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Italy

Italy Energy Stats

Definitions

  • Adjusted savings: energy depletion > Current US$: Adjusted savings: energy depletion (current US$). Energy depletion is the ratio of the value of the stock of energy resources to the remaining reserve lifetime (capped at 25 years). It covers coal, crude oil, and natural gas.
  • Adjusted savings: energy depletion > Current US$ per capita: Adjusted savings: energy depletion (current US$). Energy depletion is the ratio of the value of the stock of energy resources to the remaining reserve lifetime (capped at 25 years). It covers coal, crude oil, and natural gas. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Carbon dioxide emissions from consumption of energy: This entry is the total amount of carbon dioxide, measured in metric tons, released by burning fossil fuels in the process of producing and consuming energy.
  • Coal > Consumption: Billion short tons of coal consumed per country per year.
  • Coal > Consumption per capita: Billion short tons of coal consumed per country per year. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Commercial energy use: Commercial energy use (kg of oil equivalent per capita). Commercial energy use refers to apparent consumption, which is equal to indigenous production plus imports and stock changes, minus exports and fuels supplied to ships and aircraft engaged in international transport.
  • Crude oil > Imports per thousand people: This entry is the total amount of crude oil imported, in barrels per day (bbl/day). Figures expressed per thousand people for the same year.
  • Crude oil > Production: This entry is the total amount of crude oil produced, in barrels per day (bbl/day).
  • Crude oil > Production per thousand people: This entry is the total amount of crude oil produced, in barrels per day (bbl/day). Figures expressed per thousand people for the same year.
  • Crude oil > Proved reserves: This entry is the stock of proved reserves of crude oil, in barrels (bbl). Proved reserves are those quantities of petroleum which, by analysis of geological and engineering data, can be estimated with a high degree of confidence to be commercially recoverable from a given date forward, from known reservoirs and under current economic conditions.
  • Crude oil > Proved reserves per capita: This entry is the stock of proved reserves of crude oil, in barrels (bbl). Proved reserves are those quantities of petroleum which, by analysis of geological and engineering data, can be estimated with a high degree of confidence to be commercially recoverable from a given date forward, from known reservoirs and under current economic conditions. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Electric power > Consumption > KWh: Electric power consumption measures the production of power plants and combined heat and power plants less transmission, distribution, and transformation losses and own use by heat and power plants.
  • Electric power > Consumption > KWh per capita: Electric power consumption measures the production of power plants and combined heat and power plants less transmission, distribution, and transformation losses and own use by heat and power plants. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Electric power consumption > KWh: Electric power consumption (kWh). Electric power consumption measures the production of power plants and combined heat and power plants less transmission, distribution, and transformation losses and own use by heat and power plants.
  • Electric power consumption > KWh per capita: Electric power consumption (kWh per capita). Electric power consumption measures the production of power plants and combined heat and power plants less transmission, distribution, and transformation losses and own use by heat and power plants.
  • Electric power transmission and distribution losses > KWh: Electric power transmission and distribution losses (kWh). Electric power transmission and distribution losses include losses in transmission between sources of supply and points of distribution and in the distribution to consumers, including pilferage.
  • Electricity > Consumption: Total electricity consumed annually plus imports and minus exports, expressed in kilowatt-hours. The discrepancy between the amount of electricity generated and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is accounted for as loss in transmission and distribution.
  • Electricity > Consumption > Per capita: Total electricity consumed annually plus imports and minus exports, expressed in kilowatt-hours. The discrepancy between the amount of electricity generated and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is accounted for as loss in transmission and distribution. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Electricity > Consumption per capita: Total electricity consumed annually plus imports and minus exports, expressed in kilowatt-hours. The discrepancy between the amount of electricity generated and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is accounted for as loss in transmission and distribution. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Electricity > From other renewable sources: This entry measures the capacity of plants that generate electricity by using renewable energy sources other than hydroelectric (including, for example, wind, waves, solar, and geothermal), expressed as a share of the country's total generating capacity.
  • Electricity > Installed generating capacity: This entry is the total capacity of currently installed generators, expressed in kilowatts (kW), to produce electricity. A 10-kilowatt (kW) generator will produce 10 kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity, if it runs continuously for one hour.
  • Electricity > Installed generating capacity per thousand people: This entry is the total capacity of currently installed generators, expressed in kilowatts (kW), to produce electricity. A 10-kilowatt (kW) generator will produce 10 kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity, if it runs continuously for one hour. Figures expressed per thousand people for the same year.
  • Electricity > Production: The annual electricity generated expressed in kilowatt-hours. The discrepancy between the amount of electricity generated and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is accounted for as loss in transmission and distribution.
  • Electricity > Production > KWh: Electricity production is measured at the terminals of all alternator sets in a station. In addition to hydropower, coal, oil, gas, and nuclear power generation, it covers generation by geothermal, solar, wind, and tide and wave energy, as well as that from combustible renewables and waste. Production includes the output of electricity plants that are designed to produce electricity only as well as that of combined heat and power plants."
  • Electricity > Production > Per capita: The annual electricity generated expressed in kilowatt-hours. The discrepancy between the amount of electricity generated and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is accounted for as loss in transmission and distribution. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Electricity > Production per capita: The annual electricity generated expressed in kilowatt-hours. The discrepancy between the amount of electricity generated and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is accounted for as loss in transmission and distribution. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Electricity production > KWh: Electricity production (kWh). Electricity production is measured at the terminals of all alternator sets in a station. In addition to hydropower, coal, oil, gas, and nuclear power generation, it covers generation by geothermal, solar, wind, and tide and wave energy, as well as that from combustible renewables and waste. Production includes the output of electricity plants that are designed to produce electricity only as well as that of combined heat and power plants.
