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Country vs country: Brazil and Morocco compared: Economy stats

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Definitions

  • Overview: This entry briefly describes the type of economy, including the degree of market orientation, the level of economic development, the most important natural resources, and the unique areas of specialization. It also characterizes major economic events and policy changes in the most recent 12 months and may include a statement about one or two key future macroeconomic trends.
  • Exports: This entry provides the total US dollar amount of merchandise exports on an f.o.b. (free on board) basis. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms.
  • Fiscal year: The beginning and ending months for a country's accounting period of 12 months, which often is the calendar year but which may begin in any month. All yearly references are for the calendar year (CY) unless indicated as a noncalendar fiscal year (FY).
  • GDP: GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Dollar figures for GDP are converted from domestic currencies using single year official exchange rates. For a few countries where the official exchange rate does not reflect the rate effectively applied to actual foreign exchange transactions, an alternative conversion factor is used.
  • GDP > Composition by sector > Industry: The gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods produced by the industrial sector within a nation in a given year. GDP dollar estimates in the Factbook are derived from purchasing power parity (PPP) calculations. See the CIA World Factbook for more information.
  • GDP > Per capita: This entry gives the gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. A nation's GDP at purchasing power parity (PPP) exchange rates is the sum value of all goods and services produced in the country valued at prices prevailing in the United States. This is the measure most economists prefer when looking at per-capita welfare and when comparing living conditions or use of resources across countries. The measure is difficult to compute, as a US dollar value has to be assigned to all goods and services in the country regardless of whether these goods and services have a direct equivalent in the United States (for example, the value of an ox-cart or non-US military equipment); as a result, PPP estimates for some countries are based on a small and sometimes different set of goods and services. In addition, many countries do not formally participate in the World Bank's PPP project that calculates these measures, so the resulting GDP estimates for these countries may lack precision. For many developing countries, PPP-based GDP measures are multiples of the official exchange rate (OER) measure. The difference between the OER- and PPP-denominated GDP values for most of the weathly industrialized countries are generally much smaller. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • GDP > Per capita > PPP: This entry shows GDP on a purchasing power parity basis divided by population as of 1 July for the same year.
  • GDP > Purchasing power parity: This entry gives the gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. A nation's GDP at purchasing power parity (PPP) exchange rates is the sum value of all goods and services produced in the country valued at prices prevailing in the United States. This is the measure most economists prefer when looking at per-capita welfare and when comparing living conditions or use of resources across countries. The measure is difficult to compute, as a US dollar value has to be assigned to all goods and services in the country regardless of whether these goods and services have a direct equivalent in the United States (for example, the value of an ox-cart or non-US military equipment); as a result, PPP estimates for some countries are based on a small and sometimes different set of goods and services. In addition, many countries do not formally participate in the World Bank's PPP project that calculates these measures, so the resulting GDP estimates for these countries may lack precision. For many developing countries, PPP-based GDP measures are multiples of the official exchange rate (OER) measure. The difference between the OER- and PPP-denominated GDP values for most of the weathly industrialized countries are generally much smaller.
  • GDP > Real growth rate: GDP growth on an annual basis adjusted for inflation and expressed as a percent.
  • GDP per capita: GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Dollar figures for GDP are converted from domestic currencies using single year official exchange rates. For a few countries where the official exchange rate does not reflect the rate effectively applied to actual foreign exchange transactions, an alternative conversion factor is used. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Gross National Income: GNI, Atlas method (current US$). GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and prop).
  • Population below poverty line: National estimates of the percentage of the population lying below the poverty line are based on surveys of sub-groups, with the results weighted by the number of people in each group. Definitions of poverty vary considerably among nations. For example, rich nations generally employ more generous standards of poverty than poor nations.
  • Public debt: This entry records the cumulatiive total of all government borrowings less repayments that are denominated in a country's home currency. Public debt should not be confused with external debt, which reflects the foreign currency liabilities of both the private and public sector and must be financed out of foreign exchange earnings.
  • Tourist arrivals: International inbound tourists (overnight visitors) are the number of tourists who travel to a country other than that in which they have their usual residence, but outside their usual environment, for a period not exceeding 12 months and whose main purpose in visiting is other than an activity remunerated from within the country visited. When data on number of tourists are not available, the number of visitors, which includes tourists, same-day visitors, cruise passengers, and crew members, is shown instead. Sources and collection methods for arrivals differ across countries. In some cases data are from border statistics (police, immigration, and the like) and supplemented by border surveys. In other cases data are from tourism accommodation establishments. For some countries number of arrivals is limited to arrivals by air and for others to arrivals staying in hotels. Some countries include arrivals of nationals residing abroad while others do not. Caution should thus be used in comparing arrivals across countries. The data on inbound tourists refer to the number of arrivals, not to the number of people traveling. Thus a person who makes several trips to a country during a given period is counted each time as a new arrival."
  • Unemployment rate: This entry contains the percent of the labor force that is without jobs. Substantial underemployment might be noted.
  • Debt > External: Total public and private debt owed to non-residents repayable in foreign currency, goods, or services.
  • Inflation rate > Consumer prices: This entry furnishes the annual percent change in consumer prices compared with the previous year's consumer prices.
  • Human Development Index: The human development index values in this table were calculated using a consistent methodology and consistent data series. They are not strictly comparable with those in earlier Human Development Reports.
  • Budget > Revenues: Revenues calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms
  • GDP > Composition by sector > Agriculture: The gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods produced by the agricultural sector within a nation in a given year. GDP dollar estimates in the Factbook are derived from purchasing power parity (PPP) calculations. See the CIA World Factbook for more information.
  • Industries: A rank ordering of industries starting with the largest by value of annual output.
  • GDP > Composition by sector > Services: The gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final services produced within a nation in a given year. GDP dollar estimates in the Factbook are derived from purchasing power parity (PPP) calculations. See the CIA World Factbook for more information.
  • Budget surplus > + or deficit > -: This entry records the difference between national government revenues and expenditures, expressed as a percent of GDP. A positive (+) number indicates that revenues exceeded expenditures (a budget surplus), while a negative (-) number indicates the reverse (a budget deficit). Normalizing the data, by dividing the budget balance by GDP, enables easy comparisons across countries and indicates whether a national government saves or borrows money. Countries with high budget deficits (relative to their GDPs) generally have more difficulty raising funds to finance expenditures, than those with lower deficits.
  • Exports > Commodities: This entry provides a listing of the highest-valued exported products; it sometimes includes the percent of total dollar value.
  • Distribution of family income > Gini index: This index measures the degree of inequality in the distribution of family income in a country. The index is calculated from the Lorenz curve, in which cumulative family income is plotted against the number of families arranged from the poorest to the ric
  • Economic freedom: Index of 'economic freedom', according to the American organisation 'The Heritage Foundation'. It is worth noting that such indices are based on highly culturally contingent factors. This data makes a number of assumptions about 'freedom' and the role of the government that are not accepted by much of the world's population. A broad discussion of The Heritage Foundation's definition and methodology can be found at http://www.heritage.org/research/features/index/ChapterPDFs/chapter5.HTML.
  • Debt > External > Per capita: Total public and private debt owed to non-residents repayable in foreign currency, goods, or services. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • GDP > Composition, by sector of origin > Services: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by sector of origin, which shows where production takes place in an economy. The distribution gives the percentage contribution of agriculture, industry, and services to total GDP, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete. Agriculture includes farming, fishing, and forestry. Industry includes mining, manufacturing, energy production, and construction. Services cover government activities, communications, transportation, finance, and all other private economic activities that do not produce material goods.
  • World trade > Exports: Exports of goods and services represent the value of all goods and other market services provided to the rest of the world. They include the value of merchandise, freight, insurance, transport, travel, royalties, license fees, and other services, such as communication, construction, financial, information, business, personal, and government services. They exclude compensation of employees and investment income (formerly called factor services) and transfer payments. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • Imports > Commodities: This entry provides a listing of the highest-valued imported products; it sometimes includes the percent of total dollar value.
  • Gross National Income per capita: GNI, Atlas method (current US$). GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and prop). Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Inequality > GINI index: Gini index measures the extent to which the distribution of income (or, in some cases, consumption expenditure) among individuals or households within an economy deviates from a perfectly equal distribution. A Lorenz curve plots the cumulative percentages of total income received against the cumulative number of recipients, starting with the poorest individual or household. The Gini index measures the area between the Lorenz curve and a hypothetical line of absolute equality, expressed as a percentage of the maximum area under the line. Thus a Gini index of 0 represents perfect equality, while an index of 100 implies perfect inequality."
  • Exchange rates: The official value of a country's monetary unit at a given date or over a given period of time, as expressed in units of local currency per US dollar and as determined by international market forces or official fiat.
  • Budget > Expenditures: Expenditures calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms
  • GINI index: Gini index measures the extent to which the distribution of income (or, in some cases, consumption expenditure) among individuals or households within an economy deviates from a perfectly equal distribution. A Lorenz curve plots the cumulative percentages of total income received against the cumulative number of recipients, starting with the poorest individual or household. The Gini index measures the area between the Lorenz curve and a hypothetical line of absolute equality, expressed as a percentage of the maximum area under the line. Thus a Gini index of 0 represents perfect equality, while an index of 100 implies perfect inequality.
  • Imports: This entry provides the total US dollar amount of merchandise imports on a c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight) or f.o.b. (free on board) basis. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms.
  • Tourist arrivals > Per capita: International inbound tourists (overnight visitors) are the number of tourists who travel to a country other than that in which they have their usual residence, but outside their usual environment, for a period not exceeding 12 months and whose main purpose in visiting is other than an activity remunerated from within the country visited. When data on number of tourists are not available, the number of visitors, which includes tourists, same-day visitors, cruise passengers, and crew members, is shown instead. Sources and collection methods for arrivals differ across countries. In some cases data are from border statistics (police, immigration, and the like) and supplemented by border surveys. In other cases data are from tourism accommodation establishments. For some countries number of arrivals is limited to arrivals by air and for others to arrivals staying in hotels. Some countries include arrivals of nationals residing abroad while others do not. Caution should thus be used in comparing arrivals across countries. The data on inbound tourists refer to the number of arrivals, not to the number of people traveling. Thus a person who makes several trips to a country during a given period is counted each time as a new arrival." Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Big Mac Index: Price of a McDonald's Big Mac in US Dollars at current exchange rates. January 12th, 2006.
  • GDP > Purchasing power parity per capita: This entry gives the gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. A nation's GDP at purchasing power parity (PPP) exchange rates is the sum value of all goods and services produced in the country valued at prices prevailing in the United States. This is the measure most economists prefer when looking at per-capita welfare and when comparing living conditions or use of resources across countries. The measure is difficult to compute, as a US dollar value has to be assigned to all goods and services in the country regardless of whether these goods and services have a direct equivalent in the United States (for example, the value of an ox-cart or non-US military equipment); as a result, PPP estimates for some countries are based on a small and sometimes different set of goods and services. In addition, many countries do not formally participate in the World Bank's PPP project that calculates these measures, so the resulting GDP estimates for these countries may lack precision. For many developing countries, PPP-based GDP measures are multiples of the official exchange rate (OER) measure. The difference between the OER- and PPP-denominated GDP values for most of the weathly industrialized countries are generally much smaller. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Debt > Government debt > Public debt, share of GDP: Public debt as % of GDP (CIA).

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Labor force: This entry contains the total labor force figure.
  • Currency > PPP conversion factor to official exchange rate ratio: Purchasing power parity conversion factor is the number of units of a country's currency required to buy the same amount of goods and services in the domestic market as a U.S. dollar would buy in the United States. Official exchange rate refers to the exchange rate determined by national authorities or to the rate determined in the legally sanctioned exchange market. It is calculated as an annual average based on monthly averages (local currency units relative to the U.S. dollar). The ratio of the PPP conversion factor to the official exchange rate (also referred to as the national price level) makes it possible to compare the cost of the bundle of goods that make up gross domestic product (GDP) across countries. It tells how many dollars are needed to buy a dollar's worth of goods in the country as compared to the United States.
  • GDP > Per capita > PPP per thousand people: This entry shows GDP on a purchasing power parity basis divided by population as of 1 July for the same year. Figures expressed per thousand people for the same year.
  • Exports > Main exports: Country main exports.
  • Currency > Official exchange rate > LCU per US$, period average: Official exchange rate (LCU per US$, period average). Official exchange rate refers to the exchange rate determined by national authorities or to the rate determined in the legally sanctioned exchange market. It is calculated as an annual average based on monthly averages (local currency units relative to the U.S. dollar).
  • Trade > Exports per capita: The total US dollar amount of exports on an f.o.b. (free on board) basis. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Population below poverty line > Per capita: National estimates of the percentage of the population lying below the poverty line are based on surveys of sub-groups, with the results weighted by the number of people in each group. Definitions of poverty vary considerably among nations. For example, rich nations generally employ more generous standards of poverty than poor nations. Per capita figures expressed per 1 million population.
  • Micro > Small and medium enterprises > Number: Micro, small, and medium-size enterprises are business that may be defined by the number of employees. There is no international standard definition of firm size; however, many institutions that collect information use the following size categories: micro enterprises have 0-9 employees, small enterprises have 10-49 employees, and medium-size enterprises have 50-249 employees.
  • Exports per capita: This entry provides the total US dollar amount of merchandise exports on an f.o.b. (free on board) basis. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Exports > Partners: This entry provides a rank ordering of trading partners starting with the most important; it sometimes includes the percent of total dollar value.
  • Consumer price index: Consumer price index reflects changes in the cost to the average consumer of acquiring a fixed basket of goods and services that may be fixed or changed at specified intervals, such as yearly. The Laspeyres formula is generally used.
    2000 = 100
  • Current account balance: This entry records a country's net trade in goods and services, plus net earnings from rents, interest, profits, and dividends, and net transfer payments (such as pension funds and worker remittances) to and from the rest of the world during the period specified. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms.
  • GNI per capita: Country GNI per capita.
  • Technology index: The technology index denotes the country's technological readiness. This index is created with such indicators as companies spending on R&D;, the creativity of its scientific community, personal computer and internet penetration rates.
  • Tax > Average time to clear customs > Days: Average time to clear customs is the number of days to clear an imported good through customs.
  • Consumer spending: Household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption) is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country. This item also includes any statistical discrepancy in the use of resources relative to the supply of resources."
  • GDP per capita > PPP > Current international $: GDP per capita based on purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current international dollars.
  • International tourism > Receipts > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: International tourism receipts are expenditures by international inbound visitors, including payments to national carriers for international transport. These receipts should include any other prepayment made for goods or services received in the destination country. They also may include receipts from same-day visitors, except in cases where these are so important as to justify a separate classification. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • GDP per capita > Constant 2000 US$: GDP per capita is gross domestic product divided by midyear population. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant U.S. dollars.
  • GDP > Official exchange rate: This entry gives the gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. A nation's GDP at offical exchange rates (OER) is the home-currency-denominated annual GDP figure divided by the bilateral average US exchange rate with that country in that year. The measure is simple to compute and gives a precise measure of the value of output. Many economists prefer this measure when gauging the economic power an economy maintains vis-a-vis its neighbors, judging that an exchange rate captures the purchasing power a nation enjoys in the international marketplace. Official exchange rates, however, can be artifically fixed and/or subject to manipulation - resulting in claims of the country having an under- or over-valued currency - and are not necessarily the equivalent of a market-determined exchange rate. Moreover, even if the official exchange rate is market-determined, market exchange rates are frequently established by a relatively small set of goods and services (the ones the country trades) and may not capture the value of the larger set of goods the country produces. Furthermore, OER-converted GDP is not well suited to comparing domestic GDP over time, since appreciation/depreciation from one year to the next will make the OER GDP value rise/fall regardless of whether home-currency-denominated GDP changed.
  • Industrial > Production growth rate: The annual percentage increase in industrial production (includes manufacturing, mining, and construction).
  • Labor force > By occupation > Agriculture: This entry is derived from Economy > Labor force > By occupation, which lists the percentage distribution of the labor force by sector of occupation. Agriculture includes farming, fishing, and forestry. Industry includes mining, manufacturing, energy production, and construction. Services cover government activities, communications, transportation, finance, and all other economic activities that do not produce material goods. The distribution will total less than 100 percent if the data are incomplete and may range from 99-101 percent due to rounding.
    Additional details:
    • Gibraltar: negligible (2013)


