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People Stats: compare key data on Catholic countries & Non-religious countries

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Definitions

  • Age structure > 0-14 years: The distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Age structure > 65 years and over: The distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest."
  • Birth rate: The average annual number of births during a year per 1,000 persons in the population at midyear; also known as crude birth rate. The birth rate is usually the dominant factor in determining the rate of population growth. It depends on both the level of fertility and the age structure of the population.
  • Death rate: The average annual number of deaths during a year per 1,000 population at midyear; also known as crude death rate. The death rate, while only a rough indicator of the mortality situation in a country, accurately indicates the current mortality impact on population growth. This indicator is significantly affected by age distribution, and most countries will eventually show a rise in the overall death rate, in spite of continued decline in mortality at all ages, as declining fertility results in an aging population.
  • Death rate, crude > Per 1,000 people: Death rate, crude (per 1,000 people). Crude death rate indicates the number of deaths occurring during the year, per 1,000 population estimated at midyear. Subtracting the crude death rate from the crude birth rate provides the rate of natural increase, which is equal to the rate of population change in the absence of migration.
  • Median age > Total: This entry is derived from People > Median age, which is the age that divides a population into two numerically equal groups; that is, half the people are younger than this age and half are older. It is a single index that summarizes the age distribution of a population. Currently, the median age ranges from a low of about 15 in Uganda and Gaza Strip to 40 or more in several European countries and Japan. See the entry for "Age structure" for the importance of a young versus an older age structure and, by implication, a low versus a higher median age.
  • Migration > Net migration > Per capita: Net migration is the net total of migrants during the period, that is, the total number of immigrants less the annual number of emigrants, including both citizens and noncitizens. Data are five-year estimates. To derive estimates of net migration, the United Nations Population Division takes into account the past migration history of a country or area, the migration policy of a country, and the influx of refugees in recent periods. The data to calculate these official estimates come from a variety of sources, including border statistics, administrative records, surveys, and censuses. When no official estimates can be made because of insufficient data, net migration is derived through the balance equation, which is the difference between overall population growth and the natural increase during the 1990-2000 intercensal period." Per capita figures expressed per 1 million population.
  • Migration > Net migration rate: The difference between the number of persons entering and leaving a country during the year per 1,000 persons (based on midyear population). An excess of persons entering the country is referred to as net immigration (e.g., 3.56 migrants/1,000 population); an excess of persons leaving the country as net emigration (e.g., -9.26 migrants/1,000 population). The net migration rate indicates the contribution of migration to the overall level of population change. High levels of migration can cause problems such as increasing unemployment and potential ethnic strife (if people are coming in) or a reduction in the labor force, perhaps in certain key sectors (if people are leaving).
  • Obesity > Adult obesity rate: This entry gives the percent of a country's population considered to be obese. Obesity is defined as an adult having a Body Mass Index (BMI) greater to or equal to 30.0. BMI is calculated by taking a person's weight in kg and dividing it by the person's squared height in meters.
  • Population: Population, total refers to the total population.
  • Population growth rate: The average annual percent change in the population, resulting from a surplus (or deficit) of births over deaths and the balance of migrants entering and leaving a country. The rate may be positive or negative. The growth rate is a factor in determining how great a burden would be imposed on a country by the changing needs of its people for infrastructure (e.g., schools, hospitals, housing, roads), resources (e.g., food, water, electricity), and jobs. Rapid population growth can be seen as threatening by neighboring countries.
  • Sex ratio > At birth: The number of males for each female one of five age groups - at birth, under 15 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over, and for the total population. Sex ratio at birth has recently emerged as an indicator of certain kinds of sex discrimination in some countries. For instance, high sex ratios at birth in some Asian countries are now attributed to sex-selective abortion and infanticide due to a strong preference for sons. This will affect future marriage patterns and fertility patterns. Eventually it could cause unrest among young adult males who are unable to find partners.
  • Sex ratio > Total population: The number of males for each female one of five age groups - at birth, under 15 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over, and for the total population. Sex ratio at birth has recently emerged as an indicator of certain kinds of sex discrimination in some countries. For instance, high sex ratios at birth in some Asian countries are now attributed to sex-selective abortion and infanticide due to a strong preference for sons. This will affect future marriage patterns and fertility patterns. Eventually it could cause unrest among young adult males who are unable to find partners.
  • Total fertility rate: The average number of children that would be born per woman if all women lived to the end of their child-bearing years and bore children according to a given fertility rate at each age. The total fertility rate is a more direct measure of the level of fertility than the crude birth rate, since it refers to births per woman. This indicator shows the potential for population growth in the country. High rates will also place some limits on the labor force participation rates for women. Large numbers of children born to women indicate large family sizes that might limit the ability of the families to feed and educate their children.
  • Urban population: Urban population is the midyear population of areas defined as urban in each country and reported to the United Nations.
  • Life expectancy at birth > Total population: This entry is derived from People > Life expectancy at birth, which contains the average number of years to be lived by a group of people born in the same year, if mortality at each age remains constant in the future. The entry includes total population as well as the male and female components. Life expectancy at birth is also a measure of overall quality of life in a country and summarizes the mortality at all ages. It can also be thought of as indicating the potential return on investment in human capital and is necessary for the calculation of various actuarial measures.
  • Age structure > 15-64 years: The distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Literacy > Total population: This entry is derived from People > Literacy, which includes a definition of literacy and Census Bureau percentages for the total population, males, and females. There are no universal definitions and standards of literacy. Unless otherwise specified, all rates are based on the most common definition - the ability to read and write at a specified age. Detailing the standards that individual countries use to assess the ability to read and write is beyond the scope of the Factbook. Information on literacy, while not a perfect measure of educational results, is probably the most easily available and valid for international comparisons. Low levels of literacy, and education in general, can impede the economic development of a country in the current rapidly changing, technology-driven world.