  • Electricity production > KWh per capita: Electricity production (kWh). Electricity production is measured at the terminals of all alternator sets in a station. In addition to hydropower, coal, oil, gas, and nuclear power generation, it covers generation by geothermal, solar, wind, and tide and wave energy, as well as that from combustible renewables and waste. Production includes the output of electricity plants that are designed to produce electricity only as well as that of combined heat and power plants. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Electricity production from coal sources > KWh: Electricity production from coal sources (kWh). Sources of electricity refer to the inputs used to generate electricity. Coal refers to all coal and brown coal, both primary (including hard coal and lignite-brown coal) and derived fuels (including patent fuel, coke oven coke, gas coke, coke oven gas, and blast furnace gas). Peat is also included in this category.
  • Electricity production from coal sources > KWh per capita: Electricity production from coal sources (kWh). Sources of electricity refer to the inputs used to generate electricity. Coal refers to all coal and brown coal, both primary (including hard coal and lignite-brown coal) and derived fuels (including patent fuel, coke oven coke, gas coke, coke oven gas, and blast furnace gas). Peat is also included in this category. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Electricity production from hydroelectric sources > KWh: Electricity production from hydroelectric sources (kWh). Sources of electricity refer to the inputs used to generate electricity. Hydropower refers to electricity produced by hydroelectric power plants.
  • Electricity production from hydroelectric sources > KWh per capita: Electricity production from hydroelectric sources (kWh). Sources of electricity refer to the inputs used to generate electricity. Hydropower refers to electricity produced by hydroelectric power plants. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Electricity production from natural gas sources > KWh: Electricity production from natural gas sources (kWh). Sources of electricity refer to the inputs used to generate electricity. Gas refers to natural gas but excludes natural gas liquids.
  • Electricity production from natural gas sources > KWh per capita: Electricity production from natural gas sources (kWh). Sources of electricity refer to the inputs used to generate electricity. Gas refers to natural gas but excludes natural gas liquids. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Electricity production from nuclear sources > KWh: Electricity production from nuclear sources (kWh). Sources of electricity refer to the inputs used to generate electricity. Nuclear power refers to electricity produced by nuclear power plants.
  • Electricity production from oil sources > KWh: Electricity production from oil sources (kWh). Sources of electricity refer to the inputs used to generate electricity. Oil refers to crude oil and petroleum products.
  • Electricity production from renewable sources > KWh: Electricity production from renewable sources (kWh). Electricity production from renewable sources includes hydropower, geothermal, solar, tides, wind, biomass, and biofuels.
  • Electricity production from renewable sources > KWh per capita: Electricity production from renewable sources (kWh). Electricity production from renewable sources includes hydropower, geothermal, solar, tides, wind, biomass, and biofuels. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Electricity production from renewable sources, excluding hydroelectric > KWh: Electricity production from renewable sources, excluding hydroelectric (kWh). Electricity production from renewable sources, excluding hydroelectric, includes geothermal, solar, tides, wind, biomass, and biofuels.
  • Electricity production from renewable sources, excluding hydroelectric > KWh per capita: Electricity production from renewable sources, excluding hydroelectric (kWh). Electricity production from renewable sources, excluding hydroelectric, includes geothermal, solar, tides, wind, biomass, and biofuels. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Production > Kilotons of oil equivalent: Energy production refers to forms of primary energy--petroleum (crude oil, natural gas liquids, and oil from nonconventional sources), natural gas, solid fuels (coal, lignite, and other derived fuels), and combustible renewables and waste--and primary electricity, all converted into oil equivalents."
  • Energy use > Equivalent in kilograms of oil per capita: Energy use refers to use of primary energy before transformation to other end-use fuels, which is equal to indigenous production plus imports and stock changes, minus exports and fuels supplied to ships and aircraft engaged in international transport."
  • Energy use > Kg of oil equivalent per $1,000 GDP > Constant 2005 PPP: Energy use (kg of oil equivalent) per $1,000 GDP (constant 2005 PPP). Energy use per PPP GDP is the kilogram of oil equivalent of energy use per constant PPP GDP. Energy use refers to use of primary energy before transformation to other end-use fuels, which is equal to indigenous production plus imports and stock changes, minus exports and fuels supplied to ships and aircraft engaged in international transport. PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to 2005 constant international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as a U.S. dollar has in the United States.
  • Energy use > Kg of oil equivalent per capita: Energy use (kg of oil equivalent per capita). Energy use refers to use of primary energy before transformation to other end-use fuels, which is equal to indigenous production plus imports and stock changes, minus exports and fuels supplied to ships and aircraft engaged in international transport.
  • Gasoline > Pump price for gasoline > US$ per liter: Pump price for gasoline (US$ per liter). Fuel prices refer to the pump prices of the most widely sold grade of gasoline. Prices have been converted from the local currency to U.S. dollars.
  • Gasoline > Road sector gasoline fuel consumption > Kt of oil equivalent: Road sector gasoline fuel consumption (kt of oil equivalent). Gasoline is light hydrocarbon oil use in internal combustion engine such as motor vehicles, excluding aircraft.
  • Gasoline > Road sector gasoline fuel consumption per capita > Kg of oil equivalent: Road sector gasoline fuel consumption per capita (kg of oil equivalent). Gasoline is light hydrocarbon oil use in internal combustion engine such as motor vehicles, excluding aircraft.
  • Gasoline prices: Ratio of premium gasoline price to world average
    Units: Ratio of Gasoline Price to World Average
    Units: Pump price for super gasoline (US$ per liter): Fuel prices refer to the pump prices of the most widely sold grade of gasoline. Prices have been converted from the local currency to U.S. dollars, and the ratio of the gas price to the world average in the same time period was used in order to normalize the data. For more information, see World Development Indicators, Table 3.12.