  • Taxes and other revenues: This entry records total taxes and other revenues received by the national government during the time period indicated, expressed as a percent of GDP. Taxes include personal and corporate income taxes, value added taxes, excise taxes, and tariffs. Other revenues include social contributions - such as payments for social security and hospital insurance - grants, and net revenues from public enterprises. Normalizing the data, by dividing total revenues by GDP, enables easy comparisons across countries, and provides an average rate at which all income (GDP) is paid to the national level government for the supply of public goods and services.
  • Gross domestic savings > Current US$ per capita: Gross domestic savings are calculated as GDP less final consumption expenditure (total consumption). Data are in current U.S. dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Debt > External per capita: Total public and private debt owed to non-residents repayable in foreign currency, goods, or services. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Tax > Tax rates: Revenue is cash receipts from taxes, social contributions, and other revenues such as fines, fees, rent, and income from property or sales. Grants are also considered as revenue but are excluded here."
  • Investment > Gross fixed: This entry records total business spending on fixed assets, such as factories, machinery, equipment, dwellings, and inventories of raw materials, which provide the basis for future production. It is measured gross of the depreciation of the assets, i.e., it includes invesment that merely replaces worn-out or scrapped capital.
  • Imports > Partners: This entry provides a rank ordering of trading partners starting with the most important; it sometimes includes the percent of total dollar value.
  • GDP per person: GDP per capita is gross domestic product divided by midyear population. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Tax > Tax payments > Number: Tax payments (number). Tax payments by businesses are the total number of taxes paid by businesses, including electronic filing. The tax is counted as paid once a year even if payments are more frequent.
  • Trade > Imports per capita: This entry provides the total US dollar amount of merchandise imports on a c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight) or f.o.b. (free on board) basis. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Reserves of foreign exchange and gold per capita: This entry gives the dollar value for the stock of all financial assets that are available to the central monetary authority for use in meeting a country's balance of payments needs as of the end-date of the period specified. This category includes not only foreign currency and gold, but also a country's holdings of Special Drawing Rights in the International Monetary Fund, and its reserve position in the Fund. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Currency: The national medium of exchange and its basic sub-unit.
  • Budget > Revenues > Per capita: Revenues calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Poverty > Population under $1 a day: Population below line - proportion receiving less than $1 per day in income (purchasing power parity). Data from most recent available between the period 1983 to 2000.
  • Real interest rate: Real interest rate is the lending interest rate adjusted for inflation as measured by the GDP deflator.
  • GDP > Official exchange rate per capita: This entry gives the gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. A nation's GDP at offical exchange rates (OER) is the home-currency-denominated annual GDP figure divided by the bilateral average US exchange rate with that country in that year. The measure is simple to compute and gives a precise measure of the value of output. Many economists prefer this measure when gauging the economic power an economy maintains vis-a-vis its neighbors, judging that an exchange rate captures the purchasing power a nation enjoys in the international marketplace. Official exchange rates, however, can be artifically fixed and/or subject to manipulation - resulting in claims of the country having an under- or over-valued currency - and are not necessarily the equivalent of a market-determined exchange rate. Moreover, even if the official exchange rate is market-determined, market exchange rates are frequently established by a relatively small set of goods and services (the ones the country trades) and may not capture the value of the larger set of goods the country produces. Furthermore, OER-converted GDP is not well suited to comparing domestic GDP over time, since appreciation/depreciation from one year to the next will make the OER GDP value rise/fall regardless of whether home-currency-denominated GDP changed. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • GDP > Composition, by end use > Exports of goods and services: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by end use, which shows who does the spending in an economy: consumers, businesses, government, and foreigners. The distribution gives the percentage contribution to total GDP of household consumption, government consumption, investment in fixed capital, investment in inventories, exports of goods and services, and imports of goods and services, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete.
    household consumption consists of expenditures by resident households, and by nonprofit institutions that serve households, on goods and services that are consumed by individuals. This includes consumption of both domestically produced and foreign goods and services.
    government consumption consists of government expenditures on goods and services. These figures exclude government transfer payments, such as interest on debt, unemployment, and social security, since such payments are not made in exchange for goods and services supplied.
    investment in fixed capital consists of total business spending on fixed assets, such as factories, machinery, equipment, dwellings, and inventories of raw materials, which provide the basis for future production. It is measured gross of the depreciation of the assets, i.e., it includes investment that merely replaces worn-out or scrapped capital. Earlier editions of The World Factbook referred to this concept as Investment (gross fixed) and that data now have been moved to this new field.
    investment in inventories consists of net changes to the stock of outputs that are still held by the units that produce them, awaiting further sale to an end user, such as automobiles sitting on a dealer’s lot or groceries on the store shelves. This figure may be positive or negative. If the stock of unsold output increases during the relevant time period, investment in inventories is positive, but, if the stock of unsold goods declines, it will be negative. Investment in inventories normally is an early indicator of the state of the economy. If the stock of unsold items increases unexpectedly – because people stop buying - the economy may be entering a recession; but if the stock of unsold items falls - and goods "go flying off the shelves" - businesses normally try to replace those stocks, and the economy is likely to accelerate.
    exports of goods and services consist of sales, barter, gifts, or grants of goods and services from residents to nonresidents.
    imports of goods and ...
    Full definition
     .
  • Poverty and inequality > Richest quintile to poorest quintile ratio: The ratio of average income of the richest 20% of the population to the average income of the poorest 20% of the population.
  • GDP > Composition, by end use > Household consumption: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by end use, which shows who does the spending in an economy: consumers, businesses, government, and foreigners. The distribution gives the percentage contribution to total GDP of household consumption, government consumption, investment in fixed capital, investment in inventories, exports of goods and services, and imports of goods and services, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete.
    household consumption consists of expenditures by resident households, and by nonprofit institutions that serve households, on goods and services that are consumed by individuals. This includes consumption of both domestically produced and foreign goods and services.
    government consumption consists of government expenditures on goods and services. These figures exclude government transfer payments, such as interest on debt, unemployment, and social security, since such payments are not made in exchange for goods and services supplied.
    investment in fixed capital consists of total business spending on fixed assets, such as factories, machinery, equipment, dwellings, and inventories of raw materials, which provide the basis for future production. It is measured gross of the depreciation of the assets, i.e., it includes investment that merely replaces worn-out or scrapped capital. Earlier editions of The World Factbook referred to this concept as Investment (gross fixed) and that data now have been moved to this new field.
    investment in inventories consists of net changes to the stock of outputs that are still held by the units that produce them, awaiting further sale to an end user, such as automobiles sitting on a dealer’s lot or groceries on the store shelves. This figure may be positive or negative. If the stock of unsold output increases during the relevant time period, investment in inventories is positive, but, if the stock of unsold goods declines, it will be negative. Investment in inventories normally is an early indicator of the state of the economy. If the stock of unsold items increases unexpectedly – because people stop buying - the economy may be entering a recession; but if the stock of unsold items falls - and goods "go flying off the shelves" - businesses normally try to replace those stocks, and the economy is likely to accelerate.
    exports of goods and services consist of sales, barter, gifts, or grants of goods and services from residents to nonresidents.
    imports of goods and ...
    Full definition
    .
  • Labor force > By occupation > Services: This entry is derived from Economy > Labor force > By occupation, which lists the percentage distribution of the labor force by sector of occupation. Agriculture includes farming, fishing, and forestry. Industry includes mining, manufacturing, energy production, and construction. Services cover government activities, communications, transportation, finance, and all other economic activities that do not produce material goods. The distribution will total less than 100 percent if the data are incomplete and may range from 99-101 percent due to rounding.
  • Companies > Listed domestic companies, total: Listed domestic companies, total. Listed domestic companies are the domestically incorporated companies listed on the country's stock exchanges at the end of the year. This indicator does not include investment companies, mutual funds, or other collective investment vehicles.
  • Outbound tourist spending: International tourism expenditures are expenditures of international outbound visitors in other countries, including payments to foreign carriers for international transport. These expenditures may include those by residents traveling abroad as same-day visitors, except in cases where these are important enough to justify separate classification. For some countries they do not include expenditures for passenger transport items. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • GDP > Composition, by sector of origin > Agriculture: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by sector of origin, which shows where production takes place in an economy. The distribution gives the percentage contribution of agriculture, industry, and services to total GDP, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete. Agriculture includes farming, fishing, and forestry. Industry includes mining, manufacturing, energy production, and construction. Services cover government activities, communications, transportation, finance, and all other private economic activities that do not produce material goods.
  • GNI > Current US$ per capita: GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Inflation: Consumer price index reflects changes in the cost to the average consumer of acquiring a basket of goods and services that may be fixed or changed at specified intervals, such as yearly. The Laspeyres formula is generally used."
  • Deposit interest rate: Deposit interest rate is the rate paid by commercial or similar banks for demand, time, or savings deposits.
  • Trade > Exports > By good > Passenger cars etc: Exports of Passenger cars etc, by country, in thousands USD
  • GDP > Composition, by sector of origin > Industry: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by sector of origin, which shows where production takes place in an economy. The distribution gives the percentage contribution of agriculture, industry, and services to total GDP, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete. Agriculture includes farming, fishing, and forestry. Industry includes mining, manufacturing, energy production, and construction. Services cover government activities, communications, transportation, finance, and all other private economic activities that do not produce material goods.
  • Foreign direct investment > Net > BoP > Current US$ per capita: Foreign direct investment is net inflows of investment to acquire a lasting management interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than that of the investor. It is the sum of equity capital, reinvestment of earnings, other long-term capital, and short-term capital as shown in the balance of payments. This series shows total net, that is, net FDI in the reporting economy from foreign sources less net FDI by the reporting economy to the rest of the world. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Tax > GDP per capita > Constant LCU: GDP per capita (constant LCU). GDP per capita is gross domestic product divided by midyear population. GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant local currency.
  • Imports per capita: This entry provides the total US dollar amount of merchandise imports on a c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight) or f.o.b. (free on board) basis. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Tourism > International tourism, number of arrivals: International tourism, number of arrivals. International inbound tourists (overnight visitors) are the number of tourists who travel to a country other than that in which they have their usual residence, but outside their usual environment, for a period not exceeding 12 months and whose main purpose in visiting is other than an activity remunerated from within the country visited. When data on number of tourists are not available, the number of visitors, which includes tourists, same-day visitors, cruise passengers, and crew members, is shown instead. Sources and collection methods for arrivals differ across countries. In some cases data are from border statistics (police, immigration, and the like) and supplemented by border surveys. In other cases data are from tourism accommodation establishments. For some countries number of arrivals is limited to arrivals by air and for others to arrivals staying in hotels. Some countries include arrivals of nationals residing abroad while others do not. Caution should thus be used in comparing arrivals across countries. The data on inbound tourists refer to the number of arrivals, not to the number of people traveling. Thus a person who makes several trips to a country during a given period is counted each time as a new arrival.
  • Trade > Exports: The total US dollar amount of exports on an f.o.b. (free on board) basis.
  • Tax > Taxes on income, profits and capital gains > Current LCU: Taxes on income, profits and capital gains (current LCU). Taxes on income, profits, and capital gains are levied on the actual or presumptive net income of individuals, on the profits of corporations and enterprises, and on capital gains, whether realized or not, on land, securities, and other assets. Intragovernmental payments are eliminated in consolidation.
  • Financial sector > Exchange rates and prices > GDP deflator > Base year varies by country: The GDP implicit deflator is the ratio of GDP in current local currency to GDP in constant local currency. The base year varies by country.
  • Trade > Imports: This entry provides the total US dollar amount of merchandise imports on a c.i.f. (cost, insurance, and freight) or f.o.b. (free on board) basis. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms.
  • Currency > GDP > Constant 2000 US$ per capita: GDP (constant 2000 US$). GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant 2005 U.S. dollars. Dollar figures for GDP are converted from domestic currencies using 2000 official exchange rates. For a few countries where the official exchange rate does not reflect the rate effectively applied to actual foreign exchange transactions, an alternative conversion factor is used. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Income > GNI per capita, PPP > Current international $: GNI per capita, PPP (current international $). GNI per capita based on purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP GNI is gross national income (GNI) converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GNI as a U.S. dollar has in the United States. GNI is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current international dollars.
  • Aid per capita > Current US$: Aid per capita includes both official development assistance (ODA) and official aid, and is calculated by dividing total aid by the midyear population estimate.
  • Poverty > Share of all poor people: The percentage of the world's total poor who live in each nation. 'Poor' here is defined as lving below the global poverty line of US$1 per day.
  • Economy growth: Measures growth in the economy or ""economy growth"". Annual percentage growth rate of GDP at market prices based on constant local currency. Aggregates are based on constant 2000 U.S. dollars. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources."
  • GDP > By type of expenditure > Household consumption expenditure: GDP by Type of Expenditure at current prices - US dollars.
  • Retail > Gross value added by wholesale, retail trade, restaurants and hotels: Gross Value Added by Kind of Economic Activity at current prices - US dollars.
  • Trade > Exports > Per $ GDP: The total US dollar amount of exports on an f.o.b. (free on board) basis. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 $ gross domestic product.
  • Debt > Central government debt, total > Current LCU: Central government debt, total (current LCU). Debt is the entire stock of direct government fixed-term contractual obligations to others outstanding on a particular date. It includes domestic and foreign liabilities such as currency and money deposits, securities other than shares, and loans. It is the gross amount of government liabilities reduced by the amount of equity and financial derivatives held by the government. Because debt is a stock rather than a flow, it is measured as of a given date, usually the last day of the fiscal year.
  • GDP > Composition, by end use > Government consumption: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by end use, which shows who does the spending in an economy: consumers, businesses, government, and foreigners. The distribution gives the percentage contribution to total GDP of household consumption, government consumption, investment in fixed capital, investment in inventories, exports of goods and services, and imports of goods and services, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete.
    household consumption consists of expenditures by resident households, and by nonprofit institutions that serve households, on goods and services that are consumed by individuals. This includes consumption of both domestically produced and foreign goods and services.
    government consumption consists of government expenditures on goods and services. These figures exclude government transfer payments, such as interest on debt, unemployment, and social security, since such payments are not made in exchange for goods and services supplied.
    investment in fixed capital consists of total business spending on fixed assets, such as factories, machinery, equipment, dwellings, and inventories of raw materials, which provide the basis for future production. It is measured gross of the depreciation of the assets, i.e., it includes investment that merely replaces worn-out or scrapped capital. Earlier editions of The World Factbook referred to this concept as Investment (gross fixed) and that data now have been moved to this new field.
    investment in inventories consists of net changes to the stock of outputs that are still held by the units that produce them, awaiting further sale to an end user, such as automobiles sitting on a dealer’s lot or groceries on the store shelves. This figure may be positive or negative. If the stock of unsold output increases during the relevant time period, investment in inventories is positive, but, if the stock of unsold goods declines, it will be negative. Investment in inventories normally is an early indicator of the state of the economy. If the stock of unsold items increases unexpectedly – because people stop buying - the economy may be entering a recession; but if the stock of unsold items falls - and goods "go flying off the shelves" - businesses normally try to replace those stocks, and the economy is likely to accelerate.
    exports of goods and services consist of sales, barter, gifts, or grants of goods and services from residents to nonresidents.
    imports of goods and ...
    Full definition






  • New businesses registered > Number > Per capita: New businesses registered are the number of new firms, defined as firms registered in the current year of reporting." Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Companies > Ease of doing business index > 1=most business-friendly regulations: Ease of doing business index (1=most business-friendly regulations). Ease of doing business ranks economies from 1 to 189, with first place being the best. A high ranking (a low numerical rank) means that the regulatory environment is conducive to business operation. The index averages the country's percentile rankings on 10 topics covered in the World Bank's Doing Business. The ranking on each topic is the simple average of the percentile rankings on its component indicators.
  • Interest rate spread > Lending rate minus deposit rate: Interest rate spread is the interest rate charged by banks on loans to prime customers minus the interest rate paid by commercial or similar banks for demand, time, or savings deposits.
  • Industrial production growth rate: This entry gives the annual percentage increase in industrial production (includes manufacturing, mining, and construction).
  • GDP > PPP: Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) in Millions of International Dollars, 2004.
  • Poverty > Population under $2 a day: Population below line - proportion receiving less than $2 per day in income (purchasing power parity). Data from most recent available between the period 1983 to 2000.
  • Trade > Imports > By good > Passenger cars etc: Imports of Passenger cars etc, by country, in thousands USD
  • Reserves of foreign exchange and gold: This entry gives the dollar value for the stock of all financial assets that are available to the central monetary authority for use in meeting a country's balance of payments needs as of the end-date of the period specified. This category includes not only foreign currency and gold, but also a country's holdings of Special Drawing Rights in the International Monetary Fund, and its reserve position in the Fund.
  • GDP deflator: The GDP implicit deflator is the ratio of GDP in current local currency to GDP in constant local currency. The base year varies by country.
  • GDP per capita > Constant LCU: GDP per capita is gross domestic product divided by midyear population. GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant local currency.
  • Income > GNI per capita, PPP > Constant 2005 international $: GNI per capita, PPP (constant 2005 international $). GNI per capita based on purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP GNI is gross national income (GNI) converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GNI as a U.S. dollar has in the United States. GNI is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in constant 2005 international dollars.
  • International tourism > Number of arrivals: International inbound tourists (overnight visitors) are the number of tourists who travel to a country other than that in which they have their usual residence, but outside their usual environment, for a period not exceeding 12 months and whose main purpose in visiting is other than an activity remunerated from within the country visited.
  • Size of economy > Share of world GDP : Percent of world GDP (exchange rates).