    Additional details:
    • Gibraltar: above 80% (2013)
  • Dependency ratios > Youth dependency ratio: This entry is derived from People > Dependency ratios, which dependency ratios are a measure of the age structure of a population. They relate the number of individuals that are likely to be economically "dependent" on the support of others. Dependency ratios contrast the ratio of youths (ages 0-14) and the elderly (ages 65+) to the number of those in the working-age group (ages 15-64). Changes in the dependency ratio provide an indication of potential social support requirements resulting from changes in population age structures. As fertility levels decline, the dependency ratio initially falls because the proportion of youths decreases while the proportion of the population of working age increases. As fertility levels continue to decline, dependency ratios eventually increase because the proportion of the population of working age starts to decline and the proportion of elderly persons continues to increase.
    total dependency ratio - The total dependency ratio is the ratio of combined youth population (ages 0-14) and elderly population (ages 65+) per 100 people of working age (ages 15-64). A high total dependency ratio indicates that the working-age population and the overall economy face a greater burden to support and provide social services for youth and elderly persons, who are often economically dependent.
    youth dependency ratio - The youth dependency ratio is the ratio of the youth population (ages 0-14) per 100 people of working age (ages 15-64). A high youth dependency ratio indicates that a greater investment needs to be made in schooling and other services for children.
    elderly dependency ratio - The elderly dependency ratio is the ratio of the elderly population (ages 65+) per 100 people of working age (ages 15-64). Increases in the elderly dependency ratio put added pressure on governments to fund pensions and healthcare.
    potential support ratio - The potential support ratio is the number of working-age people (ages 15-64) per one elderly person (ages 65+). As a population ages, the potential support ratio tends to fall, meaning there are fewer potential workers to support the elderly.
  • Migration > Net migration: Net migration is the net total of migrants during the period, that is, the total number of immigrants less the annual number of emigrants, including both citizens and noncitizens. Data are five-year estimates. To derive estimates of net migration, the United Nations Population Division takes into account the past migration history of a country or area, the migration policy of a country, and the influx of refugees in recent periods. The data to calculate these official estimates come from a variety of sources, including border statistics, administrative records, surveys, and censuses. When no official estimates can be made because of insufficient data, net migration is derived through the balance equation, which is the difference between overall population growth and the natural increase during the 1990-2000 intercensal period."
  • Population > CIA Factbook: This entry gives an estimate from the US Bureau of the Census based on statistics from population censuses, vital statistics registration systems, or sample surveys pertaining to the recent past and on assumptions about future trends. The total population presents one overall measure of the potential impact of the country on the world and within its region. Note: starting with the 1993 Factbook, demographic estimates for some countries (mostly African) have explicitly taken into account the effects of the growing impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. These countries are currently: The Bahamas, Benin, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burma, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Republic of the Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
  • Teenage pregancy rate: Adolescent fertility rate is the number of births per 1,000 women ages 15-19."
  • Population density: Population density is midyear population divided by land area in square kilometers. Population is based on the de facto definition of population, which counts all residents regardless of legal status or citizenship--except for refugees not permanently settled in the country of asylum, who are generally considered part of the population of their country of origin. Land area is a country's total area, excluding area under inland water bodies, national claims to continental shelf, and exclusive economic zones. In most cases the definition of inland water bodies includes major rivers and lakes."
  • Sex ratio > Under 15 years: The number of males for each female one of five age groups - at birth, under 15 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over, and for the total population. Sex ratio at birth has recently emerged as an indicator of certain kinds of sex discrimination in some countries. For instance, high sex ratios at birth in some Asian countries are now attributed to sex-selective abortion and infanticide due to a strong preference for sons. This will affect future marriage patterns and fertility patterns. Eventually it could cause unrest among young adult males who are unable to find partners.
  • Infant mortality rate > Total: This entry is derived from People > Infant mortality rate, which gives the number of deaths of infants under one year old in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year; included is the total death rate, and deaths by sex, male and female. This rate is often used as an indicator of the level of health in a country.
  • Age structure > 25-54 years: This entry is derived from People > Age structure, which provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group as follows: 0-14 years (children), 15-24 years (early working age), 25-54 years (prime working age), 55-64 years (mature working age), 65 years and over (elderly). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Age structure > 15-24 years: This entry is derived from People > Age structure, which provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group as follows: 0-14 years (children), 15-24 years (early working age), 25-54 years (prime working age), 55-64 years (mature working age), 65 years and over (elderly). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Rural population: Rural population is calculated as the difference between the total population and the urban population.
  • Migration > Refugee population by country or territory of origin: Refugees are people who are recognized as refugees under the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees or its 1967 Protocol, the 1969 Organisation of African Unity Convention Governing the Specific Aspects of Refugee Problems in Africa, people recognized as refugees in accordance with the UNHCR statute, people granted refugee-like humanitarian status, and people provided temporary protection. Asylum seekers--people who have applied for asylum or refugee status and who have not yet received a decision or who are registered as asylum seekers--are excluded. Palestinian refugees are people (and their descendants) whose residence was Palestine between June 1946 and May 1948 and who lost their homes and means of livelihood as a result of the 1948 Arab-Israeli conflict. Country of origin generally refers to the nationality or country of citizenship of a claimant."
  • Fertility > Fertility rate, total > Births per woman: Fertility rate, total (births per woman). Total fertility rate represents the number of children that would be born to a woman if she were to live to the end of her childbearing years and bear children in accordance with current age-specific fertility rates.