  • Geothermal power use: Annual utilization of geothermal power from direct-use sources in GWh/yr as of 2000.
  • Hydroelectric power > Production > KWh: Sources of electricity refer to the inputs used to generate electricity. Hydropower refers to electricity produced by hydroelectric power plants.
  • Hydroelectricity > Consumption: Figures for year 2003 in billion kilowatthours
  • Natural gas > Consumption: This entry is the total natural gas consumed in cubic meters (cu m). The discrepancy between the amount of natural gas produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes and other complicating factors.
  • Natural gas > Consumption per capita: This entry is the total natural gas consumed in cubic meters (cu m). The discrepancy between the amount of natural gas produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes and other complicating factors. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Natural gas > Proved reserves: This entry is the stock of proved reserves of natural gas in cubic meters (cu m). Proved reserves are those quantities of natural gas, which, by analysis of geological and engineering data, can be estimated with a high degree of confidence to be commercially recoverable from a given date forward, from known reservoirs and under current economic conditions.
  • Natural gas > Reserves per capita: . Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Oil > Consumption: This entry is the total oil consumed in barrels per day (bbl/day). The discrepancy between the amount of oil produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes, refinery gains, and other complicating factors.
  • Oil > Consumption > Million tonnes > Per capita: Oil: Consumption, Million tonnes, as of end of 2004

    Notes: Others have less than 0.05 Per capita figures expressed per 1 million population.