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Economic growth > Per capita: Annual percentage growth rate of GDP per capita based on constant local currency. GDP per capita is gross domestic product divided by midyear population. GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources.
  • Currency > Monetary unit: Country currency.
  • Micro > Small and medium enterprises > Number > Per capita: Micro, small, and medium-size enterprises are business that may be defined by the number of employees. There is no international standard definition of firm size; however, many institutions that collect information use the following size categories: micro enterprises have 0-9 employees, small enterprises have 10-49 employees, and medium-size enterprises have 50-249 employees. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Household final > Consumption expenditure > Current US$ per capita: Household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption) is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Balance of payments > Capital and financial account > Foreign direct investment > Net inflows > BoP > Current US: Foreign direct investment are the net inflows of investment to acquire a lasting management interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than that of the investor. It is the sum of equity capital, reinvestment of earnings, other long-term capital, and short-term capital as shown in the balance of payments. This series shows net inflows (new investment inflows less disinvestment) in the reporting economy from foreign investors. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • Budget > Revenues per capita: Revenues calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Poverty and inequality > Causes of poverty > Living Standards: Percentage living standards count for in the country's total Multidimensional Poverty Index (UN). For instance, poor living standards are only 27% of Senegal's poverty issues, while the remaining 73% is for health and education. Cross country comparisons based off these numbers aren't an accurate telling of how poor living standards are between countries, but rather how much of an issue poor living standards are in each country.
  • International tourism > Number of departures: International outbound tourists are the number of departures that people make from their country of usual residence to any other country for any purpose other than a remunerated activity in the country visited.
  • Labor force > By occupation > Industry: This entry is derived from Economy > Labor force > By occupation, which lists the percentage distribution of the labor force by sector of occupation. Agriculture includes farming, fishing, and forestry. Industry includes mining, manufacturing, energy production, and construction. Services cover government activities, communications, transportation, finance, and all other economic activities that do not produce material goods. The distribution will total less than 100 percent if the data are incomplete and may range from 99-101 percent due to rounding.
  • Reserves > Total reserves > Includes gold, current US$: Total reserves (includes gold, current US$). Total reserves comprise holdings of monetary gold, special drawing rights, reserves of IMF members held by the IMF, and holdings of foreign exchange under the control of monetary authorities. The gold component of these reserves is valued at year-end (December 31) London prices. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Income > Household final consumption expenditure, PPP > Constant 2005 international $: Household final consumption expenditure, PPP (constant 2005 international $). Household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption) is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country. Data are converted to constant 2005 international dollars using purchasing power parity rates.
  • Income > GDP per capita, PPP > Current international $: GDP per capita, PPP (current international $). GDP per capita based on purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current international dollars.
  • GDP > Composition, by end use > Imports of goods and services: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by end use, which shows who does the spending in an economy: consumers, businesses, government, and foreigners. The distribution gives the percentage contribution to total GDP of household consumption, government consumption, investment in fixed capital, investment in inventories, exports of goods and services, and imports of goods and services, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete.
    household consumption consists of expenditures by resident households, and by nonprofit institutions that serve households, on goods and services that are consumed by individuals. This includes consumption of both domestically produced and foreign goods and services.
    government consumption consists of government expenditures on goods and services. These figures exclude government transfer payments, such as interest on debt, unemployment, and social security, since such payments are not made in exchange for goods and services supplied.
    investment in fixed capital consists of total business spending on fixed assets, such as factories, machinery, equipment, dwellings, and inventories of raw materials, which provide the basis for future production. It is measured gross of the depreciation of the assets, i.e., it includes investment that merely replaces worn-out or scrapped capital. Earlier editions of The World Factbook referred to this concept as Investment (gross fixed) and that data now have been moved to this new field.
    investment in inventories consists of net changes to the stock of outputs that are still held by the units that produce them, awaiting further sale to an end user, such as automobiles sitting on a dealer’s lot or groceries on the store shelves. This figure may be positive or negative. If the stock of unsold output increases during the relevant time period, investment in inventories is positive, but, if the stock of unsold goods declines, it will be negative. Investment in inventories normally is an early indicator of the state of the economy. If the stock of unsold items increases unexpectedly – because people stop buying - the economy may be entering a recession; but if the stock of unsold items falls - and goods "go flying off the shelves" - businesses normally try to replace those stocks, and the economy is likely to accelerate.
    exports of goods and services consist of sales, barter, gifts, or grants of goods and services from residents to nonresidents.
    imports of goods and ...
    Full definition






  • International tourism > Expenditures > Current US$ per capita: International tourism expenditures are expenditures of international outbound visitors in other countries, including payments to foreign carriers for international transport. These may include expenditures by residents traveling abroad as same-day visitors, except in cases where these are so important as to justify a separate classification. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Gross national saving: Gross national saving is derived by deducting final consumption expenditure (household plus government) from Gross national disposable income, and consists of personal saving, plus business saving (the sum of the capital consumption allowance and retained business profits), plus government saving (the excess of tax revenues over expenditures), but excludes foreign saving (the excess of imports of goods and services over exports). The figures are presented as a percent of GDP. A negative number indicates that the economy as a whole is spending more income than it produces, thus drawing down national wealth (dissaving).
  • Debt > Net foreign assets > Current LCU: Net foreign assets (current LCU). Net foreign assets are the sum of foreign assets held by monetary authorities and deposit money banks, less their foreign liabilities. Data are in current local currency.
  • Companies > Listed domestic companies, total per million: Listed domestic companies, total. Listed domestic companies are the domestically incorporated companies listed on the country's stock exchanges at the end of the year. This indicator does not include investment companies, mutual funds, or other collective investment vehicles. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Companies > Stock market > Stocks traded, total value > Current US$: Stocks traded, total value (current US$). Stocks traded refers to the total value of shares traded during the period.
  • GDP > Composition, by end use > Investment in fixed capital: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by end use, which shows who does the spending in an economy: consumers, businesses, government, and foreigners. The distribution gives the percentage contribution to total GDP of household consumption, government consumption, investment in fixed capital, investment in inventories, exports of goods and services, and imports of goods and services, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete.
    household consumption consists of expenditures by resident households, and by nonprofit institutions that serve households, on goods and services that are consumed by individuals. This includes consumption of both domestically produced and foreign goods and services.
    government consumption consists of government expenditures on goods and services. These figures exclude government transfer payments, such as interest on debt, unemployment, and social security, since such payments are not made in exchange for goods and services supplied.
    investment in fixed capital consists of total business spending on fixed assets, such as factories, machinery, equipment, dwellings, and inventories of raw materials, which provide the basis for future production. It is measured gross of the depreciation of the assets, i.e., it includes investment that merely replaces worn-out or scrapped capital. Earlier editions of The World Factbook referred to this concept as Investment (gross fixed) and that data now have been moved to this new field.
    investment in inventories consists of net changes to the stock of outputs that are still held by the units that produce them, awaiting further sale to an end user, such as automobiles sitting on a dealer’s lot or groceries on the store shelves. This figure may be positive or negative. If the stock of unsold output increases during the relevant time period, investment in inventories is positive, but, if the stock of unsold goods declines, it will be negative. Investment in inventories normally is an early indicator of the state of the economy. If the stock of unsold items increases unexpectedly – because people stop buying - the economy may be entering a recession; but if the stock of unsold items falls - and goods "go flying off the shelves" - businesses normally try to replace those stocks, and the economy is likely to accelerate.
    exports of goods and services consist of sales, barter, gifts, or grants of goods and services from residents to nonresidents.
    imports of goods and ...
    Full definition
    .
  • Tax > Taxes on international trade > Current LCU: Taxes on international trade (current LCU). Taxes on international trade include import duties, export duties, profits of export or import monopolies, exchange profits, and exchange taxes.
  • Poverty and inequality > Population below $1 (PPP) per day: Percentage of population that lives on less than the equivalent of 1 USD per day.
  • GDP > Constant 2000 US$: GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars. Dollar figures for GDP are converted from domestic currencies using 2000 official exchange rates. For a few countries where the official exchange rate does not reflect the rate effectively applied to actual foreign exchange transactions, an alternative conversion factor is used.
  • Patents granted: Patents granted to residents per million people 1998.
  • Government spending: General government final consumption expenditure (formerly general government consumption) includes all government current expenditures for purchases of goods and services (including compensation of employees). It also includes most expenditures on national defense and security, but excludes government military expenditures that are part of government capital formation. Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars."
  • Gross domestic savings: Gross domestic savings are calculated as GDP less final consumption expenditure (total consumption). Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Bank liquid > Reserves to bank assets ratio: Ratio of bank liquid reserves to bank assets is the ratio of domestic currency holdings and deposits with the monetary authorities to claims on other governments, nonfinancial public enterprises, the private sector, and other banking institutions.
  • Debt > Government debt > Gross government debt, share of GDP: Gross government debt as % of GDP (IMF).

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Companies > Market capitalization of listed companies > Current US$: Market capitalization of listed companies (current US$). Market capitalization (also known as market value) is the share price times the number of shares outstanding. Listed domestic companies are the domestically incorporated companies listed on the country's stock exchanges at the end of the year. Listed companies does not include investment companies, mutual funds, or other collective investment vehicles. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Debt > External > Per $ GDP: Total public and private debt owed to non-residents repayable in foreign currency, goods, or services. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • Tax > Taxes on income, profits and capital gains > Current LCU per capita: Taxes on income, profits and capital gains (current LCU). Taxes on income, profits, and capital gains are levied on the actual or presumptive net income of individuals, on the profits of corporations and enterprises, and on capital gains, whether realized or not, on land, securities, and other assets. Intragovernmental payments are eliminated in consolidation. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Tax > GDP > Current LCU: GDP (current LCU). GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current local currency.
  • Currency > GDP > Constant 2000 US$: GDP (constant 2000 US$). GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant 2005 U.S. dollars. Dollar figures for GDP are converted from domestic currencies using 2000 official exchange rates. For a few countries where the official exchange rate does not reflect the rate effectively applied to actual foreign exchange transactions, an alternative conversion factor is used.
  • Stock of direct foreign investment > At home: This entry gives the cumulative US dollar value of all investments in the home country made directly by residents - primarily companies - of other countries as of the end of the time period indicated. Direct investment excludes investment through purchase of shares.
  • Business > Companies > Specific companies > Carrefour > First store: Year in which Carrefour first entered each country.
  • Debt > Interest rates > Central bank discount rate: Compares the annualized interest rate set by centrals banks over loans requested by commercial banks to meet temporary shortages of funds. Through these loans, central banks can influence the commercial banks' interest rates as a tool of monetary policy. Usually their interest rates are lower than the ones offered by commercial banks, which lend it at a higher rate to make their profit.
  • Balance of payments > Capital and financial account > Portfolio investment > Excluding LCFAR > BoP > Current US$: Portfolio investment excluding liabilities constituting foreign authorities' reserves covers transactions in equity securities and debt securities. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • GNI: GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Debt > IMF charges > INT, current US$: IMF charges (INT, current US$). IMF charges cover interest payments with respect to all uses of IMF resources, excluding those resulting from drawings in the reserve tranche. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Poverty and inequality > Causes of poverty > Education: Percentage education counts for in the country's total Multidimensional Poverty Index (UN). For instance, education is only 31% of Senegal's poverty issues, while the remaining 69% is for living standards and health. Cross country comparisons based off these numbers aren't an accurate telling of how poor education is between countries, but rather how much of an issue poor education is in each country.
  • Trade balance with US: In US dollars. Jan 2003 - March 2003
  • Lending interest rate: Lending interest rate is the rate charged by banks on loans to prime customers.
  • GDP growth > Duration 1980-2000: Gross domestic product GDP growth rate from 1980 to 2000
  • GDP > Current LCU: GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current local currency.
  • Income > Health expenditure per capita, PPP > Constant 2005 international $: Health expenditure per capita, PPP (constant 2005 international $). Total health expenditure is the sum of public and private health expenditures as a ratio of total population. It covers the provision of health services (preventive and curative), family planning activities, nutrition activities, and emergency aid designated for health but does not include provision of water and sanitation. Data are in international dollars converted using 2005 purchasing power parity (PPP) rates.
  • GDP > PPP per capita: Purchasing Power Parity (PPP) in Millions of International Dollars, 2004. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Total > Reserves in months of imports: Total reserves comprise holdings of monetary gold, special drawing rights, reserves of IMF members held by the IMF, and holdings of foreign exchange under the control of monetary authorities. The gold component of these reserves is valued at year-end (December 31) London prices. This item shows reserves expressed in terms of the number of months of imports of goods and services which could be paid for.
  • Income > GDP, PPP > Current international $: GDP, PPP (current international $). PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current international dollars.
  • Inflation > Consumer price index > 2005 = 100: Consumer price index (2005 = 100). Consumer price index reflects changes in the cost to the average consumer of acquiring a basket of goods and services that may be fixed or changed at specified intervals, such as yearly. The Laspeyres formula is generally used.
  • Companies > Trademark applications, total: Trademark applications, total. Trademark applications filed are applications to register a trademark with a national or regional Intellectual Property (IP) office. A trademark is a distinctive sign which identifies certain goods or services as those produced or provided by a specific person or enterprise. A trademark provides protection to the owner of the mark by ensuring the exclusive right to use it to identify goods or services, or to authorize another to use it in return for payment. The period of protection varies, but a trademark can be renewed indefinitely beyond the time limit on payment of additional fees.
  • Money and quasi money > M2 > Current LCU: Money and quasi money comprise the sum of currency outside banks, demand deposits other than those of the central government, and the time, savings, and foreign currency deposits of resident sectors other than the central government. This definition of money supply is frequently called M2; it corresponds to lines 34 and 35 in the International Monetary Fund's (IMF) International Financial Statistics (IFS). Data are in current local currency.
  • Labor force per thousand people: This entry contains the total labor force figure. Figures expressed per thousand people for the same year.
  • Royalty and license fees > Payments > BoP > Current US$: Royalty and license fees are payments and receipts between residents and nonresidents for the authorized use of intangible, nonproduced, nonfinancial assets and proprietary rights (such as patents, copyrights, trademarks, industrial processes, and franchises) and for the use, through licensing agreements, of produced originals of prototypes (such as films and manuscripts). Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Net income > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita: Net income refers to receipts and payments of employee compensation paid to nonresident workers and investment income (receipts and payments on direct investment, portfolio investment, other investments, and receipts on reserve assets). Income derived from the use of intangible assets is recorded under business services. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Economic aid > Recipient: This entry, which is subject to major problems of definition and statistical coverage, refers to the net inflow of Official Development Finance (ODF) to recipient countries. The figure includes assistance from the World Bank, the IMF, and other international organizations and from individual nation donors. Formal commitments of aid are included in the data. Omitted from the data are grants by private organizations. Aid comes in various forms including outright grants and loans. The entry thus is the difference between new inflows and repayments.
  • Current transfers > Receipts > BoP > Current US$: Current transfers (receipts) are recorded in the balance of payments whenever an economy receives goods, services, income, or financial items without a quid pro quo. All transfers not considered to be capital are current. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Tourism > International tourism, number of departures: International tourism, number of departures. International outbound tourists are the number of departures that people make from their country of usual residence to any other country for any purpose other than a remunerated activity in the country visited. The data on outbound tourists refer to the number of departures, not to the number of people traveling. Thus a person who makes several trips from a country during a given period is counted each time as a new departure.
  • Government > Revenue > Tax revenue as percentage of GDP: Heritage Foundation (2012).
  • Entrepreneurship > Starting a Business > Index ranking: Doing Business records all generic procedures that are officially required for an entrepreneur to start up and operate an industrial or commercial business. These include obtaining all necessary licenses and permits and completing any required notifications, verifications or inscriptions with relevant authorities. After a study of laws, regulations and publicly available information on business entry, a detailed list of procedures, time, cost and paid-in minimum capital requirements is developed. Subsequently, local incorporation lawyers and government officials complete and verify the data on applicable procedures, the time and cost of complying with each procedure under normal circumstances and the paid-in minimum capital. On average 4 law firms participate in each country. Information is also collected on the sequence in which procedures are to be completed and whether procedures may be carried out simultaneously. It is assumed that any required information is readily available and that all government and nongovernment agencies involved in the start-up process function efficiently and without corruption. If answers by local experts differ, inquiries continue until the data are reconciled. NOTE: This is a ranking derived from several indicators, 1 being the best (ranked first). The higher the number on this graph, the lower their overall ranking. Invert this graph by clicking on 'Amount' at the top. Consult source for details on methodology.
  • Net barter terms of trade: Net barter terms of trade are the ratio of the export price index to the corresponding import price index measured relative to the base year 2000.
    2000 = 100
  • High-technology > Exports > Current US$ > Per capita: High-technology exports are products with high research and development intensity, such as in aerospace, computers, pharmaceuticals, scientific instruments, and electrical machinery. Data are in current U.S. dollars." Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Poverty > Gap at $1 a day > PPP: Poverty gap is the mean shortfall from the poverty line (counting the nonpoor as having zero shortfall), expressed as a percentage of the poverty line. This measure reflects the depth of poverty as well as its incidence. Data showing as 0.5 signifies a poverty gap of less than 0.5 percent.
  • Household spending per capita: Household final consumption expenditure per capita (private consumption per capita) is calculated using private consumption in constant 2000 prices and World Bank population estimates. Household final consumption expenditure is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country. Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars."
  • Balance of payments > Current account > Balances > Current account balance > Current US$: Current account balance is the sum of net exports of goods, services, net income, and net current transfers. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • International tourism > Receipts > Current US$: International tourism receipts are expenditures by international inbound visitors, including payments to national carriers for international transport. These receipts should include any other prepayment made for goods or services received in the destination country. They also may include receipts from same-day visitors, except in cases where these are so important as to justify a separate classification. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Companies > Stock market > Business extent of disclosure index > 0=less disclosure to 10=more disclosure: Business extent of disclosure index (0=less disclosure to 10=more disclosure). Disclosure index measures the extent to which investors are protected through disclosure of ownership and financial information. The index ranges from 0 to 10, with higher values indicating more disclosure.
  • Net capital account > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Net capital account includes government debt forgiveness, investment grants in cash or in kind by a government entity, and taxes on capital transfers. Also included are migrants' capital transfers and debt forgiveness and investment grants by nongovernmental entities. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • Trade > Exports > By good > Chocolate cocoa preparations: Exports of Chocolate/cocoa preparations, by country, in thousands USD
  • Poverty and inequality > Inequality adjusted income index: Inequality-adjusted Human Development Index.
  • Development > Human Development Index: Human Development Index trends, 1980-2012.
  • Foreign direct investment > Net inflows > BoP > Current US$: Foreign direct investment are the net inflows of investment to acquire a lasting management interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than that of the investor. It is the sum of equity capital, reinvestment of earnings, other long-term capital, and short-term capital as shown in the balance of payments. This series shows net inflows in the reporting economy. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Income > GNI, PPP > Current international $ per capita: GNI, PPP (current international $). PPP GNI (formerly PPP GNP) is gross national income (GNI) converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GNI as a U.S. dollar has in the United States. Gross national income is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current international dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Business > Companies > Specific companies > Carrefour > Hard Discounters: Amount of shops of the type “hard discounter” Carrefour has per country. Carrefour's brands Dia, Ed and Minipreço are considered hard discounters.
  • Debt > Banks > Automated teller machines > ATMs > Per 100,000 adults: Automated teller machines (ATMs) (per 100,000 adults). Automated teller machines are computerized telecommunications devices that provide clients of a financial institution with access to financial transactions in a public place.
  • Royalty and license fees > Receipts > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Royalty and license fees are payments and receipts between residents and nonresidents for the authorized use of intangible, nonproduced, nonfinancial assets and proprietary rights (such as patents, copyrights, trademarks, industrial processes, and franchises) and for the use, through licensing agreements, of produced originals of prototypes (such as films and manuscripts). Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 million $ gross domestic product.
  • Trade > Imports > By good > Silver platinum etc: Imports of Silver/platinum etc, by country, in thousands USD
  • Debt > Net domestic credit > Current LCU: Net domestic credit (current LCU). Net domestic credit is the sum of net claims on the central government and claims on other sectors of the domestic economy (IFS line 32). Data are in current local currency.
  • Tax > GDP per capita > Current LCU: GDP per capita (current LCU). GDP per capita is gross domestic product divided by midyear population. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current local currency.
  • Size of economy > GDP > GDP growth: GDP growth (annual %).
  • Tax > GDP > Constant LCU: GDP (constant LCU). GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant local currency.
  • GDP > PPP > Constant 2000 international $ per capita: PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant 2000 international dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Current account balance per capita: This entry records a country's net trade in goods and services, plus net earnings from rents, interest, profits, and dividends, and net transfer payments (such as pension funds and worker remittances) to and from the rest of the world during the period specified. These figures are calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Entrepreneurship > Hiring and Firing > Index ranking: Every economy has established a complex system of laws and institutions intended to protect the interests of workers and to guarantee a minimum standard of living for its population. The OECD Job Study and the International Encyclopedia for Labour Law and Industrial Relations identify 4 areas subject to statutory regulation in all countries: employment, social security, industrial relations and occupational health and safety. Doing Business focuses on the regulation of employment, specifically the hiring and firing of workers and the rigidity of working hours. This year data on social security payments by the employer and pension benefits, including the mandatory retirement age, have been added. The data on hiring and firing workers are based on a detailed survey of employment and social security regulations. The survey is completed by local law firms. The employment laws of most countries are available online in the NATLEX database, published by the International Labour Organization. In all cases both actual laws and secondary sources are used to ensure accuracy. Conflicting answers are further checked against 2 additional sources, including a local legal treatise on employment regulation. NOTE: This is a ranking derived from several indicators, 1 being the best (ranked first). The higher the number on this graph, the lower their overall ranking. Invert this graph by clicking on 'Amount' at the top. Consult source for details on methodology.
  • Poverty and inequality > Population below national poverty line > Total: Percentage of country's population that falls below its poverty line.
  • Debt > Interest payments > Current LCU: Interest payments (current LCU). Interest payments include interest payments on government debt--including long-term bonds, long-term loans, and other debt instruments--to domestic and foreign residents.
  • Net trade in goods and services > BoP > Current US$: Net trade in goods and services is derived by offsetting imports of goods and services against exports of goods and services. Exports and imports of goods and services comprise all transactions involving a change of ownership of goods and services between residents of one country and the rest of the world. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Income receipts > BoP > Current US$ per capita: Income receipts refer to employee compensation paid to resident workers working abroad and investment income (receipts on direct investment, portfolio investment, other investments, and receipts on reserve assets). Income derived from the use of intangible assets is excluded from income and recorded under business services. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Net income > BoP > Current US$: Net income refers to receipts and payments of employee compensation paid to nonresident workers and investment income (receipts and payments on direct investment, portfolio investment, other investments, and receipts on reserve assets). Income derived from the use of intangible assets is recorded under business services. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Net capital account > BoP > Current US$: Net capital account includes government debt forgiveness, investment grants in cash or in kind by a government entity, and taxes on capital transfers. Also included are migrants' capital transfers and debt forgiveness and investment grants by nongovernmental entities. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Foreign direct investment > Net inflows > BoP > Current US$ per capita: Foreign direct investment are the net inflows of investment to acquire a lasting management interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than that of the investor. It is the sum of equity capital, reinvestment of earnings, other long-term capital, and short-term capital as shown in the balance of payments. This series shows net inflows in the reporting economy. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Tourism > International tourism, number of arrivals per capita: International tourism, number of arrivals. International inbound tourists (overnight visitors) are the number of tourists who travel to a country other than that in which they have their usual residence, but outside their usual environment, for a period not exceeding 12 months and whose main purpose in visiting is other than an activity remunerated from within the country visited. When data on number of tourists are not available, the number of visitors, which includes tourists, same-day visitors, cruise passengers, and crew members, is shown instead. Sources and collection methods for arrivals differ across countries. In some cases data are from border statistics (police, immigration, and the like) and supplemented by border surveys. In other cases data are from tourism accommodation establishments. For some countries number of arrivals is limited to arrivals by air and for others to arrivals staying in hotels. Some countries include arrivals of nationals residing abroad while others do not. Caution should thus be used in comparing arrivals across countries. The data on inbound tourists refer to the number of arrivals, not to the number of people traveling. Thus a person who makes several trips to a country during a given period is counted each time as a new arrival. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Trade > Exports > Exports of goods and services: GDP by Type of Expenditure at current prices - US dollars.
  • Micro > Small and medium enterprises > Number per 1000: Micro, small, and medium-size enterprises are business that may be defined by the number of employees. There is no international standard definition of firm size; however, many institutions that collect information use the following size categories: micro enterprises have 0-9 employees, small enterprises have 10-49 employees, and medium-size enterprises have 50-249 employees. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Budget > Expenditures per capita: Expenditures calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Debt service: Total debt service (% of exports of goods and services). Total debt service is the sum of principal repayments and interest actually paid in foreign currency, goods, or services on long-term debt, interest paid on short-term debt, and repayments (repurchases and charges) to the IMF. Exports of goods and services includes income and workers' remittances.
  • GDP > Composition, by end use > Investment in inventories: This entry is derived from Economy > GDP > Composition, by end use, which shows who does the spending in an economy: consumers, businesses, government, and foreigners. The distribution gives the percentage contribution to total GDP of household consumption, government consumption, investment in fixed capital, investment in inventories, exports of goods and services, and imports of goods and services, and will total 100 percent of GDP if the data are complete.
    household consumption consists of expenditures by resident households, and by nonprofit institutions that serve households, on goods and services that are consumed by individuals. This includes consumption of both domestically produced and foreign goods and services.
    government consumption consists of government expenditures on goods and services. These figures exclude government transfer payments, such as interest on debt, unemployment, and social security, since such payments are not made in exchange for goods and services supplied.
    investment in fixed capital consists of total business spending on fixed assets, such as factories, machinery, equipment, dwellings, and inventories of raw materials, which provide the basis for future production. It is measured gross of the depreciation of the assets, i.e., it includes investment that merely replaces worn-out or scrapped capital. Earlier editions of The World Factbook referred to this concept as Investment (gross fixed) and that data now have been moved to this new field.
    investment in inventories consists of net changes to the stock of outputs that are still held by the units that produce them, awaiting further sale to an end user, such as automobiles sitting on a dealer’s lot or groceries on the store shelves. This figure may be positive or negative. If the stock of unsold output increases during the relevant time period, investment in inventories is positive, but, if the stock of unsold goods declines, it will be negative. Investment in inventories normally is an early indicator of the state of the economy. If the stock of unsold items increases unexpectedly – because people stop buying - the economy may be entering a recession; but if the stock of unsold items falls - and goods "go flying off the shelves" - businesses normally try to replace those stocks, and the economy is likely to accelerate.
    exports of goods and services consist of sales, barter, gifts, or grants of goods and services from residents to nonresidents.
    imports of goods and ...
    Full definition






