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Cuba

Cuba Maritime Stats

Definitions

  • Air transport, freight > Million ton-km per million: Air transport, freight (million ton-km). Air freight is the volume of freight, express, and diplomatic bags carried on each flight stage (operation of an aircraft from takeoff to its next landing), measured in metric tons times kilometers traveled. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Air transport, passengers carried: Air transport, passengers carried. Air passengers carried include both domestic and international aircraft passengers of air carriers registered in the country.
  • Air transport, passengers carried per 1000: Air transport, passengers carried. Air passengers carried include both domestic and international aircraft passengers of air carriers registered in the country. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Arms exports > Constant 1990 US$: Arms exports (constant 1990 US$). Arms transfers cover the supply of military weapons through sales, aid, gifts, and those made through manufacturing licenses. Data cover major conventional weapons such as aircraft, armored vehicles, artillery, radar systems, missiles, and ships designed for military use. Excluded are transfers of other military equipment such as small arms and light weapons, trucks, small artillery, ammunition, support equipment, technology transfers, and other services.
  • Container port traffic > TEU: 20 foot equivalent units: Container port traffic (TEU: 20 foot equivalent units). Port container traffic measures the flow of containers from land to sea transport modes., and vice versa, in twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs), a standard-size container. Data refer to coastal shipping as well as international journeys. Transshipment traffic is counted as two lifts at the intermediate port (once to off-load and again as an outbound lift) and includes empty units.
  • Container port traffic > TEU: 20 foot equivalent units per 1000: Container port traffic (TEU: 20 foot equivalent units). Port container traffic measures the flow of containers from land to sea transport modes., and vice versa, in twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs), a standard-size container. Data refer to coastal shipping as well as international journeys. Transshipment traffic is counted as two lifts at the intermediate port (once to off-load and again as an outbound lift) and includes empty units. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Export value index > 2000 = 100 per million: Export value index (2000 = 100). Export values are the current value of exports (f.o.b.) converted to U.S. dollars and expressed as a percentage of the average for the base period (2000). UNCTAD's export value indexes are reported for most economies. For selected economies for which UNCTAD does not publish data, the export value indexes are derived from export volume indexes (line 72) and corresponding unit value indexes of exports (line 74) in the IMF's International Financial Statistics. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Import value index > 2000 = 100: Import value index (2000 = 100). Import value indexes are the current value of imports (c.i.f.) converted to U.S. dollars and expressed as a percentage of the average for the base period (2000). UNCTAD's import value indexes are reported for most economies. For selected economies for which UNCTAD does not publish data, the import value indexes are derived from import volume indexes (line 73) and corresponding unit value indexes of imports (line 75) in the IMF's International Financial Statistics.
  • Import value index > 2000 = 100 per million: Import value index (2000 = 100). Import value indexes are the current value of imports (c.i.f.) converted to U.S. dollars and expressed as a percentage of the average for the base period (2000). UNCTAD's import value indexes are reported for most economies. For selected economies for which UNCTAD does not publish data, the import value indexes are derived from import volume indexes (line 73) and corresponding unit value indexes of imports (line 75) in the IMF's International Financial Statistics. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Imports of goods and services > Constant 2000 US$: Imports of goods and services (constant 2000 US$). Imports of goods and services represent the value of all goods and other market services received from the rest of the world. They include the value of merchandise, freight, insurance, transport, travel, royalties, license fees, and other services, such as communication, construction, financial, information, business, personal, and government services. They exclude compensation of employees and investment income (formerly called factor services) and transfer payments. Data are in constant 2005 U.S. dollars.
  • Liner shipping connectivity index > Maximum value in 2004 = 100: Liner shipping connectivity index (maximum value in 2004 = 100). The Liner Shipping Connectivity Index captures how well countries are connected to global shipping networks. It is computed by the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) based on five components of the maritime transport sector: number of ships, their container-carrying capacity, maximum vessel size, number of services, and number of companies that deploy container ships in a country's ports. For each component a country's value is divided by the maximum value of each component in 2004, the five components are averaged for each country, and the average is divided by the maximum average for 2004 and multiplied by 100. The index generates a value of 100 for the country with the highest average index in 2004. . The underlying data come from Containerisation International Online.
  • Liner shipping connectivity index > Maximum value in 2004 = 100 per million: Liner shipping connectivity index (maximum value in 2004 = 100). The Liner Shipping Connectivity Index captures how well countries are connected to global shipping networks. It is computed by the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) based on five components of the maritime transport sector: number of ships, their container-carrying capacity, maximum vessel size, number of services, and number of companies that deploy container ships in a country's ports. For each component a country's value is divided by the maximum value of each component in 2004, the five components are averaged for each country, and the average is divided by the maximum average for 2004 and multiplied by 100. The index generates a value of 100 for the country with the highest average index in 2004. . The underlying data come from Containerisation International Online. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Logistics performance index: Ability to track and trace consignments > 1=low to 5=high: Logistics performance index: Ability to track and trace consignments (1=low to 5=high). Data are from Logistics Performance Index surveys conducted by the World Bank in partnership with academic and international institutions and private companies and individuals engaged in international logistics. 2009 round of surveys covered more than 5,000 country assessments by nearly 1,000 international freight forwarders. Respondents evaluate eight markets on six core dimensions on a scale from 1 (worst) to 5 (best). The markets are chosen based on the most important export and import markets of the respondent's country, random selection, and, for landlocked countries, neighboring countries that connect them with international markets. Details of the survey methodology are in Arvis and others' Connecting to Compete 2010: Trade Logistics in the Global Economy (2010). Respondents evaluated the ability to track and trace consignments when shipping to the market, on a rating ranging from 1 (very low) to 5 (very high). Scores are averaged across all respondents.
  • Logistics performance index: Efficiency of customs clearance process > 1=low to 5=high: Logistics performance index: Efficiency of customs clearance process (1=low to 5=high). Data are from Logistics Performance Index surveys conducted by the World Bank in partnership with academic and international institutions and private companies and individuals engaged in international logistics. 2009 round of surveys covered more than 5,000 country assessments by nearly 1,000 international freight forwarders. Respondents evaluate eight markets on six core dimensions on a scale from 1 (worst) to 5 (best). The markets are chosen based on the most important export and import markets of the respondent's country, random selection, and, for landlocked countries, neighboring countries that connect them with international markets. Details of the survey methodology are in Arvis and others' Connecting to Compete 2010: Trade Logistics in the Global Economy (2010). Respondents evaluated efficiency of customs clearance processes (i.e. speed, simplicity and predictability of formalities), on a rating ranging from 1 (very low) to 5 (very high). Scores are averaged across all respondents.
  • Logistics performance index: Efficiency of customs clearance process > 1=low to 5=high per million: Logistics performance index: Efficiency of customs clearance process (1=low to 5=high). Data are from Logistics Performance Index surveys conducted by the World Bank in partnership with academic and international institutions and private companies and individuals engaged in international logistics. 2009 round of surveys covered more than 5,000 country assessments by nearly 1,000 international freight forwarders. Respondents evaluate eight markets on six core dimensions on a scale from 1 (worst) to 5 (best). The markets are chosen based on the most important export and import markets of the respondent's country, random selection, and, for landlocked countries, neighboring countries that connect them with international markets. Details of the survey methodology are in Arvis and others' Connecting to Compete 2010: Trade Logistics in the Global Economy (2010). Respondents evaluated efficiency of customs clearance processes (i.e. speed, simplicity and predictability of formalities), on a rating ranging from 1 (very low) to 5 (very high). Scores are averaged across all respondents. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Air transport, freight > Million ton-km per million 0.0 2012 139th out of 151
Air transport, passengers carried 654,256 2012 108th out of 151
Air transport, passengers carried per 1000 58.05 2012 112th out of 151
Arms exports > Constant 1990 US$ $8.00 million 1980 34th out of 44
Container port traffic > TEU: 20 foot equivalent units 246,773 2011 91st out of 121
Container port traffic > TEU: 20 foot equivalent units per 1000 21.88 2011 102nd out of 121
Export value index > 2000 = 100 per million 33.33 2011 111th out of 197
Import value index > 2000 = 100 295.26 2011 116th out of 197
Import value index > 2000 = 100 per million 26.18 2011 131st out of 197
Imports of goods and services > Constant 2000 US$ $10.40 billion 2011 79th out of 128
Liner shipping connectivity index > Maximum value in 2004 = 100 5.96 2012 113th out of 155
Liner shipping connectivity index > Maximum value in 2004 = 100 per million 0.528 2012 131st out of 155
Logistics performance index: Ability to track and trace consignments > 1=low to 5=high 2.26 2012 135th out of 154
Logistics performance index: Efficiency of customs clearance process > 1=low to 5=high 2.18 2012 127th out of 154
Logistics performance index: Efficiency of customs clearance process > 1=low to 5=high per million 0.193 2012 85th out of 154