  • Oil > Consumption > Per capita: This entry is the total oil consumed in barrels per day (bbl/day). The discrepancy between the amount of oil produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes, refinery gains, and other complicating factors. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Oil > Consumption per 1000: This entry is the total oil consumed in barrels per day (bbl/day). The discrepancy between the amount of oil produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes, refinery gains, and other complicating factors. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Oil > Exports: This entry is the total oil exported in barrels per day (bbl/day), including both crude oil and oil products.
  • Oil > Imports: This entry is the total oil imported in barrels per day (bbl/day), including both crude oil and oil products.
  • Oil > Production: This entry is the total oil produced in barrels per day (bbl/day). The discrepancy between the amount of oil produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes, refinery gains, and other complicating factors.
  • Oil > Production > Million tonnes > Per capita: Oil: Production, Million tonnes, as of end of 2004

    Notes: Others have less than 0.05 Per capita figures expressed per 1 million population.

  • Oil > Production > Per capita: This entry is the total oil produced in barrels per day (bbl/day). The discrepancy between the amount of oil produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes, refinery gains, and other complicating factors. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Oil > Production per 1000: This entry is the total oil produced in barrels per day (bbl/day). The discrepancy between the amount of oil produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes, refinery gains, and other complicating factors. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Oil > Proved > Reserves per capita: This entry is the stock of proved reserves of crude oil in barrels (bbl). Proved reserves are those quantities of petroleum which, by analysis of geological and engineering data, can be estimated with a high degree of confidence to be commercially recoverable from a given date forward, from known reservoirs and under current economic conditions. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Oil > Reserves: According to Web definitions the term refers to the total amount of petroleum (oil) discovered in any given oil field or nation. Thus it can be said that Kuwait has xxxx millions of barrels (mb) of oil in the ground. However, the exact amount can never be known, simply because of the difficulty in sensing or "seeing" beneath the surface of the Earth. The term Proven Reserve or PR refers to an amount of oil that is generally accepted by geologists to be the actual amount of petroleum in the ground.
  • Oil > Reserves per capita: According to Web definitions the term refers to the total amount of petroleum (oil) discovered in any given oil field or nation. Thus it can be said that Kuwait has xxxx millions of barrels (mb) of oil in the ground. However, the exact amount can never be known, simply because of the difficulty in sensing or "seeing" beneath the surface of the Earth. The term Proven Reserve or PR refers to an amount of oil that is generally accepted by geologists to be the actual amount of petroleum in the ground. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Primary Consumption > Million tonnes oil equivalent: Primary Energy: Consumption, Million tonnes oil equivalent, as of end of 2004