  • Age structure > 55-64 years: This entry is derived from People > Age structure, which provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group as follows: 0-14 years (children), 15-24 years (early working age), 25-54 years (prime working age), 55-64 years (mature working age), 65 years and over (elderly). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • School life expectancy > Primary to tertiary > Total: This entry is derived from People > School life expectancy > Primary to tertiary , which school life expectancy (SLE) is the total number of years of schooling (primary to tertiary) that a child can expect to receive, assuming that the probability of his or her being enrolled in school at any particular future age is equal to the current enrollment ratio at that age.Caution must be maintained when utilizing this indicator in international comparisons. For example, a year or grade completed in one country is not necessarily the same in terms of educational content or quality as a year or grade completed in another country. SLE represents the expected number of years of schooling that will be completed, including years spent repeating one or more grades.
  • Fertility > Birth rate, crude > Per 1,000 people: Birth rate, crude (per 1,000 people). Crude birth rate indicates the number of live births occurring during the year, per 1,000 population estimated at midyear. Subtracting the crude death rate from the crude birth rate provides the rate of natural increase, which is equal to the rate of population change in the absence of migration.
  • Sex ratio > 15-64 years: The number of males for each female one of five age groups - at birth, under 15 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over, and for the total population. Sex ratio at birth has recently emerged as an indicator of certain kinds of sex discrimination in some countries. For instance, high sex ratios at birth in some Asian countries are now attributed to sex-selective abortion and infanticide due to a strong preference for sons. This will affect future marriage patterns and fertility patterns. Eventually it could cause unrest among young adult males who are unable to find partners.
  • Dependency ratios > Total dependency ratio: This entry is derived from People > Dependency ratios, which dependency ratios are a measure of the age structure of a population. They relate the number of individuals that are likely to be economically "dependent" on the support of others. Dependency ratios contrast the ratio of youths (ages 0-14) and the elderly (ages 65+) to the number of those in the working-age group (ages 15-64). Changes in the dependency ratio provide an indication of potential social support requirements resulting from changes in population age structures. As fertility levels decline, the dependency ratio initially falls because the proportion of youths decreases while the proportion of the population of working age increases. As fertility levels continue to decline, dependency ratios eventually increase because the proportion of the population of working age starts to decline and the proportion of elderly persons continues to increase.
    total dependency ratio - The total dependency ratio is the ratio of combined youth population (ages 0-14) and elderly population (ages 65+) per 100 people of working age (ages 15-64). A high total dependency ratio indicates that the working-age population and the overall economy face a greater burden to support and provide social services for youth and elderly persons, who are often economically dependent.
    youth dependency ratio - The youth dependency ratio is the ratio of the youth population (ages 0-14) per 100 people of working age (ages 15-64). A high youth dependency ratio indicates that a greater investment needs to be made in schooling and other services for children.
    elderly dependency ratio - The elderly dependency ratio is the ratio of the elderly population (ages 65+) per 100 people of working age (ages 15-64). Increases in the elderly dependency ratio put added pressure on governments to fund pensions and healthcare.
    potential support ratio - The potential support ratio is the number of working-age people (ages 15-64) per one elderly person (ages 65+). As a population ages, the potential support ratio tends to fall, meaning there are fewer potential workers to support the elderly.
  • Population density > People per sq. km of land area: Population density (people per sq. km of land area). Population density is midyear population divided by land area in square kilometers. Population is based on the de facto definition of population, which counts all residents regardless of legal status or citizenship--except for refugees not permanently settled in the country of asylum, who are generally considered part of the population of their country of origin. Land area is a country's total area, excluding area under inland water bodies, national claims to continental shelf, and exclusive economic zones. In most cases the definition of inland water bodies includes major rivers and lakes.
  • Life expectancy at birth > Female: This entry is derived from People > Life expectancy at birth, which contains the average number of years to be lived by a group of people born in the same year, if mortality at each age remains constant in the future. The entry includes total population as well as the male and female components. Life expectancy at birth is also a measure of overall quality of life in a country and summarizes the mortality at all ages. It can also be thought of as indicating the potential return on investment in human capital and is necessary for the calculation of various actuarial measures.
  • Dependency ratios > Potential support ratio: This entry is derived from People > Dependency ratios, which dependency ratios are a measure of the age structure of a population. They relate the number of individuals that are likely to be economically "dependent" on the support of others. Dependency ratios contrast the ratio of youths (ages 0-14) and the elderly (ages 65+) to the number of those in the working-age group (ages 15-64). Changes in the dependency ratio provide an indication of potential social support requirements resulting from changes in population age structures. As fertility levels decline, the dependency ratio initially falls because the proportion of youths decreases while the proportion of the population of working age increases. As fertility levels continue to decline, dependency ratios eventually increase because the proportion of the population of working age starts to decline and the proportion of elderly persons continues to increase.
    total dependency ratio - The total dependency ratio is the ratio of combined youth population (ages 0-14) and elderly population (ages 65+) per 100 people of working age (ages 15-64). A high total dependency ratio indicates that the working-age population and the overall economy face a greater burden to support and provide social services for youth and elderly persons, who are often economically dependent.
    youth dependency ratio - The youth dependency ratio is the ratio of the youth population (ages 0-14) per 100 people of working age (ages 15-64). A high youth dependency ratio indicates that a greater investment needs to be made in schooling and other services for children.
    elderly dependency ratio - The elderly dependency ratio is the ratio of the elderly population (ages 65+) per 100 people of working age (ages 15-64). Increases in the elderly dependency ratio put added pressure on governments to fund pensions and healthcare.
    potential support ratio - The potential support ratio is the number of working-age people (ages 15-64) per one elderly person (ages 65+). As a population ages, the potential support ratio tends to fall, meaning there are fewer potential workers to support the elderly.
  • Urbanization: Estimates and projections of urban and rural populations are made by the Population Division of the United Nations Secretariat and published every two years. These estimates and projections are based on national census or survey data that have been evaluated and, whenever necessary, adjusted for deficiencies and inconsistencies. Urban-rural classification of population in internationally published statistics follows the national census definition, which differs from one country or area to another. National definitions are usually based on criteria that may include any of the following: size of population in a locality, population density, distance between built-up areas, predominant type of economic activity, legal or administrative boundaries and urban characteristics such as specific services and facilities.