  • Gross National Income > Constant LCU: Gross national income is derived as the sum of GNP and the terms of trade adjustment. Data are in constant local currency.
  • Innovation > Research and development personnel > By sector > Business enterprise sector (full time employment): Number of full-time employed researchers in private for-profit enterprises.
  • Big Mac Index > Per $ GDP: Price of a McDonald's Big Mac in US Dollars at current exchange rates. January 12th, 2006. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 14.1 billion $ gross domestic product.
  • Terms of trade: Terms of trade (1980 = 100) 1999. The ratio of the export price index to the import price index measured relative to the base year 1980. A value of more than 100 implies that the price of exports has risen relative to the price of imports.
  • Foreign direct investment > Net > BoP > Current US$: Foreign direct investment is net inflows of investment to acquire a lasting management interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than that of the investor. It is the sum of equity capital, reinvestment of earnings, other long-term capital, and short-term capital as shown in the balance of payments. This series shows total net, that is, net FDI in the reporting economy from foreign sources less net FDI by the reporting economy to the rest of the world. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Income > GNI, PPP > Current international $: GNI, PPP (current international $). PPP GNI (formerly PPP GNP) is gross national income (GNI) converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GNI as a U.S. dollar has in the United States. Gross national income is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current international dollars.
  • Trade > Exports > Primary: Primary exports as % of manufactured export, 2000.
  • Current account balance > BoP > Current US$ per capita: Current account balance is the sum of net exports of goods, services, net income, and net current transfers. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Patent applications > Residents: Patent applications are worldwide patent applications filed through the Patent Cooperation Treaty procedure or with a national patent office for exclusive rights for an invention--a product or process that provides a new way of doing something or offers a new technical solution to a problem. A patent provides protection for the invention to the owner of the patent for a limited period, generally 20 years."
  • Poverty and inequality > Population in severe poverty: Multidimensional Poverty Index.
  • Total > Reserves minus gold > Current US$: Total reserves minus gold comprise special drawing rights, reserves of IMF members held by the IMF, and holdings of foreign exchange under the control of monetary authorities. Gold holdings are excluded. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Gross domestic savings > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Gross domestic savings are calculated as GDP less final consumption expenditure (total consumption). Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • Companies > Stock market > Stocks traded, total value > Current US$ per capita: Stocks traded, total value (current US$). Stocks traded refers to the total value of shares traded during the period. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Saving rate: ""Saving rate"" or gross savings are calculated as gross national income less total consumption, plus net transfers."
  • Welfare > Revenue, excluding grants > Current LCU: Revenue, excluding grants (current LCU). Revenue is cash receipts from taxes, social contributions, and other revenues such as fines, fees, rent, and income from property or sales. Grants are also considered as revenue but are excluded here.
  • Debt > External debt stocks: External debt stocks, total (DOD, current US$).
  • Government > Revenue > Tax > Taxes local income of resident citizens: Indicates whether or not a tax is levied on income generated within the country by individuals who are both citizens and residents of this country.
  • Purchasing power parity > GDP per capita > PPP > Current international $: GDP per capita based on purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current international dollars.
  • Spending > General government final consumption expenditure > Constant LCU: General government final consumption expenditure (constant LCU). General government final consumption expenditure (formerly general government consumption) includes all government current expenditures for purchases of goods and services (including compensation of employees). It also includes most expenditures on national defense and security, but excludes government military expenditures that are part of government capital formation. Data are in constant local currency.
  • GNI > Atlas method > Current US$ per capita: GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current U.S. dollars. GNI, calculated in national currency, is usually converted to U.S. dollars at official exchange rates for comparisons across economies, although an alternative rate is used when the official exchange rate is judged to diverge by an exceptionally large margin from the rate actually applied in international transactions. To smooth fluctuations in prices and exchange rates, a special Atlas method of conversion is used by the World Bank. This applies a conversion factor that averages the exchange rate for a given year and the two preceding years, adjusted for differences in rates of inflation between the country, and through 2000, the G-5 countries (France, Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States). From 2001, these countries include the Euro Zone, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Stocks traded > Turnover ratio: Turnover ratio is the total value of shares traded during the period divided by the average market capitalization for the period. Average market capitalization is calculated as the average of the end-of-period values for the current period and the previous period.
  • Poverty and inequality > Richest 10% to poorest 10% ratio: The ratio of average income of the richest 10% of the population to the average income of the poorest 10% of the population.
  • Poverty and inequality > Causes of poverty > Health: Percentage health counts for in the country's total Multidimensional Poverty Index (UN). For instance, health is 40% of Senegal's poverty issues, while the remaining 60% is for living standards and education. Cross country comparisons based off these numbers aren't an accurate telling of how bad health issues are between countries, but rather how much of an issue health concerns are in each country.
  • Retail > Gross value added by wholesale, retail trade, restaurants and hotels per capita: Gross Value Added by Kind of Economic Activity at current prices - US dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Innovation > Research and development personnel > By sector > Higher education sector (Headcounts): Total number of researchers hired by post-secondary institutions such as universities and colleges.
  • Gross capital formation > Current US$: Gross capital formation (formerly gross domestic investment) consists of outlays on additions to the fixed assets of the economy plus net changes in the level of inventories. Fixed assets include land improvements (fences, ditches, drains, and so on); plant, machinery, and equipment purchases; and the construction of roads, railways, and the like, including schools, offices, hospitals, private residential dwellings, and commercial and industrial buildings. Inventories are stocks of goods held by firms to meet temporary or unexpected fluctuations in production or sales, and "work in progress." According to the 1993 SNA, net acquisitions of valuables are also considered capital formation. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Net domestic credit > Current LCU: Net domestic credit is the sum of net credit to the nonfinancial public sector, credit to the private sector, and other accounts. Data are in current local currency.
  • Balance of payments > Current account > Balances > Net trade in goods and services > Current US$: Net trade in goods and services is derived by offsetting imports of goods and services against exports of goods and services. Exports and imports of goods and services comprise all transactions involving a change of ownership of goods and services between residents of one country and the rest of the world. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Tax > Social security contributions: Social contributions include social security contributions by employees, employers, and self-employed individuals, and other contributions whose source cannot be determined. They also include actual or imputed contributions to social insurance schemes operated by governments."
  • Portfolio investment > Equity > DRS > Current US$: Portfolio investment flows are net and include non-debt-creating portfolio equity flows (the sum of country funds, depository receipts, and direct purchases of shares by foreign investors). Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Current account balance > BoP > Current US$: Current account balance is the sum of net exports of goods, services, net income, and net current transfers. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • GNI > PPP > Current international $: PPP GNI (formerly PPP GNP) is gross national income converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GNI as a U.S. dollar has in the United States. Gross national income (GNI) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current international dollars.
  • Innovation > Patent applications, residents per million: Patent applications, residents. Patent applications are worldwide patent applications filed through the Patent Cooperation Treaty procedure or with a national patent office for exclusive rights for an invention--a product or process that provides a new way of doing something or offers a new technical solution to a problem. A patent provides protection for the invention to the owner of the patent for a limited period, generally 20 years. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Poverty > Poverty gap at national poverty line: Poverty gap at national poverty line is the mean shortfall from the poverty line (counting the nonpoor as having zero shortfall) as a percentage of
  • Income > PPP conversion factor, GDP > LCU per international $: PPP conversion factor, GDP (LCU per international $). Purchasing power parity conversion factor is the number of units of a country's currency required to buy the same amounts of goods and services in the domestic market as U.S. dollar would buy in the United States. This conversion factor is for GDP.
  • Income > GDP per capita, PPP > Constant 2005 international $: GDP per capita, PPP (constant 2005 international $). GDP per capita based on purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant 2005 international dollars.
  • Income > GDP, PPP > Current international $ per capita: GDP, PPP (current international $). PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current international dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Income > GDP, PPP > Constant 2005 international $ per capita: GDP, PPP (constant 2005 international $). PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant 2005 international dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Market capitalization of listed companies > Current US$ per capita: Market capitalization (also known as market value) is the share price times the number of shares outstanding. Listed domestic companies are the domestically incorporated companies listed on the country's stock exchanges at the end of the year. Listed companies does not include investment companies, mutual funds, or other collective investment vehicles. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Stocks traded > Total value > Current US$: Stocks traded refers to the total value of shares traded during the period.
  • Government > Revenue > Tax > Taxes local income of nonresident individuals: Indicates whether or not a tax is levied on income generated in the country by individuals who are not residents (applies to both, citizens and foreigners).
  • GDP > Median household income (PPP): Median Household Income $PPP.
  • Intellectual property > Copyright > Copyright duration relative to life of author: This stat compares the copyright duration of an original intellectual creation after its author's death. Although the definition is very variable, an original intellectual work can be described as the previously unpublished work of artistic or divulgative nature. As an almost universal rule, the copyright last for the entire life of the author or authors, plus a given number of years (typically 50 to 70). You can check this page for copyright terms concerning works published for the first time after the author's death, works published in non-printed form (like audiovisual creations) and other special cases. Once the copyright term expires, the work becomes public domain, and therefore can be freely used by anyone.
  • Oil > Exports: This entry is the total oil exported in barrels per day (bbl/day), including both crude oil and oil products.
    Additional details:
    • Bahamas, The: transshipments of 41,570 bbl/day (2007)
    • Bahamas, The: transshipments of 41,610 bbl/day (2009)