    Notes: Others have less than 0.05

  • Refined petroleum products > Consumption: This entry is the country's total consumption of refined petroleum products, in barrels per day (bbl/day). The discrepancy between the amount of refined petroleum products produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes, refinery gains, and other complicating factors.
  • Refined petroleum products > Consumption per thousand people: This entry is the country's total consumption of refined petroleum products, in barrels per day (bbl/day). The discrepancy between the amount of refined petroleum products produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes, refinery gains, and other complicating factors. Figures expressed per thousand people for the same year.
  • Usage per person: Total primary energy supply TOE (tonnes of oil equivalent) per person (Year 2000).
  • Wind power > Installed windpower capacity > Megawatts: Installed wind power capacity around the world.
  • Wind power > Wind power generated > Terawatt hours: Total electricity generated from wind.
STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Adjusted savings: energy depletion > Current US$ $2.83 billion 2011 53th out of 211
Adjusted savings: energy depletion > Current US$ per capita $46.54 2011 72nd out of 211
Carbon dioxide emissions from consumption of energy 400.9 million Mt 2011 16th out of 210
Coal > Consumption 22.4 million 2001 7th out of 15
Coal > Consumption per capita 0.393 2001 5th out of 14
Commercial energy use 2,973.95 2000 38th out of 116
Crude oil > Imports per thousand people 26.3 bbl/day 2010 16th out of 184
Crude oil > Production 154,500 bbl/day 2012 43th out of 203
Crude oil > Production per thousand people 2.54 bbl/day 2012 72nd out of 202
Crude oil > Proved reserves 521.3 million bbl 2013 47th out of 193
Crude oil > Proved reserves per capita 8.48 bbl 2013 62nd out of 192
Electric power > Consumption > KWh 328.11 billion kWh 2004 12th out of 131
Electric power > Consumption > KWh per capita 5,640.09 kWh 2004 34th out of 128
Electric power consumption > KWh 327.46 billion 2011 13th out of 135
Electric power consumption > KWh per capita 5,392.72 2011 39th out of 135
Electric power transmission and distribution losses > KWh 20.85 billion 2011 20th out of 134
Electricity > Consumption 313.8 billion kWh 2011 4th out of 38
Electricity > Consumption > Per capita 5,417.24 kWh per capita 2007 34th out of 155
Electricity > Consumption per capita 5,305.24 kWh 2007 30th out of 146
Electricity > Exports 2.27 billion kWh 2012 26th out of 156
Electricity > From other renewable sources 15.8% of total installed capacity 2011 2nd out of 12
Electricity > Installed generating capacity 122.3 million kW 2011 2nd out of 11
Electricity > Installed generating capacity per thousand people 2,014.04 kW 2011 3rd out of 11
Electricity > Production 283.5 billion kWh 2011 11th out of 95
Electricity > Production > KWh 308.22 billion 2007 12th out of 129
Electricity > Production > Per capita 5,023.41 kWh per capita 2007 49th out of 176
Electricity > Production per capita 4,919.56 kWh 2007 47th out of 167
Electricity production > KWh 294.37 billion 2012 9th out of 34
Electricity production > KWh per capita 4,832.17 2012 28th out of 34
Electricity production from coal sources > KWh 47.12 billion 2012 11th out of 34
Electricity production from coal sources > KWh per capita 773.47 2012 23th out of 34
Electricity production from hydroelectric sources > KWh 41.89 billion 2012 8th out of 34
Electricity production from hydroelectric sources > KWh per capita 687.6 2012 15th out of 34
Electricity production from natural gas sources > KWh 135.84 billion 2012 4th out of 34
Electricity production from natural gas sources > KWh per capita 2,229.82 2012 7th out of 34
Electricity production from nuclear sources > KWh 0.0 2012 27th out of 34
Electricity production from oil sources > KWh 18.69 billion 2012 5th out of 34
Electricity production from renewable sources > KWh 89.73 billion 2012 7th out of 34
Electricity production from renewable sources > KWh per capita 1,472.96 2012 15th out of 34
Electricity production from renewable sources, excluding hydroelectric > KWh 47.84 billion 2012 4th out of 34
Electricity production from renewable sources, excluding hydroelectric > KWh per capita 785.37 2012 13th out of 34
Production > Kilotons of oil equivalent 26,381 2007 50th out of 129
Energy use > Equivalent in kilograms of oil per capita 3,000.63 2007 41st out of 129
Energy use > Kg of oil equivalent per $1,000 GDP > Constant 2005 PPP $98.96 2012 31st out of 35
Energy use > Kg of oil equivalent per capita 2,603.76 2012 28th out of 35
Gasoline > Pump price for gasoline > US$ per liter $2.28 2012 6th out of 166
Gasoline > Road sector gasoline fuel consumption > Kt of oil equivalent 9,678 2010 16th out of 136
Gasoline > Road sector gasoline fuel consumption per capita > Kg of oil equivalent 160.01 2010 49th out of 137
Gasoline prices 1.59 2002 14th out of 141
Geothermal power use 1,048 2000 12th out of 53
Hydroelectric power > Production > KWh 32.82 billion 2007 18th out of 129
Hydroelectricity > Consumption 36.32 2003 14th out of 212
Natural gas > Consumption 77.83 billion cu m 2011 9th out of 49
Natural gas > Consumption per capita 1,297.83 cu m 2009 13th out of 53
Natural gas > Production 2012 20th out of 51
Natural gas > Proved reserves 62.35 billion cu m 2013 58th out of 199
Natural gas > Reserves per capita 3,578.07 cubic feet 2005 42nd out of 71
Oil > Consumption 1.54 million bbl/day 2009 14th out of 193
Oil > Consumption > Million tonnes > Per capita 1.53 per 1 million people 2005 25th out of 63
Oil > Consumption > Per capita 29.27 bbl/day per 1,000 peopl 2007 27th out of 51
Oil > Consumption per 1000 25.53 bbl/day 2009 58th out of 182
Oil > Exports 586,900 bbl/day 2008 9th out of 33
Oil > Imports 1.91 million bbl/day 2008 8th out of 33
Oil > Production 146,500 bbl/day 2009 43th out of 180
Oil > Production > Million tonnes > Per capita 0.093 per 1 million people 2005 47th out of 48
Oil > Production > Per capita 2.87 bbl/day per 1,000 peopl 2007 66th out of 111
Oil > Production per 1000 2.43 bbl/day 2009 61st out of 168
Oil > Proved > Reserves per capita 7.01 bbl 2010 63th out of 186
Oil > Reserves 586.6 million barrels 2005 45th out of 97
Oil > Reserves per capita 10.01 barrels 2005 58th out of 94
Oil imports > Net 1.69 million barrels per day 2005 5th out of 21
Primary Consumption > Million tonnes oil equivalent 183.6 2004 12th out of 63
Refined petroleum products > Consumption 1.45 million bbl/day 2011 15th out of 208
Refined petroleum products > Consumption per thousand people 23.94 bbl/day 2011 71st out of 205
Usage per person 2.97 TOE per person 2000 18th out of 18
Wind power > Installed windpower capacity > Megawatts 5,797 Megawatts 2010 7th out of 40
Wind power > Wind power generated > Terawatt hours 6.11 terawatt hours 2008 6th out of 22