  • Dependency ratios > Elderly dependency ratio: This entry is derived from People > Dependency ratios, which dependency ratios are a measure of the age structure of a population. They relate the number of individuals that are likely to be economically "dependent" on the support of others. Dependency ratios contrast the ratio of youths (ages 0-14) and the elderly (ages 65+) to the number of those in the working-age group (ages 15-64). Changes in the dependency ratio provide an indication of potential social support requirements resulting from changes in population age structures. As fertility levels decline, the dependency ratio initially falls because the proportion of youths decreases while the proportion of the population of working age increases. As fertility levels continue to decline, dependency ratios eventually increase because the proportion of the population of working age starts to decline and the proportion of elderly persons continues to increase.
    total dependency ratio - The total dependency ratio is the ratio of combined youth population (ages 0-14) and elderly population (ages 65+) per 100 people of working age (ages 15-64). A high total dependency ratio indicates that the working-age population and the overall economy face a greater burden to support and provide social services for youth and elderly persons, who are often economically dependent.
    youth dependency ratio - The youth dependency ratio is the ratio of the youth population (ages 0-14) per 100 people of working age (ages 15-64). A high youth dependency ratio indicates that a greater investment needs to be made in schooling and other services for children.
    elderly dependency ratio - The elderly dependency ratio is the ratio of the elderly population (ages 65+) per 100 people of working age (ages 15-64). Increases in the elderly dependency ratio put added pressure on governments to fund pensions and healthcare.
    potential support ratio - The potential support ratio is the number of working-age people (ages 15-64) per one elderly person (ages 65+). As a population ages, the potential support ratio tends to fall, meaning there are fewer potential workers to support the elderly.
  • Sex ratio > 65 years and over: The number of males for each female one of five age groups - at birth, under 15 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over, and for the total population. Sex ratio at birth has recently emerged as an indicator of certain kinds of sex discrimination in some countries. For instance, high sex ratios at birth in some Asian countries are now attributed to sex-selective abortion and infanticide due to a strong preference for sons. This will affect future marriage patterns and fertility patterns. Eventually it could cause unrest among young adult males who are unable to find partners.
  • Fertility > Mortality rate, infant > Per 1,000 live births: Mortality rate, infant (per 1,000 live births). Infant mortality rate is the number of infants dying before reaching one year of age, per 1,000 live births in a given year.
  • Population, total: Population, total. Population, total refers to the total population.
  • Life expectancy at birth > Male: This entry is derived from People > Life expectancy at birth, which contains the average number of years to be lived by a group of people born in the same year, if mortality at each age remains constant in the future. The entry includes total population as well as the male and female components. Life expectancy at birth is also a measure of overall quality of life in a country and summarizes the mortality at all ages. It can also be thought of as indicating the potential return on investment in human capital and is necessary for the calculation of various actuarial measures.
  • Net migration: Net migration. Net migration is the net total of migrants during the period, that is, the total number of immigrants less the annual number of emigrants, including both citizens and noncitizens. Data are five-year estimates.
  • Population > CIA Factbook per capita: This entry gives an estimate from the US Bureau of the Census based on statistics from population censuses, vital statistics registration systems, or sample surveys pertaining to the recent past and on assumptions about future trends. The total population presents one overall measure of the potential impact of the country on the world and within its region. Note: starting with the 1993 Factbook, demographic estimates for some countries (mostly African) have explicitly taken into account the effects of the growing impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. These countries are currently: The Bahamas, Benin, Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Burma, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Republic of the Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Fertility > Adolescent fertility rate > Births per 1,000 women ages 15-19: Adolescent fertility rate (births per 1,000 women ages 15-19). Adolescent fertility rate is the number of births per 1,000 women ages 15-19.
  • Rural population per 1000: Rural population is calculated as the difference between the total population and the urban population. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • School life expectancy > Primary to tertiary education > Total: School life expectancy (SLE) is the total number of years of schooling (primary to tertiary) that a child can expect to receive, assuming that the probability of his or her being enrolled in school at any particular future age is equal to the current enrollment ratio at that age.Caution must be maintained when utilizing this indicator in international comparisons. For example, a year or grade completed in one country is not necessarily the same in terms of educational content or quality as a year or grade completed in another country. SLE represents the expected number of years of schooling that will be completed, including years spent repeating one or more grades.
  • Number of infant deaths: Number of infant deaths. Number of infants dying before reaching one year of age.
  • Number of under-five deaths: Number of under-five deaths. Number of children dying before reaching age five.
  • GDP per capita > Current US$: GDP per capita (current US$). GDP per capita is gross domestic product divided by midyear population. GDP is the sum of gross value added by all resident producers in the economy plus any product taxes and minus any subsidies not included in the value of the products. It is calculated without making deductions for depreciation of fabricated assets or for depletion and degradation of natural resources. Data are in current U.S. dollars.
  • Density and urbanisation > Urban population: Urban population refers to people living in urban areas as defined by national statistical offices. It is calculated using World Bank population estimates and urban ratios from the United Nations World Urbanisation Prospects.
  • Infant mortality rate > Female: This entry is derived from People > Infant mortality rate, which gives the number of deaths of infants under one year old in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year; included is the total death rate, and deaths by sex, male and female. This rate is often used as an indicator of the level of health in a country.
  • Age structure > 15-64 years > From total: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Urban population per 1000: Urban population is the midyear population of areas defined as urban in each country and reported to the United Nations. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Age structure > 0-14 years > Males: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Age structure > 65 years and over > Males: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • School life expectancy > Primary to tertiary > Total: School life expectancy (SLE) is the total number of years of schooling (primary to tertiary) that a child can expect to receive, assuming that the probability of his or her being enrolled in school at any particular future age is equal to the current enrollment ratio at that age.Caution must be maintained when utilizing this indicator in international comparisons. For example, a year or grade completed in one country is not necessarily the same in terms of educational content or quality as a year or grade completed in another country. SLE represents the expected number of years of schooling that will be completed, including years spent repeating one or more grades.