  • Debt > Credit depth of information index > 0=low to 6=high: Credit depth of information index (0=low to 6=high). Credit depth of information index measures rules affecting the scope, accessibility, and quality of credit information available through public or private credit registries. The index ranges from 0 to 6, with higher values indicating the availability of more credit information, from either a public registry or a private bureau, to facilitate lending decisions.
  • Debt > Strength of legal rights index > 0=weak to 10=strong: Strength of legal rights index (0=weak to 10=strong). Strength of legal rights index measures the degree to which collateral and bankruptcy laws protect the rights of borrowers and lenders and thus facilitate lending. The index ranges from 0 to 10, with higher scores indicating that these laws are better designed to expand access to credit.
  • Innovation > Military expenditure > Current LCU: Military expenditure (current LCU). Military expenditures data from SIPRI are derived from the NATO definition, which includes all current and capital expenditures on the armed forces, including peacekeeping forces; defense ministries and other government agencies engaged in defense projects; paramilitary forces, if these are judged to be trained and equipped for military operations; and military space activities. Such expenditures include military and civil personnel, including retirement pensions of military personnel and social services for personnel; operation and maintenance; procurement; military research and development; and military aid (in the military expenditures of the donor country). Excluded are civil defense and current expenditures for previous military activities, such as for veterans' benefits, demobilization, conversion, and destruction of weapons. This definition cannot be applied for all countries, however, since that would require much more detailed information than is available about what is included in military budgets and off-budget military expenditure items. (For example, military budgets might or might not cover civil defense, reserves and auxiliary forces, police and paramilitary forces, dual-purpose forces such as military and civilian police, military grants in kind, pensions for military personnel, and social security contributions paid by one part of government to another.)
  • Purchasing power parity > Gross domestic product per capita > PPP: GDP per capita based on purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant 2005 international dollars.
  • Balance of payments > Foreign investment > Net > USD: Foreign direct investment is net inflows of investment to acquire a lasting management interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than that of the investor. It is the sum of equity capital, reinvestment of earnings, other long-term capital, and short-term capital as shown in the balance of payments. This series shows total net, that is, net FDI in the reporting economy from foreign sources less net FDI by the reporting economy to the rest of the world. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • Household spending: Household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption) is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country. Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars."
  • Welfare > Social contributions > Current LCU: Social contributions (current LCU). Social contributions include social security contributions by employees, employers, and self-employed individuals, and other contributions whose source cannot be determined. They also include actual or imputed contributions to social insurance schemes operated by governments.
  • Trade > Export value index: Export values are from UNCTAD's value indexes or from current values of merchandise exports.
    2000 = 100
  • Innovation > Research and development personnel > By sector > Business enterprise sector: Total number of researchers employed by private for-profit enterprises.
  • Transnational corporations > Affiliates: Number of foreign affiliates to transnational corporations
  • Purchasing power parity conversion factor > LCU per international $: Purchasing power parity conversion factor is the number of units of a country's currency required to buy the same amounts of goods and services in the domestic market as U.S. dollar would buy in the United States.
  • GDP per capita > PPP > Constant 2000 international $: GDP per capita based on purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant 2000 international dollars.
  • Companies > New businesses registered > Number: New businesses registered (number). New businesses registered are the number of new limited liability corporations registered in the calendar year.
  • Companies > New business density > New registrations per 1,000 people ages 15-64: New business density (new registrations per 1,000 people ages 15-64). New businesses registered are the number of new limited liability corporations registered in the calendar year.
  • Companies > New businesses registered > Number per 1000: New businesses registered (number). New businesses registered are the number of new limited liability corporations registered in the calendar year. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Inflation > Duration 1990-2000: Average annual change in consumer price index (%) 1990 - 2000
  • Trade > Exports to US: in US dollars. Jan 2003 - March 2003
  • Trade > Exports > Per capita: The total US dollar amount of exports on an f.o.b. (free on board) basis. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Population below poverty line > Per $ GDP: National estimates of the percentage of the population lying below the poverty line are based on surveys of sub-groups, with the results weighted by the number of people in each group. Definitions of poverty vary considerably among nations. For example, rich nations generally employ more generous standards of poverty than poor nations. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 trillion $ gross domestic product.
  • Trade > Imports from US: In US dollars. Jan 2003 - March 2003
  • Trade > Imports > By good > Veneer plywood etc: Imports of Veneer/plywood/etc, by country, in thousands USD
  • Trade > Imports > By good > Pharmaceuticals excl medicaments: Imports of Pharmaceuticals excl. medicaments, by country, in thousands USD
  • Trade > Exports > High technology: High-technology exports as % of manufactured export, 2000.
  • GDP > CIA Factbook > Per capita: Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Purchasing power parity > PPP conversion factor > Private > Consumption > LCU per international $: Purchasing power parity conversion factor is the number of units of a country's currency required to buy the same amounts of goods and services in the domestic market as U.S. dollar would buy in the United States. This conversion factor is for private consumption (i.e., household final consumption expenditure)."
  • Trade > Export to Import ratio: Net barter terms of trade index is calculated as the percentage ratio of the export unit value indexes to the import unit value indexes, measured relative to the base year 2000."
  • Savings > Gross savings > Current US$: Gross savings (current US$). Gross savings are calculated as gross national income less total consumption, plus net transfers. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Inflation > Consumer price index > 2005 = 100 per million: Consumer price index (2005 = 100). Consumer price index reflects changes in the cost to the average consumer of acquiring a basket of goods and services that may be fixed or changed at specified intervals, such as yearly. The Laspeyres formula is generally used. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Innovation > Patent applications, residents: Patent applications, residents. Patent applications are worldwide patent applications filed through the Patent Cooperation Treaty procedure or with a national patent office for exclusive rights for an invention--a product or process that provides a new way of doing something or offers a new technical solution to a problem. A patent provides protection for the invention to the owner of the patent for a limited period, generally 20 years.
  • Financial sector > Interest rates > Lending interest rate: Lending interest rate is the rate charged by banks on loans to prime customers.
  • Gross savings: Gross savings are calculated as gross national income less total consumption, plus net transfers. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • Electricity > Consumption: This entry consists of total electricity generated annually plus imports and minus exports, expressed in kilowatt-hours. The discrepancy between the amount of electricity generated and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is accounted for as loss in transmission and distribution.
  • Trade > Exports > Manufactured: Manufactured exports as % of manufactured export, 2000.
  • International tourism > Receipts > Current US$ per capita: International tourism receipts are expenditures by international inbound visitors, including payments to national carriers for international transport. These receipts should include any other prepayment made for goods or services received in the destination country. They also may include receipts from same-day visitors, except in cases where these are so important as to justify a separate classification. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • International tourism > Expenditures > Current US$: International tourism expenditures are expenditures of international outbound visitors in other countries, including payments to foreign carriers for international transport. These may include expenditures by residents traveling abroad as same-day visitors, except in cases where these are so important as to justify a separate classification. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Market capitalization of listed companies > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Market capitalization (also known as market value) is the share price times the number of shares outstanding. Listed domestic companies are the domestically incorporated companies listed on the country's stock exchanges at the end of the year. Listed companies does not include investment companies, mutual funds, or other collective investment vehicles. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1,000 $ gross domestic product.
  • Gross fixed capital formation > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Gross fixed capital formation (formerly gross domestic fixed investment) includes land improvements (fences, ditches, drains, and so on); plant, machinery, and equipment purchases; and the construction of roads, railways, and the like, including schools, offices, hospitals, private residential dwellings, and commercial and industrial buildings. According to the 1993 SNA, net acquisitions of valuables are also considered capital formation. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 $ gross domestic product.
  • GNI > Current US$: GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Tourism > International tourism, receipts > Current US$: International tourism, receipts (current US$). International tourism receipts are expenditures by international inbound visitors, including payments to national carriers for international transport. These receipts include any other prepayment made for goods or services received in the destination country. They also may include receipts from same-day visitors, except when these are important enough to justify separate classification. For some countries they do not include receipts for passenger transport items. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Public institution index: Public institution index indicates the state of the country's public institutions.
  • Oil > Consumption: This entry is the total oil consumed in barrels per day (bbl/day). The discrepancy between the amount of oil produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes, refinery gains, and other complicating factors.
  • Innovation > Research and development personnel > By sector > Government sector (full time employment): Number of full-time employed researchers in the government sector.
  • Government > Revenue > Tax > Maximum tax rate for individuals: Individual (max).

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    Mexico had range specified: 29%-3%

  • Trade > Imports of goods > Services and income > BoP > Current US$: Imports of goods, services and income is the sum of goods (merchandise) imports, imports of (nonfactor) services and income (factor) payments. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Budget > Expenditures > Per capita: Expenditures calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Government > Revenue > Tax > Taxes foreign income of nonresident citizens: Indicates whether or not a tax is levied on the foreign income of non-resident citizens. An asterisk indicates that certain exemptions exist.
  • Government > Revenue > Tax > Taxes local income of resident foreigners: Indicates whether or not a tax is levied on income generated within the country by resident foreigners
  • GDP > Purchasing power parity > Per capita: This entry gives the gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. A nation's GDP at purchasing power parity (PPP) exchange rates is the sum value of all goods and services produced in the country valued at prices prevailing in the United States. This is the measure most economists prefer when looking at per-capita welfare and when comparing living conditions or use of resources across countries. The measure is difficult to compute, as a US dollar value has to be assigned to all goods and services in the country regardless of whether these goods and services have a direct equivalent in the United States (for example, the value of an ox-cart or non-US military equipment); as a result, PPP estimates for some countries are based on a small and sometimes different set of goods and services. In addition, many countries do not formally participate in the World Bank's PPP project that calculates these measures, so the resulting GDP estimates for these countries may lack precision. For many developing countries, PPP-based GDP measures are multiples of the official exchange rate (OER) measure. The difference between the OER- and PPP-denominated GDP values for most of the weathly industrialized countries are generally much smaller. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Tax > Taxes on goods and services > Current LCU: Taxes on goods and services include general sales and turnover or value added taxes, selective excises on goods, selective taxes on services, taxes on the use of goods or property, taxes on extraction and production of minerals, and profits of fiscal monopolies."
  • Currency > PPP conversion factor > GDP to market exchange rate ratio: PPP conversion factor (GDP) to market exchange rate ratio. Purchasing power parity conversion factor is the number of units of a country's currency required to buy the same amount of goods and services in the domestic market as a U.S. dollar would buy in the United States. The ratio of PPP conversion factor to market exchange rate is the result obtained by dividing the PPP conversion factor by the market exchange rate. The ratio, also referred to as the national price level, makes it possible to compare the cost of the bundle of goods that make up gross domestic product (GDP) across countries. It tells how many dollars are needed to buy a dollar's worth of goods in the country as compared to the United States.
  • Business > Companies > Specific companies > Carrefour > Supermarkets: Amount of shops of the type “Supermarket” Carrefour has per country. Carrefour’s brands Carrefour Bairro, Carrefour Express, Carrefour Market, Champion Mapinomovaoe, Globi, Carrefour GB, GS, Carrefour Mini and Gima make up the category Supermarket.
  • Government > Revenue > Tax > Corporate tax: Corporate tax.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

