
Ranked 1st.
5.37 deaths/1,000 live births
Ranked 171st. 9% more than European Union

Reproductive health > Maternal mortality ratio > Modeled estimate > Per 100,000 live births 8.53
Ranked 142nd.
24
Ranked 116th. 3 times more than European Union

Disease prevention > Tuberculosis case detection rate > All forms 82.73%
Ranked 87th.
86.96%
Ranked 50th. 5% more than European Union

Nutrition > Low-birthweight babies > % of births 6.77%
Ranked 50th.
7.8%
Ranked 12th. 15% more than European Union

Cause of death, by communicable diseases and maternal, prenatal and nutrition conditions > % of total 5.04%
Ranked 162nd.
6.05%
Ranked 149th. 20% more than European Union
Nutrition > Prevalence of undernourishment > % of population 5.08%
Ranked 91st. 2% more than United States
5%
Ranked 116th.

Disease prevention > Improved sanitation facilities > Urban > % of urban population with access 99.13%
Ranked 42nd.
100%
Ranked 13th. 1% more than European Union

Disease prevention > Improved water source > % of population with access 99.96%
Ranked 44th. 1% more than United States
99%
Ranked 48th.

Disease prevention > Improved water source > Urban > % of urban population with access 99.98%
Ranked 55th.
100%
Ranked 18th. The same as European Union

Diseases > Prevalence of anemia among children > % of children under 5 13.37%
Ranked 11th. 10 times more than United States
1.3%
Ranked 10th.
Diseases > Cause of death, by non-communicable diseases > % of total 90.03%
Ranked 22nd. 4% more than United States
86.57%
Ranked 46th.
Health expenditure, public > % of government expenditure 15.85%
Ranked 37th.
19.8%
Ranked 12th. 25% more than European Union

Health expenditure, public > % of GDP 7.82%
Ranked 18th.
8.2%
Ranked 12th. 5% more than European Union

Disease prevention > Immunisation against tetanus > % of children ages 12-23 months 95.94%
Ranked 71st. 1% more than United States
95%
Ranked 76th.

Disease prevention > Immunisation > Measles > % of children ages 12-23 months 93.21%
Ranked 87th. 1% more than United States
92%
Ranked 92nd.

Risk factors > Prevalence of HIV > Male > % ages 15-24 0.27%
Ranked 86th.
0.7%
Ranked 39th. 3 times more than European Union
Health services > Out-of-pocket health expenditure > % of private expenditure on health 63.21%
Ranked 141st. 3 times more than United States
22.59%
Ranked 179th.

Health spending > % of GDP 9.27%
Ranked 28th.
15.68%
Ranked 2nd. 69% more than European Union

Disease prevention > Improved sanitation facilities > % of population with access 97.49%
Ranked 47th.
100%
Ranked 13th. 3% more than European Union

Health services > External resources for health > % of total expenditure on health 0.01%
Ranked 129th.
0.0
Ranked 147th.

Cause of death, by injury > % of total 4.93%
Ranked 158th.
7.38%
Ranked 93th. 50% more than European Union
Private health spending > % of GDP 2.09%
Ranked 105th.
8.54%
Ranked 2nd. 4 times more than European Union

Public health spending > % of government spending 15.72%
Ranked 29th.
19.45%
Ranked 6th. 24% more than European Union

Infant mortality rate > Male 6.26 deaths/1,000 live births
Ranked 1st.
6.72 deaths/1,000 live births
Ranked 169th. 7% more than European Union

Public health spending > % of total health spending 77.41%
Ranked 37th. 70% more than United States
45.54%
Ranked 139th.

Diseases > Diabetes > Prevalence > % of population ages 20 to 79 6.22%
Ranked 124th.
9.35%
Ranked 60th. 50% more than European Union
Immunisation > Immunization, DPT > % of children ages 12-23 months 96.5%
Ranked 65th. 2% more than United States
95%
Ranked 85th.

Immunisation > Immunization, measles > % of children ages 12-23 months 93.91%
Ranked 93th. 2% more than United States
92%
Ranked 107th.