  • Literacy > Male: This entry is derived from People > Literacy, which includes a definition of literacy and Census Bureau percentages for the total population, males, and females. There are no universal definitions and standards of literacy. Unless otherwise specified, all rates are based on the most common definition - the ability to read and write at a specified age. Detailing the standards that individual countries use to assess the ability to read and write is beyond the scope of the Factbook. Information on literacy, while not a perfect measure of educational results, is probably the most easily available and valid for international comparisons. Low levels of literacy, and education in general, can impede the economic development of a country in the current rapidly changing, technology-driven world.
  • Infant mortality rate > Male: This entry is derived from People > Infant mortality rate, which gives the number of deaths of infants under one year old in a given year per 1,000 live births in the same year; included is the total death rate, and deaths by sex, male and female. This rate is often used as an indicator of the level of health in a country.
  • Sanitation facility access > Improved > Total: This entry is derived from People > Sanitation facility access > Improved, which provides information about access to improved or unimproved sanitation facilities available to segments of the population of a country. improved sanitation - use of any of the following facilities: flush or pour-flush to a piped sewer system, septic tank or pit latrine; ventilated improved pit (VIP) latrine; pit latrine with slab; or a composting toilet. unimproved sanitation - use of any of the following facilities: flush or pour-flush not piped to a sewer system, septic tank or pit latrine; pit latrine without a slab or open pit; bucket; hanging toilet or hanging latrine; shared facilities of any type; no facilities; or bush or field.
  • Number of infant deaths per 1000: Number of infant deaths. Number of infants dying before reaching one year of age. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Total Population per capita: Total Population, as of April 26, 2005. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Age structure > 0-14 years > Males per 1000: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Age structure > 65 years and over > From total: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Urban population > Per capita: Urban population is the midyear population of areas defined as urban in each country and reported to the United Nations. Per capita figures expressed per 1 population.
  • Mortality rate, adult, male > Per 1,000 male adults: Mortality rate, adult, male (per 1,000 male adults). Adult mortality rate is the probability of dying between the ages of 15 and 60--that is, the probability of a 15-year-old dying before reaching age 60, if subject to current age-specific mortality rates between those ages.
  • School life expectancy > Primary to tertiary education > Male: School life expectancy (SLE) is the total number of years of schooling (primary to tertiary) that a child can expect to receive, assuming that the probability of his or her being enrolled in school at any particular future age is equal to the current enrollment ratio at that age.Caution must be maintained when utilizing this indicator in international comparisons. For example, a year or grade completed in one country is not necessarily the same in terms of educational content or quality as a year or grade completed in another country. SLE represents the expected number of years of schooling that will be completed, including years spent repeating one or more grades.
  • Median age > Male: This entry is the age that divides a population into two numerically equal groups; that is, half the people are younger than this age and half are older. It is a single index that summarizes the age distribution of a population. Currently, the median age ranges from a low of about 15 in Uganda and Gaza Strip to 40 or more in several European countries and Japan. See the entry for "Age structure" for the importance of a young versus an older age structure and, by implication, a low versus a higher median age.
  • Density and urbanisation > Rural population: Rural population refers to people living in rural areas as defined by national statistical offices. It is calculated as the difference between total population and urban population.
  • Age structure > 65 years and over > Females: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Age structure > 15-64 years > Females per 1000: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Age structure > 0-14 years > From total: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Age structure > 65 years and over > Females per 1000: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Female population > Age 15-19: Female population - Age 15-19, as of April 26, 2005
  • Median age > Female: This entry is derived from People > Median age, which is the age that divides a population into two numerically equal groups; that is, half the people are younger than this age and half are older. It is a single index that summarizes the age distribution of a population. Currently, the median age ranges from a low of about 15 in Uganda and Gaza Strip to 40 or more in several European countries and Japan. See the entry for "Age structure" for the importance of a young versus an older age structure and, by implication, a low versus a higher median age.
  • Renewable internal freshwater resources per capita > Cubic meters: Renewable internal freshwater resources per capita (cubic meters). Renewable internal freshwater resources flows refer to internal renewable resources (internal river flows and groundwater from rainfall) in the country. Renewable internal freshwater resources per capita are calculated using the World Bank's population estimates.
  • Sanitation facility access > Improved > Urban: This entry is derived from People > Sanitation facility access > Improved, which provides information about access to improved or unimproved sanitation facilities available to segments of the population of a country. improved sanitation - use of any of the following facilities: flush or pour-flush to a piped sewer system, septic tank or pit latrine; ventilated improved pit (VIP) latrine; pit latrine with slab; or a composting toilet. unimproved sanitation - use of any of the following facilities: flush or pour-flush not piped to a sewer system, septic tank or pit latrine; pit latrine without a slab or open pit; bucket; hanging toilet or hanging latrine; shared facilities of any type; no facilities; or bush or field.
  • Migration > Refugee population by country or territory of origin > Per capita: Refugees are people who are recognized as refugees under the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees or its 1967 Protocol, the 1969 Organisation of African Unity Convention Governing the Specific Aspects of Refugee Problems in Africa, people recognized as refugees in accordance with the UNHCR statute, people granted refugee-like humanitarian status, and people provided temporary protection. Asylum seekers--people who have applied for asylum or refugee status and who have not yet received a decision or who are registered as asylum seekers--are excluded. Palestinian refugees are people (and their descendants) whose residence was Palestine between June 1946 and May 1948 and who lost their homes and means of livelihood as a result of the 1948 Arab-Israeli conflict. Country of origin generally refers to the nationality or country of citizenship of a claimant." Per capita figures expressed per 1 million population.