    Bangladesh had range specified: 45%-0%

    Maldives had range specified: 15%-0%

    Mexico had range specified: 30%-28%

    Spain had range specified: 30%-25%

    Sri Lanka had range specified: 35%-0%

    Switzerland had range specified: 25%-13%

  • Business > Companies > Specific companies > Carrefour > Hypermarkets: Amount of shops of the type “Hypermarket” Carrefour has per country. Carrefour’s brands Carrefour, Atacadão and Hyperstar make up the category Hypermarket.
  • Micro > Small and medium enterprises > Per 1,000 people: Micro, small, and medium-size enterprises are business that may be defined by the number of employees. There is no international standard definition of firm size; however, many institutions that collect information use the following size categories: micro enterprises have 0-9 employees, small enterprises have 10-49 employees, and medium-size enterprises have 50-249 employees.
  • Poverty and inequality > Population in multidimensional poverty > Proportion: Multidimensional Poverty Index.
  • Poverty and inequality > Multidimensional poverty index: Multidimensional Poverty Index.
  • Oil > Production: This entry is the total oil produced in barrels per day (bbl/day). The discrepancy between the amount of oil produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes, refinery gains, and other complicating factors.
  • Natural gas > Production: This entry is the total natural gas produced in cubic meters (cu m). The discrepancy between the amount of natural gas produced and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is due to the omission of stock changes and other complicating factors.
  • Companies > Market capitalization of listed companies > Current US$ per capita: Market capitalization of listed companies (current US$). Market capitalization (also known as market value) is the share price times the number of shares outstanding. Listed domestic companies are the domestically incorporated companies listed on the country's stock exchanges at the end of the year. Listed companies does not include investment companies, mutual funds, or other collective investment vehicles. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Balance of payments > Current account > Goods > Services and income > Exports > Goods and services > Current U: Exports of goods and services comprise all transactions between residents of a country and the rest of the world involving a change of ownership from residents to nonresidents of general merchandise, goods sent for processing and repairs, nonmonetary gold, and services. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • Budget > Expenditures > Per $ GDP: Expenditures calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in purchasing power parity (PPP) terms Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 $ gross domestic product.
  • Government spending > Goods and services expense > Current LCU: Goods and services expense (current LCU). Goods and services include all government payments in exchange for goods and services used for the production of market and nonmarket goods and services. Own-account capital formation is excluded.
  • Welfare > Revenue, excluding grants > Current LCU per capita: Revenue, excluding grants (current LCU). Revenue is cash receipts from taxes, social contributions, and other revenues such as fines, fees, rent, and income from property or sales. Grants are also considered as revenue but are excluded here. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Debt > Central government debt, total > Current LCU per capita: Central government debt, total (current LCU). Debt is the entire stock of direct government fixed-term contractual obligations to others outstanding on a particular date. It includes domestic and foreign liabilities such as currency and money deposits, securities other than shares, and loans. It is the gross amount of government liabilities reduced by the amount of equity and financial derivatives held by the government. Because debt is a stock rather than a flow, it is measured as of a given date, usually the last day of the fiscal year. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Poverty and inequality > Poorest's share in national income or consumption: Percentage of country's total income or consumption that belongs to the poorest 5% of its citizens.
  • Trade > Exports > By good > Perfume toilet cosmetics: Exports of Perfume/toilet/cosmetics, by country, in thousands USD
  • Trade > Imports > Goods and services > Current US$ > Per $ GDP: Imports of goods and services represent the value of all goods and other market services received from the rest of the world. They include the value of merchandise, freight, insurance, transport, travel, royalties, license fees, and other services, such as communication, construction, financial, information, business, personal, and government services. They exclude labor and property income (formerly called factor services) as well as transfer payments. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per $ GDP figures expressed per 1 $ gross domestic product.
  • Balance of payments > Current account > Transfers > Workers' remittances and compensation of employees > Receiv: Workers' remittances and compensation of employees comprise current transfers by migrant workers and wages and salaries earned by nonresident workers. Data are the sum of three items defined in the fifth edition of the IMF's Balance of Payments Manual: workers' remittances, compensation of employees, and migrants' transfers. Remittances are classified as current private transfers from migrant workers resident in the host country for more than a year, irrespective of their immigration status, to recipients in their country of origin. Migrants' transfers are defined as the net worth of migrants who are expected to remain in the host country for more than one year that is transferred from one country to another at the time of migration. Compensation of employees is the income of migrants who have lived in the host country for less than a year. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • Electricity > Exports: This entry is the total exported electricity in kilowatt-hours.
  • Trade > Imports > Goods and services > BoP > Current US$: Imports of goods and services comprise all transactions between residents of a country and the rest of the world involving a change of ownership from nonresidents to residents of general merchandise, goods sent for processing and repairs, nonmonetary gold, and services. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Innovation > Research and development personnel > By sector > Business enterprise sector (Headcounts): Total number of researchers employed by private for-profit enterprises.
  • Innovation > Research and development personnel > By sector > Higher education sector: Total number of researchers employed by post-secondary institutions such as universities and colleges.
  • Innovation > Research and development personnel > Technicians: Total number of male and female technicians, defined as people who possess technical knowledge and are experienced in their fields of work. Technicians are below researchers, and often work under their supervision.
  • GDP > CIA Factbook per capita: . Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • GDP growth > Duration 1975-2000: GDP per capita annual growth rate (%) from 1975 to 2000
  • International tourism > Expenditures for travel items > Current US$: International tourism expenditures are expenditures of international outbound visitors in other countries. The goods and services are purchased by, or on behalf of, the traveler or provided, without a quid pro quo, for the traveler to use or give away. These may include expenditures by residents traveling abroad as same-day visitors, except in cases where these are so important as to justify a separate classification. Excluded is the international carriage of travelers, which is covered in passenger travel items. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • Private investment > In energy: Investment in energy projects with private participation covers infrastructure projects in energy (electricity and natural gas transmission and distribution) that have reached financial closure and directly or indirectly serve the public. Movable assets and small projects such as windmills are excluded. The types of projects included are operations and management contracts, operations and management contracts with major capital expenditure, greenfield projects (in which a private entity or a public-private joint venture builds and operates a new facility), and divestitures. Investment commitments are the sum of investments in facilities and investments in government assets. Investments in facilities are the resources the project company commits to invest during the contract period either in new facilities or in expansion and modernisation of existing facilities. Investments in government assets are the resources the project company spends on acquiring government assets such as state-owned enterprises, rights to provide services in a specific area, or the use of specific radio spectrums. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • Foreign aid > Total: Net bilateral aid flows from DAC donors are the net disbursements of official development assistance (ODA) or official aid from the members of the Development Assistance Committee (DAC). Net disbursements are gross disbursements of grants and loans minus repayments of principal on earlier loans. ODA consists of loans made on concessional terms (with a grant element of at least 25 percent, calculated at a rate of discount of 10 percent) and grants made to promote economic development and welfare in countries and territories in the DAC list of ODA recipients. Official aid refers to aid flows from official donors to countries and territories in part II of the DAC list of recipients: more advanced countries of Central and Eastern Europe, the countries of the former Soviet Union, and certain advanced developing countries and territories. Official aid is provided under terms and conditions similar to those for ODA. Part II of the DAC List was abolished in 2005. The collection of data on official aid and other resource flows to Part II countries ended with 2004 data. DAC members are Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Republic of Korea, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States, and Commission of the European Communities. Regional aggregates include data for economies not specified elsewhere. World and income group totals include aid not allocated by country or region. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • Financial sector > Interest rates > Interest rate spread > Lending rate minus deposit rate: Interest rate spread is the interest rate charged by banks on loans to prime customers minus the interest rate paid by commercial or similar banks for demand, time, or savings deposits."
  • Companies > Time required to obtain an operating license > Days: Time required to obtain an operating license (days). Time required to obtain operating license is the average wait to obtain an operating license from the day the establishment applied for it to the day it was granted.
  • GDP > Constant 2000 US$ > Per capita: GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in constant 2000 U.S. dollars. Dollar figures for GDP are converted from domestic currencies using 2000 official exchange rates. For a few countries where the official exchange rate does not reflect the rate effectively applied to actual foreign exchange transactions, an alternative conversion factor is used. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Gross domestic savings > Current US$: Gross domestic savings are calculated as GDP less final consumption expenditure (total consumption). Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Savings > Adjusted savings: net national savings > Current US$: Adjusted savings: net national savings (current US$). Net national savings are equal to gross national savings less the value of consumption of fixed capital.
  • Oil > Proved reserves: This entry is the stock of proved reserves of crude oil in barrels (bbl). Proved reserves are those quantities of petroleum which, by analysis of geological and engineering data, can be estimated with a high degree of confidence to be commercially recoverable from a given date forward, from known reservoirs and under current economic conditions.
  • Foreign direct investment > Net > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita: Foreign direct investment is net inflows of investment to acquire a lasting management interest (10 percent or more of voting stock) in an enterprise operating in an economy other than that of the investor. It is the sum of equity capital, reinvestment of earnings, other long-term capital, and short-term capital as shown in the balance of payments. This series shows total net, that is, net FDI in the reporting economy from foreign sources less net FDI by the reporting economy to the rest of the world. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Government > Revenue > Tax > Taxes foreign income of resident foreigners: Indicates whether or not a tax is levied on the foreign income of resident foreigners.
  • Poverty and inequality > Population vulnerable to poverty > Proportion: Multidimensional Poverty Index.
  • Tax > Revenue > Excluding grants > Current LCU: Revenue is cash receipts from taxes, social contributions, and other revenues such as fines, fees, rent, and income from property or sales. Grants are also considered as revenue but are excluded here."
  • World Bank exchange rate: The DEC alternative conversion factor is the underlying annual exchange rate used for the World Bank Atlas method. As a rule, it is the official exchange rate reported in the IMF's International Financial Statistics (line rf). Exceptions arise where further refinements are made by World Bank staff. It is expressed in local currency units per U.S. dollar."
  • Balance of payments > Current account > Transfers > Net current transfers > BoP > Current US$: Net current transfers are recorded in the balance of payments whenever an economy provides or receives goods, services, income, or financial items without a quid pro quo. All transfers not considered to be capital are current. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • Balance of payments > Financial > Reserves: Changes in net reserves is the net change in a country's holdings of international reserves resulting from transactions on the current, capital, and financial accounts. These include changes in holdings of monetary gold, SDRs, foreign exchange assets, reserve position in the International Monetary Fund, and other claims on nonresidents that are available to the central authority. The measure is net of liabilities constituting foreign authorities' reserves, and counterpart items for valuation changes and exceptional financing items. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • Trade > Imports > By good > Tractors: Imports of Tractors, by country, in thousands USD
  • Electricity > Production per capita: This entry is the annual electricity generated expressed in kilowatt-hours. The discrepancy between the amount of electricity generated and/or imported and the amount consumed and/or exported is accounted for as loss in transmission and distribution. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • International tourism > Receipts for travel items > Current US$: International tourism receipts for travel items are expenditures by international inbound visitors in the reporting economy. The goods and services are purchased by, or on behalf of, the traveler or provided, without a quid pro quo, for the traveler to use or give away. These receipts should include any other prepayment made for goods or services received in the destination country. They also may include receipts from same-day visitors, except in cases where these are so important as to justify a separate classification. Excluded is the international carriage of travelers, which is covered in passenger travel items. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • Inbound tourism income > Current US$: International tourism receipts are expenditures by international inbound visitors, including payments to national carriers for international transport. These receipts include any other prepayment made for goods or services received in the destination country. They also may include receipts from same-day visitors, except when these are important enough to justify separate classification. For some countries they do not include receipts for passenger transport items. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • External debt > Debt outstanding > External debt stocks > Total > DOD > Current US$: Total external debt is debt owed to nonresidents repayable in foreign currency, goods, or services. Total external debt is the sum of public, publicly guaranteed, and private nonguaranteed long-term debt, use of IMF credit, and short-term debt. Short-term debt includes all debt having an original maturity of one year or less and interest in arrears on long-term debt. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • Market capitalization of listed companies > Current US$: Market capitalization (also known as market value) is the share price times the number of shares outstanding. Listed domestic companies are the domestically incorporated companies listed on the country's stock exchanges at the end of the year. Listed companies does not include investment companies, mutual funds, or other collective investment vehicles. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Ease of doing business: Ease of doing business index ranks economies from 1 to 183, with first place being the best. A high ranking means that the regulatory environment is conducive to business operation. The index ranks the simple average of the country's percentile rankings on 10 topics covered in the World Bank's Doing Business. The ranking on each topic is the simple average of the percentile rankings on its component indicators. 1=most business-friendly regulations"
  • Total > Reserves minus gold > Current US$ per capita: Total reserves minus gold comprise special drawing rights, reserves of IMF members held by the IMF, and holdings of foreign exchange under the control of monetary authorities. Gold holdings are excluded. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • GNI > Current US$ > Per capita: GNI (formerly GNP) is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Official development assistance and official aid > Current US$ per capita: Net official development assistance consists of disbursements of loans made on concessional terms (net of repayments of principal) and grants by official agencies of the members of the Development Assistance Committee (DAC), by multilateral institutions, and by non-DAC countries to promote economic development and welfare in countries and territories in part I of the DAC list of recipients. It includes loans with a grant element of at least 25 percent (calculated at a rate of discount of 10 percent). Net official aid refers to aid flows (net of repayments) from official donors to countries and territories in part II of the DAC list of recipients: more advanced countries of Central and Eastern Europe, the countries of the former Soviet Union, and certain advanced developing countries and territories. Official aid is provided under terms and conditions similar to those for ODA. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Purchasing power parity > GDP > PPP > Current international $: PPP GDP is gross domestic product converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GDP as the U.S. dollar has in the United States. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current international dollars.
  • Purchasing power parity > GNI per capita > PPP > Current international $: GNI per capita based on purchasing power parity (PPP). PPP GNI is gross national income (GNI) converted to international dollars using purchasing power parity rates. An international dollar has the same purchasing power over GNI as a U.S. dollar has in the United States. GNI is the sum of value added by all resident producers plus any product taxes (less subsidies) not included in the valuation of output plus net receipts of primary income (compensation of employees and property income) from abroad. Data are in current international dollars.
  • Purchasing power parity > PPP conversion factor > GDP to market exchange rate ratio: Purchasing power parity conversion factor is the number of units of a country's currency required to buy the same amount of goods and services in the domestic market as a U.S. dollar would buy in the United States. The ratio of PPP conversion factor to market exchange rate is the result obtained by dividing the PPP conversion factor by the market exchange rate. The ratio, also referred to as the national price level, makes it possible to compare the cost of the bundle of goods that make up gross domestic product (GDP) across countries. It tells how many dollars are needed to buy a dollar's worth of goods in the country as compared to the United States."
  • High-technology > Exports > Current US$: High-technology exports are products with high research and development intensity, such as in aerospace, computers, pharmaceuticals, scientific instruments, and electrical machinery. Data are in current U.S. dollars."
  • Trade > Exports > By good > Passenger cars etc per 1000: Exports of Passenger cars etc, by country, in thousands USD. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Spending > Household final consumption expenditure, etc. > Current US$ per capita: Household final consumption expenditure, etc. (current US$). Household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption) is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country. This item also includes any statistical discrepancy in the use of resources relative to the supply of resources. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Savings > Gross savings > Current US$ per capita: Gross savings (current US$). Gross savings are calculated as gross national income less total consumption, plus net transfers. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Reserves > Total reserves minus gold > Current US$: Total reserves minus gold (current US$). Total reserves minus gold comprise special drawing rights, reserves of IMF members held by the IMF, and holdings of foreign exchange under the control of monetary authorities. Gold holdings are excluded. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Spending > Household final consumption expenditure per capita > Constant 2000 US$: Household final consumption expenditure per capita (constant 2000 US$). Household final consumption expenditure per capita (private consumption per capita) is calculated using private consumption in constant 2005 prices and World Bank population estimates. Household final consumption expenditure is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country. Data are in constant 2005 U.S. dollars.
  • Debt > Net domestic credit > Current LCU per capita: Net domestic credit (current LCU). Net domestic credit is the sum of net claims on the central government and claims on other sectors of the domestic economy (IFS line 32). Data are in current local currency. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Spending > Household final consumption expenditure > Constant 2000 US$ per capita: Household final consumption expenditure (constant 2000 US$). Household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption) is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country. Data are in constant 2005 U.S. dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Spending > Household final consumption expenditure > Current LCU per capita: Household final consumption expenditure (current LCU). Household final consumption expenditure (formerly private consumption) is the market value of all goods and services, including durable products (such as cars, washing machines, and home computers), purchased by households. It excludes purchases of dwellings but includes imputed rent for owner-occupied dwellings. It also includes payments and fees to governments to obtain permits and licenses. Here, household consumption expenditure includes the expenditures of nonprofit institutions serving households, even when reported separately by the country. Data are in current local currency. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Tax > GDP > Current US$ per capita: GDP (current US$). GDP at purchaser's prices is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current U.S. dollars. Dollar figures for GDP are converted from domestic currencies using single year official exchange rates. For a few countries where the official exchange rate does not reflect the rate effectively applied to actual foreign exchange transactions, an alternative conversion factor is used. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Savings > Gross domestic savings > Current US$: Gross domestic savings (current US$). Gross domestic savings are calculated as GDP less final consumption expenditure (total consumption). Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Portfolio investment > Bonds > PPG + PNG > NFL > Current US$: Portfolio bond investment consists of bond issues purchased by foreign investors. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Trade > Exports > Leading export market: Country or customs union which is the main recipient of exports.
  • Bank capital to assets ratio: Bank capital to assets is the ratio of bank capital and reserves to total assets. Capital and reserves include funds contributed by owners, retained earnings, general and special reserves, provisions, and valuation adjustments. Capital includes tier 1 capital (paid-up shares and common stock), which is a common feature in all countries' banking systems, and total regulatory capital, which includes several specified types of subordinated debt instruments that need not be repaid if the funds are required to maintain minimum capital levels (these comprise tier 2 and tier 3 capital). Total assets include all nonfinancial and financial assets.
  • Tourism > International tourism, expenditures for travel items > Current US$: International tourism, expenditures for travel items (current US$). International tourism expenditures are expenditures of international outbound visitors in other countries. The goods and services are purchased by, or on behalf of, the traveler or provided, without a quid pro quo, for the traveler to use or give away. These may include expenditures by residents traveling abroad as same-day visitors, except in cases where these are so important as to justify a separate classification. Excluded is the international carriage of travelers, which is covered in passenger travel items. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Tourism > International tourism, number of departures per 1000: International tourism, number of departures. International outbound tourists are the number of departures that people make from their country of usual residence to any other country for any purpose other than a remunerated activity in the country visited. The data on outbound tourists refer to the number of departures, not to the number of people traveling. Thus a person who makes several trips from a country during a given period is counted each time as a new departure. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • GDP > By type of expenditure > Household consumption expenditure per capita: GDP by Type of Expenditure at current prices - US dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Trade > Imports > Imports of goods and services: GDP by Type of Expenditure at current prices - US dollars.
  • Debt > Profit remittances on FDI > Current US$ per capita: Profit remittances on FDI (current US$). Primary income on foreign direct investment covers payments of direct investment income (debit side), which consist of income on equity (dividends, branch profits, and reinvested earnings) and income on the intercompany debt (interest). Data are in current U.S. dollars. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Innovation > Research and development personnel > By sector > Higher education sector (full time employment): Number of full-time employed researchers hired by post-secondary institutions such as universities and colleges.
STAT Brazil Morocco HISTORY
Overview Characterized by large and well-developed agricultural, mining, manufacturing, and service sectors, Brazil's economy outweighs that of all other South American countries, and Brazil is expanding its presence in world markets. Since 2003, Brazil has steadily improved its macroeconomic stability, building up foreign reserves, and reducing its debt profile by shifting its debt burden toward real denominated and domestically held instruments. In 2008, Brazil became a net external creditor and two ratings agencies awarded investment grade status to its debt. After strong growth in 2007 and 2008, the onset of the global financial crisis hit Brazil in 2008. Brazil experienced two quarters of recession, as global demand for Brazil's commodity-based exports dwindled and external credit dried up. However, Brazil was one of the first emerging markets to begin a recovery. In 2010, consumer and investor confidence revived and GDP growth reached 7.5%, the highest growth rate in the past 25 years. Rising inflation led the authorities to take measures to cool the economy; these actions and the deteriorating international economic situation slowed growth to 2.7% in 2011, and 1.3% in 2012. Unemployment is at historic lows and Brazil's traditionally high level of income inequality has declined for each of the last 14 years. Brazil's historically high interest rates have made it an attractive destination for foreign investors. Large capital inflows over the past several years have contributed to the appreciation of the currency, hurting the competitiveness of Brazilian manufacturing and leading the government to intervene in foreign exchange markets and raise taxes on some foreign capital inflows. President Dilma ROUSSEFF has retained the previous administration's commitment to inflation targeting by the central bank, a floating exchange rate, and fiscal restraint. In an effort to boost growth, in 2012 the administration implemented a somewhat more expansionary monetary policy that has failed to stimulate much growth. Morocco has capitalized on its proximity to Europe and relatively low labor costs to build a diverse, open, market-oriented economy. In the 1980s Morocco was a heavily indebted country before pursuing austerity measures and pro-market reforms, overseen by the IMF. Since taking the throne in 1999, King MOHAMMED VI has presided over a stable economy marked by steady growth, low inflation, and gradually falling unemployment, although a poor harvest and economic difficulties in Europe contributed to an economic slowdown in 2012. Industrial development strategies and infrastructure improvements - most visibly illustrated by a new port and free trade zone near Tangier - are improving Morocco's competitiveness. Morocco also seeks to expand its renewable energy capacity with a goal of making renewable 40% of electricity output by 2020. Key sectors of the economy include agriculture, tourism, phosphates, textiles, apparel, and subcomponents. To boost exports, Morocco entered into a bilateral Free Trade Agreement with the United States in 2006 and an Advanced Status agreement with the European Union in 2008. Despite Morocco's economic progress, the country suffers from high unemployment, poverty, and illiteracy, particularly in rural areas. In 2011 and 2012, high prices on fuel - which is subsidized and almost entirely imported - strained the government''s budget and widened the country''s current account deficit. Key economic challenges for Morocco include fighting corruption and reforming the education system, the judiciary, and the government''s costly subsidy program.
Exports $242.60 billion
Ranked 23th. 14 times more than Morocco
$16.99 billion
Ranked 74th.

Fiscal year calendar year calendar year
GDP $2.25 trillion
Ranked 8th. 23 times more than Morocco
$95.98 billion
Ranked 58th.

GDP > Composition by sector > Industry 27.4%
Ranked 99th.
32.8%
Ranked 65th. 20% more than Brazil

GDP > Per capita $11,503.01 per capita
Ranked 32nd. 3 times more than Morocco
$3,702.92 per capita
Ranked 121st.

GDP > Per capita > PPP $11,700.00
Ranked 80th. 2 times more than Morocco
$5,200.00
Ranked 121st.

GDP > Purchasing power parity $2.33 trillion
Ranked 7th. 14 times more than Morocco
$168.90 billion
Ranked 58th.

GDP > Real growth rate 0.9%
Ranked 144th.
2.7%
Ranked 109th. 3 times more than Brazil

GDP per capita $11,339.52
Ranked 56th. 4 times more than Morocco
$2,951.36
Ranked 118th.

Gross National Income $529.00 billion
Ranked 11th. 15 times more than Morocco
$34.68 billion
Ranked 50th.
Population below poverty line 21.4%
Ranked 6th. 43% more than Morocco
15%
Ranked 16th.

Public debt 58.8% of GDP
Ranked 46th.
71.2% of GDP
Ranked 35th. 21% more than Brazil

Tourist arrivals 5.05 million
Ranked 38th.
7.88 million
Ranked 28th. 56% more than Brazil

Unemployment rate 5.5%
Ranked 82nd.
9%
Ranked 45th. 64% more than Brazil

Debt > External $438.90 billion
Ranked 25th. 14 times more than Morocco
$32.15 billion
Ranked 68th.

Inflation rate > Consumer prices 5.4%
Ranked 70th. 5 times more than Morocco
1.2%
Ranked 184th.

Human Development Index 0.792
Ranked 62nd. 26% more than Morocco
0.631
Ranked 124th.
Budget > Revenues $875.50 billion
Ranked 8th. 35 times more than Morocco
$25.35 billion
Ranked 64th.

GDP > Composition by sector > Agriculture 5.4%
Ranked 124th.
14.7%
Ranked 69th. 3 times more than Brazil

Industries textiles, shoes, chemicals, cement, lumber, iron ore, tin, steel, aircraft, motor vehicles and parts, other machinery and equipment phosphate rock mining and processing, food processing, leather goods, textiles, construction, energy, tourism
GDP > Composition by sector > Services 67.2%
Ranked 59th. 28% more than Morocco
52.6%
Ranked 121st.

Budget surplus > + or deficit > - 2.4% of GDP
Ranked 16th.
-8.4% of GDP
Ranked 164th.