SOURCES: International Civil Aviation Organization, Civil Aviation Statistics of the World and ICAO staff estimates. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; International Civil Aviation Organization, Civil Aviation Statistics of the World and ICAO staff estimates.; Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), Yearbook: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security.; Containerisation International, Containerisation International Yearbook.; Containerisation International, Containerisation International Yearbook. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, Handbook of Statistics and data files, and International Monetary Fund, International Financial Statistics. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, Handbook of Statistics and data files, and International Monetary Fund, International Financial Statistics.; World Bank national accounts data; United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, Review of Maritime Transport 2010.; United Nations Conference on Trade and Development, Review of Maritime Transport 2010. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; World Bank and Turku School of Economics, Logistic Performance Index Surveys. Data are available online at : http://www.worldbank.org/lpi. Summary results are published in Arvis and others' Connecting to Compete: Trade Logistics in the Global Economy, The Logistics Performance Index and Its Indicators report.; World Bank and Turku School of Economics, Logistic Performance Index Surveys. Data are available online at : http://www.worldbank.org/lpi. Summary results are published in Arvis and others' Connecting to Compete: Trade Logistics in the Global Economy, The Logistics Performance Index and Its Indicators report. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.

Citation

Cuba Transport > Maritime Profiles (Subcategories)

Imports of goods and services 5

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