  • Fertility > Mortality rate, under-5, male > Per 1,000 live births: Mortality rate, under-5, male (per 1,000 live births). Mortality rate, under-5, male (per 1,000)
  • International migrant stock, total: International migrant stock, total. International migrant stock is the number of people born in a country other than that in which they live. It also includes refugees. The data used to estimate the international migrant stock at a particular time are obtained mainly from population censuses. The estimates are derived from the data on foreign-born population--people who have residence in one country but were born in another country. When data on the foreign-born population are not available, data on foreign population--that is, people who are citizens of a country other than the country in which they reside--are used as estimates. After the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991 people living in one of the newly independent countries who were born in another were classified as international migrants. Estimates of migrant stock in the newly independent states from 1990 on are based on the 1989 census of the Soviet Union. For countries with information on the international migrant stock for at least two points in time, interpolation or extrapolation was used to estimate the international migrant stock on July 1 of the reference years. For countries with only one observation, estimates for the reference years were derived using rates of change in the migrant stock in the years preceding or following the single observation available. A model was used to estimate migrants for countries that had no data.
  • International migrant stock, total per 1000: International migrant stock, total. International migrant stock is the number of people born in a country other than that in which they live. It also includes refugees. The data used to estimate the international migrant stock at a particular time are obtained mainly from population censuses. The estimates are derived from the data on foreign-born population--people who have residence in one country but were born in another country. When data on the foreign-born population are not available, data on foreign population--that is, people who are citizens of a country other than the country in which they reside--are used as estimates. After the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991 people living in one of the newly independent countries who were born in another were classified as international migrants. Estimates of migrant stock in the newly independent states from 1990 on are based on the 1989 census of the Soviet Union. For countries with information on the international migrant stock for at least two points in time, interpolation or extrapolation was used to estimate the international migrant stock on July 1 of the reference years. For countries with only one observation, estimates for the reference years were derived using rates of change in the migrant stock in the years preceding or following the single observation available. A model was used to estimate migrants for countries that had no data. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Age structure > 0-14 years > Females: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest.
  • Age structure > 65 years and over > Males per 1000: This entry provides the distribution of the population according to age. Information is included by sex and age group (0-14 years, 15-64 years, 65 years and over). The age structure of a population affects a nation's key socioeconomic issues. Countries with young populations (high percentage under age 15) need to invest more in schools, while countries with older populations (high percentage ages 65 and over) need to invest more in the health sector. The age structure can also be used to help predict potential political issues. For example, the rapid growth of a young adult population unable to find employment can lead to unrest. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Total Population > Female: Total Population - Female, as of April 26, 2005
  • Migration > International migrant stock > Total: International migrant stock is the number of people born in a country other than that in which they live. It also includes refugees. The data used to estimate the international migrant stock at a particular time are obtained mainly from population censuses. The estimates are derived from the data on foreign-born population--people who have residence in one country but were born in another country. When data on the foreign-born population are not available, data on foreign population--that is, people who are citizens of a country other than the country in which they reside--are used as estimates. After the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991 people living in one of the newly independent countries who were born in another were classified as international migrants. Estimates of migrant stock in the newly independent states from 1990 on are based on the 1989 census of the Soviet Union. For countries with information on the international migrant stock for at least two points in time, interpolation or extrapolation was used to estimate the international migrant stock on July 1 of the reference years. For countries with only one observation, estimates for the reference years were derived using rates of change in the migrant stock in the years preceding or following the single observation available. A model was used to estimate migrants for countries that had no data."
  • Male population > Age 25-29: Male population - Age 25-29, as of April 26, 2005
  • Female population > Age 10-14 per 1000: Female population - Age 10-14, as of April 26, 2005. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Total population > Age 15-19 per 1000: Total population - Age 15-19, as of April 26, 2005. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Total population > Age 10-14 per 1000: Total population - Age 10-14, as of April 26, 2005. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Female population > Age 15-19 per 1000: Female population - Age 15-19, as of April 26, 2005. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Female population > Age 25-29: Female population - Age 25-29, as of April 26, 2005
  • Female population > Age 30-34 per 1000: Female population - Age 30-34, as of April 26, 2005. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Male population > Age 15-19 per 1000: Male population - Age 15-19, as of April 26, 2005. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Male population > Age 40-44 > % of the total: Male population - Age 40-44 - % of the total, as of April 26, 2005
  • Total population > Age 50-54 > % of the total: Total population - Age 50-54 - % of the total, as of April 26, 2005
  • Female population > Age 30-34 > % of the total: Female population - Age 30-34 - % of the total, as of April 26, 2005
  • Total population > Age 65-69 per 1000: Total population - Age 65-69, as of April 26, 2005. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Male population > Age 20-24 > % of the total: Male population - Age 20-24 - % of the total, as of April 26, 2005
  • Female population > Age 20-24: Female population - Age 20-24, as of April 26, 2005
  • Male population > Age 35-39 > % of the total: Male population - Age 35-39 - % of the total, as of April 26, 2005
  • Male population > Age 15-19 > % of the total: Male population - Age 15-19 - % of the total, as of April 26, 2005
  • Fertility > Mortality rate, under-5, female > Per 1,000 live births: Mortality rate, under-5, female (per 1,000 live births). Mortality rate, under-5, female (per 1,000)
  • Population, female > % of total: Population, female (% of total). Population, female (% of total) is the percentage of the population that is female.
  • Female population > Age 55-59: Female population - Age 55-59, as of April 26, 2005
  • Population > Female > % of total: Female population is the percentage of the population that is female.
  • Male population > Age 80-84 > % of the total: Male population - Age 80-84 - % of the total, as of April 26, 2005
STAT Catholic countries Non-religious countries HISTORY
Age structure > 0-14 years 24.53%
41% more than Non-religious countries
17.45%