Exports > Commodities transport equipment, iron ore, soybeans, footwear, coffee, autos clothing and textiles, electric components, inorganic chemicals, transistors, crude minerals, fertilizers (including phosphates), petroleum products, citrus fruits, vegetables, fish
Distribution of family income > Gini index 51.9
Ranked 1st. 27% more than Morocco
40.9
Ranked 14th.

Economic freedom 57.7
Ranked 100th.
59.6
Ranked 90th. 3% more than Brazil

Central bank discount rate 7.25%
Ranked 11th. 12% more than Morocco
6.5%
Ranked 43th.

Debt > External > Per capita $1,207.30 per capita
Ranked 70th. 2 times more than Morocco
$589.80 per capita
Ranked 84th.

GDP > Composition, by sector of origin > Services 68.5%
Ranked 58th. 29% more than Morocco
53.2%
Ranked 122nd.
World trade > Exports 177.33 billion
Ranked 23th. 7 times more than Morocco
26.12 billion
Ranked 53th.

Imports > Commodities machinery, electrical and transport equipment, chemical products, oil, automotive parts, electronics crude petroleum, textile fabric, telecommunications equipment, wheat, gas and electricity, transistors, plastics
Gross National Income per capita $2,989.24
Ranked 60th. 3 times more than Morocco
$1,195.04
Ranked 93th.
Inequality > GINI index 55.02
Ranked 2nd. 35% more than Morocco
40.88
Ranked 14th.

Exchange rates reals (BRL) per US dollar -<br />1.95 (2012 est.)<br />1.68 (2011 est.)<br />1.76 (2010 est.)<br />2 (2009)<br />1.86 (2008) Moroccan dirhams (MAD) per US dollar -<br />8.6 (2012 est.)<br />8.07 (2011 est.)<br />8.42 (2010 est.)<br />8.06 (2009)<br />7.53 (2008)
Budget > Expenditures $822.10 billion
Ranked 8th. 25 times more than Morocco
$33.32 billion
Ranked 65th.

GINI index 56.99
Ranked 1st. 44% more than Morocco
39.5
Ranked 10th.

Imports $223.20 billion
Ranked 22nd. 6 times more than Morocco
$38.88 billion
Ranked 59th.

Tourist arrivals > Per capita 25.72 per 1,000 people
Ranked 127th.
229.42 per 1,000 people
Ranked 83th. 9 times more than Brazil

Big Mac Index $2.74
Ranked 17th. About the same as Morocco
$2.73
Ranked 18th.
GDP > Purchasing power parity per capita $11,239.17
Ranked 74th. 2 times more than Morocco
$4,860.57
Ranked 117th.

Agriculture > Products coffee, soybeans, wheat, rice, corn, sugarcane, cocoa, citrus; beef barley, wheat, citrus fruits, grapes, vegetables, olives; livestock; wine
Debt > Government debt > Public debt, share of GDP 54.9 CIA
Ranked 52nd.
71.7 CIA
Ranked 37th. 31% more than Brazil
Labor force 105
Ranked 48th. 10 times more than Morocco
11
Ranked 123th.

Currency > PPP conversion factor to official exchange rate ratio 0.51
Ranked 62nd. 34% more than Morocco
0.38
Ranked 94th.

GDP > Per capita > PPP per thousand people $0.06
Ranked 164th.
$0.16
Ranked 142nd. 3 times more than Brazil

Exports > Main exports Manufactured goods, iron ore, coffee, oranges, other agricultural produce Minerals, seafood products, citrus fruit
Currency > Official exchange rate > LCU per US$, period average $1.95
Ranked 133th.
$8.63
Ranked 87th. 4 times more than Brazil

Trade > Exports per capita $1,023.00
Ranked 87th. 2 times more than Morocco
$457.93
Ranked 108th.

Population below poverty line > Per capita 0.132% per 1 million people
Ranked 17th.
0.444% per 1 million people
Ranked 19th. 3 times more than Brazil

Micro > Small and medium enterprises > Number 4.9 million
Ranked 2nd. 11 times more than Morocco
450,000
Ranked 7th.
Exports per capita $1,221.21
Ranked 99th. 2 times more than Morocco
$522.43
Ranked 129th.

Exports > Partners China 17%, US 11.1%, Argentina 7.4%, Netherlands 6.2% France 21%, Spain 17.3%, Brazil 5.4%, India 4.9%, US 4.6%
Consumer price index 151.42%
Ranked 30th. 41% more than Morocco
107.25%
Ranked 142nd.

Current account balance $-54,230,000,000.00
Ranked 174th. 6 times more than Morocco
$-9,843,000,000.00
Ranked 164th.

GNI per capita $10,720.00
Ranked 13th. 4 times more than Morocco
$2,970.00
Ranked 42nd.
Technology index 4.24
Ranked 41st. 28% more than Morocco
3.3
Ranked 73th.
Tax > Average time to clear customs > Days 7.85 days
Ranked 1st. 4 times more than Morocco
1.97 days
Ranked 7th.
Consumer spending 62.76
Ranked 73th. 10% more than Morocco
56.97
Ranked 92nd.

GDP per capita > PPP > Current international $ 8,402.42 PPP $
Ranked 59th. 84% more than Morocco
4,554.98 PPP $
Ranked 94th.

International tourism > Receipts > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 5.24$ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 101st.
105.11$ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 17th. 20 times more than Brazil

GDP per capita > Constant 2000 US$ 3,596.74 constant 2000 US$
Ranked 60th. 3 times more than Morocco
1,356.07 constant 2000 US$
Ranked 96th.

Commercial bank prime lending rate 36.64%
Ranked 2nd. 6 times more than Morocco
6.3%
Ranked 132nd.

GDP > Official exchange rate $2.22 trillion
Ranked 7th. 23 times more than Morocco
$94.83 billion
Ranked 62nd.

Industrial > Production growth rate 11.5%
Ranked 15th. 3 times more than Morocco
4.4%
Ranked 73th.

Labor force > By occupation > Agriculture 15.7%
Ranked 104th.
44.6%
Ranked 56th. 3 times more than Brazil

Taxes and other revenues 39.4% of GDP
Ranked 43th. 48% more than Morocco
26.7% of GDP
Ranked 97th.

Gross domestic savings > Current US$ per capita 1,067.19$
Ranked 46th. 3 times more than Morocco
327.78$
Ranked 73th.

Debt > External per capita $1,207.39
Ranked 69th. 86% more than Morocco
$649.23
Ranked 81st.

Tax > Tax rates 23.78
Ranked 56th.
36.02
Ranked 26th. 51% more than Brazil

Investment > Gross fixed 18.9% of GDP
Ranked 108th.
31.2% of GDP
Ranked 16th. 65% more than Brazil

Imports > Partners China 15.3%, US 14.6%, Argentina 7.4%, Germany 6.4%, South Korea 4.1% Spain 13.1%, France 12.1%, China 6.9%, US 6.8%, Saudi Arabia 6.2%, Italy 5.1%, Russia 5%, Germany 4.9%
GDP per person 8,121.5
Ranked 56th. 3 times more than Morocco
2,811.03
Ranked 98th.

Tax > Tax payments > Number 9
Ranked 151st. 50% more than Morocco
6
Ranked 180th.

Trade > Imports per capita $961.53
Ranked 94th.
$1,080.51
Ranked 86th. 12% more than Brazil

Reserves of foreign exchange and gold per capita $936.86
Ranked 59th. 16% more than Morocco
$806.08
Ranked 64th.

GDP per capita in 1950 $1,673.00
Ranked 30th. 4% more than Morocco
$1,611.00
Ranked 32nd.
Currency real Moroccan dirham
Budget > Revenues > Per capita $2,434.82 per capita
Ranked 18th. 4 times more than Morocco
$606.98 per capita
Ranked 96th.

Poverty > Population under $1 a day 11.6%
Ranked 43th. 6 times more than Morocco
2%
Ranked 57th.
Real interest rate 44.93%
Ranked 1st. 5 times more than Morocco
9.9%
Ranked 37th.

GDP > Official exchange rate per capita $10,368.31
Ranked 58th. 4 times more than Morocco
$2,898.01
Ranked 108th.

GDP > Composition, by end use > Exports of goods and services 12.6%
Ranked 187th.
36.2%
Ranked 106th. 3 times more than Brazil
Poverty and inequality > Richest quintile to poorest quintile ratio 21.8
Ranked 1st. 3 times more than Morocco
7.2
Ranked 3rd.
GDP > Composition, by end use > Household consumption 62.3%
Ranked 102nd. 4% more than Morocco
59.7%
Ranked 116th.
Labor force > By occupation > Services 71%
Ranked 8th. Twice as much as Morocco
35.5%
Ranked 16th.
Companies > Listed domestic companies, total 353
Ranked 24th. 5 times more than Morocco
76
Ranked 63th.

Outbound tourist spending 13.27 billion
Ranked 22nd. 7 times more than Morocco
1.91 billion
Ranked 53th.

GDP > Composition, by sector of origin > Agriculture 5.2%
Ranked 123th.
15.1%
Ranked 64th. 3 times more than Brazil
GNI > Current US$ per capita 4,140.63$
Ranked 63th. 2 times more than Morocco
1,702.86$
Ranked 96th.

Inflation 119.66
Ranked 92nd. 8% more than Morocco
110.39
Ranked 139th.

Deposit interest rate 17.63%
Ranked 4th. 5 times more than Morocco
3.52%
Ranked 81st.

Trade > Exports > By good > Passenger cars etc 2.66 million
Ranked 15th. 882 times more than Morocco
3,011
Ranked 55th.
GDP > Composition, by sector of origin > Industry 26.3%
Ranked 110th.
31.7%
Ranked 69th. 21% more than Brazil
Foreign direct investment > Net > BoP > Current US$ per capita 68.1 BoP $
Ranked 60th. 35% more than Morocco
50.61 BoP $
Ranked 69th.

Tourist arrivals by region of origin > Europe 2.1 million
Ranked 33th.
2.61 million
Ranked 29th. 24% more than Brazil

Tax > GDP per capita > Constant LCU 8,775.22
Ranked 136th.
21,160.15
Ranked 112th. 2 times more than Brazil

Imports per capita $1,123.55
Ranked 126th.
$1,195.53
Ranked 121st. 6% more than Brazil

Tourism > International tourism, number of arrivals 5.43 million
Ranked 45th.
9.34 million
Ranked 28th. 72% more than Brazil

Trade > Exports $199.70 billion
Ranked 23th. 14 times more than Morocco
$14.49 billion
Ranked 74th.

Tax > Taxes on income, profits and capital gains > Current LCU 294.31 billion
Ranked 26th. 4 times more than Morocco
68.46 billion
Ranked 50th.

Financial sector > Exchange rates and prices > GDP deflator > Base year varies by country 200.69
Ranked 63th. 67% more than Morocco
119.93
Ranked 142nd.

Trade > Imports $187.70 billion
Ranked 21st. 5 times more than Morocco
$34.19 billion
Ranked 53th.

Currency > GDP > Constant 2000 US$ per capita $5,721.23
Ranked 72nd. 2 times more than Morocco
$2,558.94
Ranked 108th.

Income > GNI per capita, PPP > Current international $ $11,530.00
Ranked 66th. 2 times more than Morocco
$5,060.00
Ranked 100th.

Aid per capita > Current US$ 1.03$
Ranked 135th.
21.61$
Ranked 91st. 21 times more than Brazil

Poverty > Share of all poor people 1.82%
Ranked 7th. 36 times more than Morocco
0.05%
Ranked 53th.
Economy growth -0.19
Ranked 85th.
4.95
Ranked 24th.

GDP > By type of expenditure > Household consumption expenditure 1.41 trillion
Ranked 6th. 24 times more than Morocco
57.38 billion
Ranked 57th.

Retail > Gross value added by wholesale, retail trade, restaurants and hotels 407.28 billion
Ranked 3rd. 35 times more than Morocco
11.55 billion
Ranked 60th.

Trade > Exports > Per $ GDP $0.13 per $1 of GDP
Ranked 139th.
$0.20 per $1 of GDP
Ranked 114th. 54% more than Brazil

Debt > Central government debt, total > Current LCU 2.19 trillion
Ranked 13th. 5 times more than Morocco
456.19 billion
Ranked 27th.

GDP > Composition, by end use > Government consumption 21.5%
Ranked 32nd. 12% more than Morocco
19.2%
Ranked 57th.
New businesses registered > Number > Per capita 2.63 per 1,000 people
Ranked 22nd. 4 times more than Morocco
0.735 per 1,000 people
Ranked 34th.

Companies > Ease of doing business index > 1=most business-friendly regulations 116
Ranked 73th. 33% more than Morocco
87
Ranked 102nd.

Interest rate spread > Lending rate minus deposit rate 37.75%
Ranked 3rd. 5 times more than Morocco
7.89%
Ranked 52nd.

Industrial production growth rate -0.8%
Ranked 133th.
0.7%
Ranked 122nd.

GDP > PPP $1.48 trillion
Ranked 9th. 12 times more than Morocco
$127.23 billion
Ranked 53th.
Poverty > Population under $2 a day 26.5%
Ranked 48th. 4 times more than Morocco
7.5%
Ranked 56th.
Trade > Imports > By good > Passenger cars etc 594,310
Ranked 39th. 98% more than Morocco
300,298
Ranked 55th.
Reserves of foreign exchange and gold $373.10 billion
Ranked 7th. 21 times more than Morocco
$17.54 billion
Ranked 60th.

GDP deflator 240.9
Ranked 57th.
276.41
Ranked 55th. 15% more than Brazil

GDP per capita > Constant LCU 4314.88 5487.91
Income > GNI per capita, PPP > Constant 2005 international $ $10,097.09
Ranked 49th. 2 times more than Morocco
$4,443.56
Ranked 72nd.

International tourism > Number of arrivals 5.36 million
Ranked 34th.
5.84 million
Ranked 32nd. 9% more than Brazil

Size of economy > Share of world GDP 1.9%
Ranked 8th. 17 times more than Morocco
0.11%
Ranked 57th.
Economic growth > Per capita -1.09
Ranked 77th.
3.65
Ranked 18th.

Currency > Monetary unit 1 real = 100 centavos Dirham = 100 centimes
Micro > Small and medium enterprises > Number > Per capita 27.41 per 1,000 people
Ranked 6th. 78% more than Morocco
15.42 per 1,000 people
Ranked 10th.
GDP > CIA Factbook $1.38 trillion
Ranked 9th. 11 times more than Morocco
$128.30 billion
Ranked 50th.

Household final > Consumption expenditure > Current US$ per capita 2,373.46$
Ranked 59th. 2 times more than Morocco
995.52$
Ranked 78th.

Balance of payments > Capital and financial account > Foreign direct investment > Net inflows > BoP > Current US $25.95 billion
Ranked 11th. 13 times more than Morocco
$1.97 billion
Ranked 56th.

Budget > Revenues per capita $2,378.97
Ranked 51st. 3 times more than Morocco
$740.15
Ranked 92nd.

Poverty and inequality > Causes of poverty > Living Standards 20.7%
Ranked 25th.
37%
Ranked 9th. 79% more than Brazil
International tourism > Number of departures 4.7 million
Ranked 23th. 3 times more than Morocco
1.75 million
Ranked 47th.

Labor force > By occupation > Industry 13.3%
Ranked 127th.
19.8%
Ranked 81st. 49% more than Brazil

Reserves > Total reserves > Includes gold, current US$ $373.16 billion
Ranked 7th. 21 times more than Morocco
$17.54 billion
Ranked 57th.

Income > Household final consumption expenditure, PPP > Constant 2005 international $ $1.16 trillion
Ranked 9th. 15 times more than Morocco
$76.90 billion
Ranked 50th.

Income > GDP per capita, PPP > Current international $ $11,715.70
Ranked 75th. 2 times more than Morocco
$5,219.88
Ranked 108th.

GDP > Composition, by end use > Imports of goods and services -14%
Ranked 1st.
-50.4%
Ranked 102nd. 4 times more than Brazil
International tourism > Expenditures > Current US$ per capita 31.72$
Ranked 86th.
33.16$
Ranked 83th. 5% more than Brazil

Gross national saving 15.2% of GDP
Ranked 102nd.
25.1% of GDP
Ranked 47th. 65% more than Brazil

Debt > Net foreign assets > Current LCU 527.5 billion
Ranked 54th. 4 times more than Morocco
140.4 billion
Ranked 80th.

Companies > Listed domestic companies, total per million 1.78
Ranked 96th.
2.34
Ranked 89th. 32% more than Brazil

Companies > Stock market > Stocks traded, total value > Current US$ $834.53 billion
Ranked 13th. 238 times more than Morocco
$3.50 billion
Ranked 53th.

GDP > Composition, by end use > Investment in fixed capital 18.1%
Ranked 139th.
31.4%
Ranked 25th. 73% more than Brazil
Tax > Taxes on international trade > Current LCU 27.89 billion
Ranked 34th. 2 times more than Morocco
13.65 billion
Ranked 38th.

Poverty and inequality > Population below $1 (PPP) per day $6.14%
Ranked 16th. 2 times more than Morocco
$2.52%
Ranked 23th.

GDP > Constant 2000 US$ 670.45 billion constant 2000 US$
Ranked 10th. 16 times more than Morocco
40.91 billion constant 2000 US$
Ranked 58th.

Patents granted 2 per million people
Ranked 51st.
3 per million people
Ranked 48th. 50% more than Brazil
Government spending 162.71 billion
Ranked 10th. 16 times more than Morocco
9.9 billion
Ranked 40th.

Gross domestic savings 258.56 billion
Ranked 11th. 11 times more than Morocco
22.9 billion
Ranked 48th.