SOURCES: The Changing Wealth of Nations: Measuring Sustainable Development in the New Millennium; The Changing Wealth of Nations: Measuring Sustainable Development in the New Millennium. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; CIA World Factbooks 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013; Energy Information Administration, US Department of Energy; Energy Information Administration, US Department of Energy. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; CIA World Factbooks 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; World Development Indicators database; World Development Indicators database. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; International Energy Agency; CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; International Energy Agency (IEA Statistics \xA9 OECD/IEA, http://www.iea.org/stats/index.asp), Energy Statistics and Balances of Non-OECD Countries, Energy Statistics of OECD Countries, and Energy Balances of OECD Countries.; International Energy Agency. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; IEA; IEA. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; International Energy Agency (IEA Statistics \xA9 OECD/IEA, http://www.iea.org/stats/index.asp).; German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ).; German Agency for Technical Cooperation (GTZ), Fuel Prices and Taxation (1999) and the electronic update for2000. Available from World Bank, World Development Indicators 2002, WDI table 3.12. via ciesin.org; Lund and Freeston; Proceedings of the World Geothermal Congress 2000; Energy Information Administration; CIA World Factbook, 28 July 2005. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; BP Statistical Review of World Energy 2005; CIA World Factbook, 28 July 2005; lEA, Energy Balances of OECD Countries 1999-2000 (lEA, Paris, 2001); World Wind Energy Association, World Wind Energy Report 2008.; U.S Energy Information Administration: International Energy Statistics[18]

Citation

"Italy Energy Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/Italy/Energy/All-stats

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Magnetic Field Sustainable Energy
Sustainable energy can be well understood if we attempt to understand it is a type of energy source that has been with us from the beginning of time. Magneto-motive energy has been with us from the dawn of time. Imagination the bewilderment of Magnes. ( He was an elderly shepherd) when he discovered that the iron tip of his staff became stuck to a large black rock. Living in the area of Northern Greece called Magnesia, this invisible power motivated people to believe in magical properties and mystical powers of the black rock. As civilization moved forward into the future, Hans Christian Oersted (1777-1851 Danish) demonstrated how magnetism was related to electricity.
Past Sources of Reliable Sustainable Energy