Age structure > 65 years and over 9.96%
14.66%
47% more than Catholic countries

Birth rate 17.08 births/1,000 population
46% more than Non-religious countries
11.74 births/1,000 population

Death rate 7.43 deaths/1,000 population
8.26 deaths/1,000 population
11% more than Catholic countries

Death rate, crude > Per 1,000 people 287.68
3 times more than Non-religious countries
99.5

Median age > Total 31.81 years
38.77 years
22% more than Catholic countries

Migration > Net migration > Per capita 8,139.28 per 1 million people
10,175.07 per 1 million people
25% more than Catholic countries

Migration > Net migration rate 0.736 migrant(s)/1,000 populati
1.86 migrant(s)/1,000 populati
3 times more than Catholic countries

Obesity > Adult obesity rate 20.39%
8% more than Non-religious countries
18.85%
Population 956.33 million
1.83 billion
92% more than Catholic countries

Population growth rate 1.04%
99% more than Non-religious countries
0.522%

Sex ratio > At birth 1.06 male(s)/female
1.07 male(s)/female
2% more than Catholic countries

Sex ratio > Total population 0.979 male(s)/female
0.982 male(s)/female
About the same as Catholic countries

Total fertility rate 2.28 children born/woman
38% more than Non-religious countries
1.66 children born/woman

Urban population 631.35 million
816.93 million
29% more than Catholic countries

Life expectancy at birth > Total population 74.74 years
78.74 years
5% more than Catholic countries

Age structure > 15-64 years 65.42%
68.15%
4% more than Catholic countries

Literacy > Total population 91.21%
97.45%
7% more than Catholic countries

Dependency ratios > Youth dependency ratio 42.35%
62% more than Non-religious countries
26.12%
Migration > Net migration 3,159.06
60,505.5
19 times more than Catholic countries

Population > CIA Factbook 841.89 million
1.73 billion
2 times more than Catholic countries

Teenage pregancy rate 51.71
4 times more than Non-religious countries
14.23

Population density 124.76
153.11
23% more than Catholic countries

Sex ratio > Under 15 years 1.04 male(s)/female
1.08 male(s)/female
3% more than Catholic countries

Infant mortality rate > Total 17.82 deaths/1,000 live births
99% more than Non-religious countries
8.98 deaths/1,000 live births

Age structure > 25-54 years 40.64%
42.62%
5% more than Catholic countries
Age structure > 15-24 years 15.98%
18% more than Non-religious countries
13.52%
Rural population 234.59 million
943.17 million
4 times more than Catholic countries

Migration > Refugee population by country or territory of origin 24,519.54
58,729.92
2 times more than Catholic countries

Fertility > Fertility rate, total > Births per woman 2.55
50% more than Non-religious countries
1.7

Age structure > 55-64 years 8.9%
11.75%
32% more than Catholic countries
School life expectancy > Primary to tertiary > Total 13.59 years
15.15 years
11% more than Catholic countries

Fertility > Birth rate, crude > Per 1,000 people 706.81
4 times more than Non-religious countries
165.82

Sex ratio > 15-64 years 0.997
1.01
1% more than Catholic countries

Dependency ratios > Total dependency ratio 56.67%
19% more than Non-religious countries
47.59%
Population density > People per sq. km of land area 129.23 sq. km
665.59 sq. km
5 times more than Catholic countries

Life expectancy at birth > Female 77.61 years
81.56 years
5% more than Catholic countries

Dependency ratios > Potential support ratio 9.62
64% more than Non-religious countries
5.88
Urbanization 63.49
68.33
8% more than Catholic countries
Dependency ratios > Elderly dependency ratio 14.33%
21.46%
50% more than Catholic countries
Sex ratio > 65 years and over 0.762 male(s)/female
0.772 male(s)/female
1% more than Catholic countries

Fertility > Mortality rate, infant > Per 1,000 live births 699.2
7 times more than Non-religious countries
100

Population, total 947.06 million
1.83 billion
93% more than Catholic countries

Life expectancy at birth > Male 72.03 years
76.12 years
6% more than Catholic countries

Net migration -615,761
2.25 million

Population > CIA Factbook per capita 0.99
0.993
About the same as Catholic countries

Fertility > Adolescent fertility rate > Births per 1,000 women ages 15-19 49.06
4 times more than Non-religious countries
13.64

Rural population per 1000 372.52
11% more than Non-religious countries
334.63

School life expectancy > Primary to tertiary education > Total 13.59 years
15.15 years
11% more than Catholic countries
Number of infant deaths 315,000
13% more than Non-religious countries
280,000

Number of under-five deaths 399,000
22% more than Non-religious countries
326,000

GDP per capita > Current US$ $15,709.08
$33,466.14
2 times more than Catholic countries

Density and urbanisation > Urban population 17.3 million
73.49 million
4 times more than Catholic countries

Infant mortality rate > Female 15.76 deaths/1,000 live births
84% more than Non-religious countries
8.55 deaths/1,000 live births

Age structure > 15-64 years > From total 64.33%
68.52%
7% more than Catholic countries

Urban population per 1000 615.12
695.08
13% more than Catholic countries

Age structure > 0-14 years > Males 122.57 million
187.37 million
53% more than Catholic countries

Age structure > 65 years and over > Males 33.63 million
77.89 million
2 times more than Catholic countries

School life expectancy > Primary to tertiary > Total 13.47 years
14.92 years
11% more than Catholic countries

Literacy > Male 92.53%
98.38%
6% more than Catholic countries

Infant mortality rate > Male 19.8 deaths/1,000 live births
2 times more than Non-religious countries
9.38 deaths/1,000 live births