Out-of-pocket health expenditure > % of total expenditure on health 13.96%
Ranked 155th. 24% more than United States
11.29%
Ranked 169th.

Health expenditure, private > % of GDP 2.33%
Ranked 104th.
9.65%
Ranked 3rd. 4 times more than European Union

Disease prevention > Improved sanitation facilities > Rural > % of rural population with access 92.78%
Ranked 62nd.
99%
Ranked 32nd. 7% more than European Union

Risk factors > Female adults with HIV > % of population ages 15+ with HIV 29.1%
Ranked 75th. 39% more than United States
20.91%
Ranked 125th.

Risk factors > Prevalence of HIV > Female > % ages 15-24 0.15%
Ranked 85th.
0.3%
Ranked 65th. Twice as much as European Union
Risk factors > Incidence of tuberculosis > Per 100,000 people 16.76
Ranked 139th. 4 times more than United States
4.76
Ranked 179th.

Risk factors > Prevalence of HIV > Total > % of population ages 15-49 0.25%
Ranked 87th.
0.6%
Ranked 65th. 2 times more than European Union

Public health spending > % of GDP 7.18%
Ranked 16th. 1% more than United States
7.14%
Ranked 17th.

SOURCES: Level & Trends in Child Mortality. Report 2010. Estimates Developed by the UN Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation (UNICEF, WHO, World Bank, UN DESA, UNPD).; (1) United Nations Population Division. 2009. World Population Prospects: The 2008 Revision. New York, United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs (advanced Excel tables). Available at http://esa.un.org/unpd/wpp2008/index.htm, (2) University of California, Berkeley, and Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research. Human Mortality Database. [ www.mortality.org or www.humanmortality.de] downloaded on Dec. 10, 2009.; World Health Organization National Health Account database (see http://apps.who.int/nha/database/DataExplorerRegime.aspx for the most recent updates).; World Health Organisation, OECD, supplemented by country data.; CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; (1) United Nations Population Division. 2009. World Population Prospects: The 2008 Revision. New York, United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs (advanced Excel tables), (2) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (3) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (4) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (5) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; Derived from male and female life expectancy at birth from sources such as: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; World Health Organization, Global Atlas of the Health Workforce. For latest updates and metadata, see http://apps.who.int/globalatlas/.; Food and Agriculture Organisation, Food Security Statistics (http://www.fao.org/economic/ess/food-security-statistics/en/).; World Health Organisation National Health Account database (www.who.int/nha/en) supplemented by country data.; United Nations Population Division. 2009. World Population Prospects: The 2008 Revision. New York, United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs (advanced Excel tables). Available at http://esa.un.org/unpd/wpp2008/index.htm.; WHO, OECD and supplemented by country data.; WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic.; Trends in Maternal Mortality: 1990-2008. Estimates Developed by WHO, UNICEF, UNFPA and the World Bank.; World Health Organisation, Global Tuberculosis Control Report.; UNICEF, State of the World's Children, Childinfo, and Demographic and Health Surveys by Macro International.; Derived based on the data from WHO's World Health Statistics.; Food and Agriculture Organisation (http://www.fao.org/faostat/foodsecurity/index_en.htm).; World Health Organisation and United Nations Children's Fund, Joint Measurement Programme (JMP) (http://www.wssinfo.org/).; World Health Organization, Worldwide Prevalence of Anemia.; WHO and UNICEF (http://www.who.int/immunisation_monitoring/routine/en/).; UNAIDS and the WHO's Report on the Global AIDS Epidemic.; International Diabetes Federation, Diabetes Atlas.; WHO and UNICEF (http://www.who.int/immunization_monitoring/routine/en/).

Citation

Adblocker detected! Please consider reading this notice.

We've detected that you are using AdBlock Plus or some other adblocking software which is preventing the page from fully loading.

We don't have any banner, Flash, animation, obnoxious sound, or popup ad. We do not implement these annoying types of ads!

We need money to operate the site, and almost all of it comes from our online advertising.

Please add www.nationmaster.com to your ad blocking whitelist or disable your adblocking software.

×