The past list of sources of sustainable energy are solar energy, wind energy, geothermal and nuclear energy. The energy source like solar are abundant although the sun does not shine 24 hours a day, requiring the use of storage batteries It is the only natural resources which has no constraints in terms of availability, cost and ease of use. (You must keep the solar panels clean)
Wind energy and tidal power are also the types of sustainable energy because the wind and tidal pressure does not seem to seize or end. However, the wind pressure is limited to the mountain regions so as the tidal power is limited to coastal regions. Wind power is an environment friendly way of generating electricity. Sustainable energy sources are also known as green energy and alternative source of energy because of its environment attitude.
Nuclear energy is also considered a sustainable energy sources because 90% of uranium can be used again to perform nuclear fission again and again.  Therefore all those energy sources which can be used again and again without the fear of being diminished are parts of sustainable energy. Other important criteria of sustainable energy are its fuel efficacy.  Nuclear energy is a really efficient source of sustainable energy. However you need to understand the dangers of accidents, the damage to the environment that lasts for decades, rod storage & transport.
Geothermal requires major install process and there is no guaranty that an earthquake could damage the system and cost you thousands more in repairs. Magnetic-electromagnetic fields are self sustaining in the generator design.
The Need for Efficient Sustainable Energy

Until the beginning of nineteenth century the major energy sources were wood and timber. However later it was replaced with other natural resources like oil, gas and coal. The use of wood as an energy sources is a scarce resource it can not meet the energy requirement for a large population. Moreover the concern for environment due the devastation of forests has increased the risk of global warming hence we need to grow more and more trees now. Fossil fuels like gas and oil are also getting scarce and the production of these resources is limited to the specific countries. The owners of the fossil fuels like coal, oil and natural gas also control their prices. Thus the need of the time was to search and look for the abundant natural resources which never seem to end. Hence the need for an efficient sustainable energy supply that can be used anywhere.

Energy Conservation

Energy conservation would become a thing of the past. The 21st Century promises to deliver electric cars, trucks, trains and even aircraft. Its wonderful what can be accomplished with portable power, however battery power is toxic too. Non-recycled batteries containing lead and sulfuric acid are contaminating landfills. Portable power products require batteries! Do they really? As the size and scope of the magnetic reactor reaches a ubiquitous point, batteries may well become an emergency-only resource. Using magnetic fields we can product all the power we could ever use. This would also enable us to heat and cool all of our streets, roads, highways, turnpikes, freeways, driveways, walkways, bridges and autobahn basically any man made surface could be heated and or cooled as needed for weather conditions. This would eliminate the need to resurface or to replace as often, saving local and national governments billions of dollars.

This process would also eliminate areas where ice and black ice forms, keeping everything we walk or drive on heated to 90 degrees fahrenheit during the winter free all the surfaces from snow buildup. Thus winter weather accidents could be cut down by 87% making it safer for all of us. During the summer all surfaces could be cooled to 80 degrees fahrenheit thus prolonging the surface life span. Concrete could be used at more locations around the world instead of oil based asphalt that also adds to the world warming.


Fossil Fuel Elimination

The elimination of using fossil fuels in our vehicles will give us unlimited use without the pollutants being dumped into our atmosphere. The elimination of gas, oil, natural gas, methane gas,and the transporting and underground piping, the gas leaks, explosions and fires that has cost thousands of lives over the past years would also be eliminated. Look back over the years and see how many ruptures in major gas lines, leaks inside homes and business along with truck/ship transport accidents that has already cost millions of dollars in damage and thousand of deaths. Old dependance on oil and the internal combustion engine have tainted our social perspective; as oil runs out conflicts will erupt around the world.

The Elimination of the Power Grid

Explore different locations around the world and see how many times they have lost power and how long they were without it, either by weather or man made power loss. Our countries, cities, towns, community, neighborhoods and homes & businesses would never need to worry about power loss for the above reasons.





How would we survive a long term power failure in respect to our needs, reports of the possibility this year that a solar storms coming in 2012 will cripple electric power, GPS equipment and communications systems for months, creating an electronic apocalypse not dreamt of since the days before Y2k hysteria gripped the world. The loss of power would make finding food dang near impossible we are too dependent on fast food stores and food brought via available stores.
How will we handle our children when they are hungry, board, sick or an accident that requires medical attention. Hospitals and emergency rooms have backup generators for power but even they are designed to fail thus the time span on them. What will happen then, all stores closed, all emergency rooms closed, all hospitals closed, all schools closed, majority of government offices will also be closed!
Will law enforcement or the military be able to protect us or will they be at home protecting their own families?

We invite you to our web site http://newhorizonsglobalconcepts.com we request your help and support to insure the future of our World, our Country, our States, Counties, Cities and children.

Posted on 09 Jul 2011

John Giordano

John Giordano