Bank liquid > Reserves to bank assets ratio 7.33
Ranked 106th.
11.9
Ranked 69th. 62% more than Brazil

Debt > Government debt > Gross government debt, share of GDP 68.47 IMF
Ranked 41st. 15% more than Morocco
59.59 IMF
Ranked 51st.
Companies > Market capitalization of listed companies > Current US$ $1.23 trillion
Ranked 11th. 23 times more than Morocco
$52.63 billion
Ranked 49th.

Debt > External > Per $ GDP $165.27 per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 106th.
$290.19 per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 84th. 76% more than Brazil

Tax > Taxes on income, profits and capital gains > Current LCU per capita 1,494.47
Ranked 70th.
2,135.4
Ranked 60th. 43% more than Brazil

Tax > GDP > Current LCU 4.4 trillion
Ranked 49th. 5 times more than Morocco
828.17 billion
Ranked 92nd.

Currency > GDP > Constant 2000 US$ $1.14 trillion
Ranked 12th. 14 times more than Morocco
$83.22 billion
Ranked 57th.

Stock of direct foreign investment > At home $604.50 billion
Ranked 14th. 13 times more than Morocco
$48.18 billion
Ranked 53th.

Business > Companies > Specific companies > Carrefour > First store 1,975
Ranked 4th.
2,000
Ranked 16th. 1% more than Brazil
Debt > Interest rates > Central bank discount rate 7.5%
Ranked 47th. 3 times more than Morocco
3%
Ranked 76th.
Balance of payments > Capital and financial account > Portfolio investment > Excluding LCFAR > BoP > Current US$ $50.28 billion
Ranked 7th.
$-16,595,535.80
Ranked 87th.

GNI 1.54 trillion
Ranked 9th. 17 times more than Morocco
89.49 billion
Ranked 51st.

Debt > IMF charges > INT, current US$ $1.32 million
Ranked 21st. 5 times more than Morocco
$257,000.00
Ranked 41st.

Poverty and inequality > Causes of poverty > Education 39%
Ranked 4th. 10% more than Morocco
35.5%
Ranked 2nd.
Trade balance with US $-1,690,300,000.00
Ranked 207th.
$36.90 million
Ranked 25th.
Lending interest rate 55.38%
Ranked 3rd. 5 times more than Morocco
11.5%
Ranked 73th.

GDP growth > Duration 1980-2000 5%
Ranked 67th.
24%
Ranked 54th. 5 times more than Brazil
GDP > Current LCU 1937598000000 457620000000
Income > Health expenditure per capita, PPP > Constant 2005 international $ $1,042.73
Ranked 59th. 3 times more than Morocco
$303.56
Ranked 116th.

GDP > PPP per capita $8,058.57
Ranked 62nd. 89% more than Morocco
$4,261.41
Ranked 98th.
Total > Reserves in months of imports 5.09
Ranked 32nd.
8.37
Ranked 10th. 64% more than Brazil

Income > GDP, PPP > Current international $ $2.33 trillion
Ranked 10th. 13 times more than Morocco
$172.62 billion
Ranked 55th.

Inflation > Consumer price index > 2005 = 100 141.27
Ranked 84th. 24% more than Morocco
113.95
Ranked 163th.

Stock of domestic credit $2.38 trillion
Ranked 10th. 21 times more than Morocco
$111.60 billion
Ranked 49th.

Companies > Trademark applications, total 152,735
Ranked 5th. 14 times more than Morocco
11,052
Ranked 43th.

Money and quasi money > M2 > Current LCU 1167526000000 474757000000
Labor force per thousand people 0.000522
Ranked 103th. 55% more than Morocco
0.000337
Ranked 186th.

Royalty and license fees > Payments > BoP > Current US$ 1.4 billion BoP $
Ranked 18th. 31 times more than Morocco
45.41 million BoP $
Ranked 51st.

Net income > BoP > Current US$ > Per capita -139,306.37 BoP $ per 1,000 people
Ranked 88th. 13 times more than Morocco
-10,429.6 BoP $ per 1,000 people
Ranked 45th.

Economic aid > Recipient $191.90 million
Ranked 68th.
$651.80 million
Ranked 28th. 3 times more than Brazil

Current transfers > Receipts > BoP > Current US$ 4.05 billion BoP $
Ranked 32nd.
5.53 billion BoP $
Ranked 24th. 37% more than Brazil

Tourism > International tourism, number of departures 6.43 million
Ranked 33th. 3 times more than Morocco
2.19 million
Ranked 46th.

Government > Revenue > Tax revenue as percentage of GDP 34.4
Ranked 31st. 54% more than Morocco
22.3
Ranked 76th.
Entrepreneurship > Starting a Business > Index ranking 98
Ranked 57th. 96% more than Morocco
50
Ranked 105th.
Net barter terms of trade 101.29%
Ranked 13th. 2% more than Morocco
99.79%
Ranked 18th.

Market value of publicly traded shares $1.23 trillion
Ranked 7th. 20 times more than Morocco
$60.09 billion
Ranked 45th.

High-technology > Exports > Current US$ > Per capita $53,842.24 per 1,000 people
Ranked 48th. 2 times more than Morocco
$25,413.21 per 1,000 people
Ranked 62nd.

Poverty > Gap at $1 a day > PPP 3.37%
Ranked 5th. 7 times more than Morocco
0.5%
Ranked 16th.

Household spending per capita 2,976.71
Ranked 41st. 3 times more than Morocco
1,044.22
Ranked 65th.

Balance of payments > Current account > Balances > Current account balance > Current US$ $-24,302,262,100.00
Ranked 134th. 5 times more than Morocco
$-4,971,330,652.31
Ranked 121st.

International tourism > Receipts > Current US$ 4.17 billion$
Ranked 34th.
5.43 billion$
Ranked 31st. 30% more than Brazil

Companies > Stock market > Business extent of disclosure index > 0=less disclosure to 10=more disclosure 5
Ranked 104th.
6
Ranked 85th. 20% more than Brazil

Net capital account > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 0.834 BoP $ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 75th.
-0.087 BoP $ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 85th.

Trade > Exports > By good > Chocolate cocoa preparations 104,256
Ranked 17th. 8688 times more than Morocco
12
Ranked 77th.
Poverty and inequality > Inequality adjusted income index 0.411
Ranked 80th.
0.43
Ranked 72nd. 5% more than Brazil
Development > Human Development Index 0.73
Ranked 85th. 24% more than Morocco
0.591
Ranked 129th.

Tourist arrivals by region of origin > Africa 75,676
Ranked 39th.
143,855
Ranked 24th. 90% more than Brazil

Foreign direct investment > Net inflows > BoP > Current US$ 15.19 billion BoP $
Ranked 16th. 10 times more than Morocco
1.55 billion BoP $
Ranked 58th.

Income > GNI, PPP > Current international $ per capita $11,532.57
Ranked 66th. 2 times more than Morocco
$5,147.83
Ranked 99th.

GDP per capita in 1973 $3,913.00
Ranked 29th. 2 times more than Morocco
$1,651.00
Ranked 39th.
Business > Companies > Specific companies > Carrefour > Hard Discounters 300
Ranked 2nd.
None
Debt > Banks > Automated teller machines > ATMs > Per 100,000 adults 118.6
Ranked 9th. 5 times more than Morocco
23.45
Ranked 105th.

Royalty and license fees > Receipts > BoP > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 127.7 BoP $ per $1 million of
Ranked 62nd.
246.43 BoP $ per $1 million of
Ranked 53th. 93% more than Brazil

Trade > Imports > By good > Silver platinum etc 121,017
Ranked 14th. 230 times more than Morocco
526
Ranked 54th.
Debt > Net domestic credit > Current LCU 4.87 trillion
Ranked 29th. 5 times more than Morocco
955.37 billion
Ranked 68th.

Tax > GDP per capita > Current LCU 22,161.61
Ranked 132nd.
25,042.51
Ranked 127th. 13% more than Brazil

Size of economy > GDP > GDP growth 0.873%
Ranked 136th.
2.69%
Ranked 102nd. 3 times more than Brazil

Tax > GDP > Constant LCU 1.74 trillion
Ranked 50th. 2 times more than Morocco
699.78 billion
Ranked 77th.

GDP > PPP > Constant 2000 international $ per capita 7,485.81 PPP 2000 $
Ranked 59th. 84% more than Morocco
4,058.1 PPP 2000 $
Ranked 93th.

Current account balance per capita 0.0
Ranked 71st.
0.0
Ranked 122nd.

Entrepreneurship > Hiring and Firing > Index ranking 144
Ranked 11th. 16% more than Morocco
124
Ranked 31st.
Poverty and inequality > Population below national poverty line > Total 21.4%
Ranked 26th. 2 times more than Morocco
9%
Ranked 37th.

Debt > Interest payments > Current LCU 249.42 billion
Ranked 20th. 30 times more than Morocco
8.45 billion
Ranked 59th.

Net trade in goods and services > BoP > Current US$ 36.61 billion BoP $
Ranked 9th.
-3,951,169,000 BoP $
Ranked 120th.

Income receipts > BoP > Current US$ per capita 17.16 BoP $
Ranked 100th.
22.86 BoP $
Ranked 95th. 33% more than Brazil

Net income > BoP > Current US$ -25,967,390,000 BoP $
Ranked 135th. 83 times more than Morocco
-314,376,400 BoP $
Ranked 72nd.

Net capital account > BoP > Current US$ 663.72 million BoP $
Ranked 17th.
-4,509,148 BoP $
Ranked 94th.

Foreign direct investment > Net inflows > BoP > Current US$ per capita 81.62 BoP $
Ranked 78th. 58% more than Morocco
51.5 BoP $
Ranked 92nd.

Tourism > International tourism, number of arrivals per capita 0.0276
Ranked 142nd.
0.291
Ranked 91st. 11 times more than Brazil

Trade > Exports > Exports of goods and services 283.06 billion
Ranked 20th. 8 times more than Morocco
34.73 billion
Ranked 65th.

Micro > Small and medium enterprises > Number per 1000 27.33
Ranked 6th. 78% more than Morocco
15.35
Ranked 11th.
Budget > Expenditures per capita $2,830.80
Ranked 51st. 3 times more than Morocco
$855.81
Ranked 92nd.

Debt service 75.44
Ranked 2nd. 4 times more than Morocco
17.8
Ranked 37th.
GDP > Composition, by end use > Investment in inventories -0.5%
Ranked 156th.
3.9%
Ranked 13th.
Gross National Income > Constant LCU 764199400000 158053200000
Innovation > Research and development personnel > By sector > Business enterprise sector (full time employment) 35,970
Ranked 11th. 238 times more than Morocco
151
Ranked 49th.

Big Mac Index > Per $ GDP $0.06 per $14.1 billion of GDP
Ranked 54th.
$0.77 per $14.1 billion of GDP
Ranked 25th. 12 times more than Brazil
Terms of trade 142
Ranked 8th. 22% more than Morocco
116
Ranked 16th.
Foreign direct investment > Net > BoP > Current US$ 12.68 billion BoP $
Ranked 5th. 8 times more than Morocco
1.52 billion BoP $
Ranked 38th.

Income > GNI, PPP > Current international $ $2.29 trillion
Ranked 10th. 14 times more than Morocco
$167.41 billion
Ranked 51st.

Trade > Exports > Primary 40%
Ranked 59th. 11% more than Morocco
36%
Ranked 62nd.
Current account balance > BoP > Current US$ per capita 76.28 BoP $
Ranked 33th. 2 times more than Morocco
36.84 BoP $
Ranked 41st.

Patent applications > Residents 3,810
Ranked 11th. 22 times more than Morocco
177
Ranked 43th.

Poverty and inequality > Population in severe poverty 0.2%
Ranked 25th.
3.3%
Ranked 10th. 17 times more than Brazil
Total > Reserves minus gold > Current US$ 53.57 billion$
Ranked 12th. 3 times more than Morocco
16.19 billion$
Ranked 41st.

Gross domestic savings > Current US$ > Per $ GDP 249.54$ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 43th. 30% more than Morocco
191.29$ per $1,000 of GDP
Ranked 62nd.

Companies > Stock market > Stocks traded, total value > Current US$ per capita $4,200.90
Ranked 32nd. 39 times more than Morocco
$107.65
Ranked 64th.

Saving rate 14.61
Ranked 78th.
31.16
Ranked 13th. 2 times more than Brazil

Welfare > Revenue, excluding grants > Current LCU 1.03 trillion
Ranked 28th. 4 times more than Morocco
268.26 billion
Ranked 53th.

Debt > External debt stocks $404.32 billion
Ranked 3rd. 14 times more than Morocco
$29.05 billion
Ranked 28th.

Government > Revenue > Tax > Taxes local income of resident citizens yes yes
Purchasing power parity > GDP per capita > PPP > Current international $ $10,412.12
Ranked 64th. 2 times more than Morocco
$4,494.42
Ranked 98th.

Spending > General government final consumption expenditure > Constant LCU 329.63 billion
Ranked 35th. 3 times more than Morocco
113.46 billion
Ranked 55th.

GNI > Atlas method > Current US$ per capita 3,556.36$
Ranked 62nd. 2 times more than Morocco
1,746.83$
Ranked 88th.

Stocks traded > Turnover ratio 42.54%
Ranked 19th. 29% more than Morocco
32.85%
Ranked 22nd.

Poverty and inequality > Richest 10% to poorest 10% ratio 40.6
Ranked 1st. 3 times more than Morocco
11.7
Ranked 3rd.
Poverty and inequality > Causes of poverty > Health 40.2%
Ranked 10th. 46% more than Morocco
27.5%
Ranked 8th.
Retail > Gross value added by wholesale, retail trade, restaurants and hotels per capita 2,050.19
Ranked 65th. 6 times more than Morocco
355.15
Ranked 142nd.

Innovation > Research and development personnel > By sector > Higher education sector (Headcounts) 188,003 Number
Ranked 5th. 5 times more than Morocco
35,322 Number
Ranked 7th.

Gross capital formation > Current US$ 163.76 billion$
Ranked 10th. 12 times more than Morocco
13.27 billion$
Ranked 52nd.

Net domestic credit > Current LCU 1653422000000 402699000000
Balance of payments > Current account > Balances > Net trade in goods and services > Current US$ $6.04 billion
Ranked 30th.
$-10,926,909,415.69
Ranked 132nd.

Tax > Social security contributions 22.86%
Ranked 31st. 2 times more than Morocco
10.35%
Ranked 49th.

Portfolio investment > Equity > DRS > Current US$ 6.45 billion$
Ranked 4th. 101 times more than Morocco
63.7 million$
Ranked 23th.

Current account balance > BoP > Current US$ 14.2 billion BoP $
Ranked 19th. 13 times more than Morocco
1.11 billion BoP $
Ranked 35th.

GNI > PPP > Current international $ 1.52 trillion PPP $
Ranked 9th. 11 times more than Morocco
136.66 billion PPP $
Ranked 51st.

Innovation > Patent applications, residents per million 13.86
Ranked 62nd. 3 times more than Morocco
5.27
Ranked 69th.

Poverty > Poverty gap at national poverty line 19.6%
Ranked 3rd. 4 times more than Morocco
4.4%
Ranked 5th.
Income > PPP conversion factor, GDP > LCU per international $ $1.89
Ranked 115th.
$4.80
Ranked 96th. 3 times more than Brazil

Income > GDP per capita, PPP > Constant 2005 international $ $10,263.89
Ranked 73th. 2 times more than Morocco
$4,573.04
Ranked 108th.

Income > GDP, PPP > Current international $ per capita $11,715.70
Ranked 75th. 2 times more than Morocco
$5,308.06
Ranked 108th.

Income > GDP, PPP > Constant 2005 international $ per capita $10,263.89
Ranked 73th. 2 times more than Morocco
$4,650.29
Ranked 108th.

Market capitalization of listed companies > Current US$ per capita 3,779.75$
Ranked 22nd. 2 times more than Morocco
1,623.95$
Ranked 34th.

Stocks traded > Total value > Current US$ 254.51 billion$
Ranked 7th. 19 times more than Morocco
13.5 billion$
Ranked 24th.

Government > Revenue > Tax > Taxes local income of nonresident individuals yes yes
GDP > Median household income (PPP) $9,177.00
Ranked 67th. 13% more than Morocco
$8,093.00
Ranked 74th.
Intellectual property > Copyright > Copyright duration relative to life of author Life 70 years Life 50 years
Oil > Exports 699,000 bbl/day
Ranked 22nd. 28 times more than Morocco
25,090 bbl/day
Ranked 83th.

Debt > Credit depth of information index > 0=low to 6=high 5
Ranked 46th. The same as Morocco
5
Ranked 74th.

Debt > Strength of legal rights index > 0=weak to 10=strong 3
Ranked 159th. The same as Morocco
3
Ranked 169th.

Innovation > Military expenditure > Current LCU 64.8 billion
Ranked 47th. 2 times more than Morocco
29.36 billion
Ranked 63th.

Purchasing power parity > Gross domestic product per capita > PPP 9,454.86
Ranked 63th. 2 times more than Morocco
4,081.22
Ranked 97th.

Balance of payments > Foreign investment > Net > USD 36.03 billion
Ranked 2nd. 24 times more than Morocco
1.49 billion
Ranked 42nd.

Household spending 576.69 billion
Ranked 9th. 17 times more than Morocco
33.94 billion
Ranked 45th.

Welfare > Social contributions > Current LCU 259.23 billion
Ranked 17th. 6 times more than Morocco
43.33 billion
Ranked 35th.

Trade > Export value index 214.77%
Ranked 3rd. 81% more than Morocco
118.7%
Ranked 23th.

Innovation > Research and development personnel > By sector > Business enterprise sector 41,317
Ranked 10th. 274 times more than Morocco
151
Ranked 48th.

Transnational corporations > Affiliates 8,050
Ranked 12th. 52 times more than Morocco
156
Ranked 70th.