Sanitation facility access > Improved > Total 77.47% of population
88.58% of population
14% more than Catholic countries
Number of infant deaths per 1000 0.477
4 times more than Non-religious countries
0.12

Total Population per capita 0.984
1
2% more than Catholic countries
Age structure > 0-14 years > Males per 1000 133.24
43% more than Non-religious countries
93.42

Age structure > 65 years and over > From total 9.23%
13.26%
44% more than Catholic countries

Urban population > Per capita 0.621 per capita
0.693 per capita
12% more than Catholic countries

Mortality rate, adult, male > Per 1,000 male adults 6,725.52
5 times more than Non-religious countries
1,399.35

School life expectancy > Primary to tertiary education > Male 13.49 years
15 years
11% more than Catholic countries
Median age > Male 30.96 years
37.68 years
22% more than Catholic countries

Density and urbanisation > Rural population 5.99 million
75.91 million
13 times more than Catholic countries

Age structure > 65 years and over > Females 46.04 million
92.49 million
Twice as much as Catholic countries

Age structure > 15-64 years > Females per 1000 319.26
338.8
6% more than Catholic countries

Age structure > 0-14 years > From total 26.44%
45% more than Non-religious countries
18.22%

Age structure > 65 years and over > Females per 1000 52.95
75.29
42% more than Catholic countries

Female population > Age 15-19 37.21 million
75.83 million
2 times more than Catholic countries
Median age > Female 32.67 years
39.85 years
22% more than Catholic countries

Renewable internal freshwater resources per capita > Cubic meters 13,746.13
12% more than Non-religious countries
12,318.64

Sanitation facility access > Improved > Urban 84.56% of population
95.83% of population
13% more than Catholic countries

Migration > Refugee population by country or territory of origin > Per capita 2,982.72 per 1 million people
4 times more than Non-religious countries
825.52 per 1 million people

Fertility > Mortality rate, under-5, male > Per 1,000 live births 984.9
8 times more than Non-religious countries
129.6

International migrant stock, total 31.46 million
2% more than Non-religious countries
30.77 million

International migrant stock, total per 1000 102.67
109.91
7% more than Catholic countries

Age structure > 0-14 years > Females 117.81 million
168.11 million
43% more than Catholic countries

Age structure > 65 years and over > Males per 1000 38.39
56.4
47% more than Catholic countries

Total Population > Female 444.86 million
868.27 million
95% more than Catholic countries
Migration > International migrant stock > Total 687,187.77
2.15 million
3 times more than Catholic countries

Male population > Age 25-29 35.78 million
64.53 million
80% more than Catholic countries
Female population > Age 10-14 per 1000 43.05
28% more than Non-religious countries
33.69
Total population > Age 15-19 per 1000 84.38
15% more than Non-religious countries
73.62
Total population > Age 10-14 per 1000 87.59
26% more than Non-religious countries
69.34
Female population > Age 15-19 per 1000 41.49
16% more than Non-religious countries
35.84
Female population > Age 25-29 35.37 million
61.51 million
74% more than Catholic countries
Female population > Age 30-34 per 1000 35.86
37.25
4% more than Catholic countries
Male population > Age 15-19 per 1000 42.89
14% more than Non-religious countries
37.78
Male population > Age 40-44 > % of the total 3.35
3.83
14% more than Catholic countries
Total population > Age 50-54 > % of the total 5.06
6.33
25% more than Catholic countries
Female population > Age 30-34 > % of the total 3.65
3.72
2% more than Catholic countries
Total population > Age 65-69 per 1000 28
38.36
37% more than Catholic countries
Male population > Age 20-24 > % of the total 4.08
10% more than Non-religious countries
3.69
Female population > Age 20-24 36.26 million
68.04 million
88% more than Catholic countries
Male population > Age 35-39 > % of the total 3.59
3.86
8% more than Catholic countries
Male population > Age 15-19 > % of the total 4.37
16% more than Non-religious countries
3.77
Fertility > Mortality rate, under-5, female > Per 1,000 live births 825.8
8 times more than Non-religious countries
106.7

Population, female > % of total 50.56%
50.72%
About the same as Catholic countries

Female population > Age 55-59 19.33 million
43.7 million
2 times more than Catholic countries
Population > Female > % of total 50.6%
50.72%
About the same as Catholic countries

Male population > Age 80-84 > % of the total 0.536
0.765
43% more than Catholic countries

SOURCES: CIA World Factbook, 28 July 2005; CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; CIA World Factbooks 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013; United Nations Population Division, World Population Prospects 2008.; All CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 18 December 2008; World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; World Development Indicators database; United Nations Population Division, World Population Prospects.; Food and Agriculture Organisation and World Bank population estimates.; United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), Statistical Yearbook and data files, complemented by statistics on Palestinian refugees under the mandate of the UNRWA as published on its website. Data from UNHCR are available online at: www.unhcr.org/statistics/populationdatabase.; (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Repot (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database; Food and Agriculture Organization; Population Division of the United Nations Secretariat, World Urbanization Prospects: The 2001 Revision, Data Tables and Highlights (ESA/P/WP.173, 20 March 2002); Estimates developed by the UN Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation (UNICEF, WHO, World Bank, UN DESA Population Division) at www.childmortality.org.; (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; All CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 18 December 2008. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; World Development Indicators database. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; CIA World Factbook 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013; World Bank national accounts data; World Bank Staff estimates based on United Nations, World Urbanisation Prospects.; Estimates developed by the UN Inter-agency Group for Child Mortality Estimation (UNICEF, WHO, World Bank, UN DESA Population Division) at www.childmortality.org. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division, International Programs Center Spanish Statistical Institute. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects. New York, United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs (advanced Excel tables). Available at http://esa.un.org/wpp/unpp/panel_population.htm, (2) University of California, Berkeley, and Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research. Human Mortality Database. [ www.mortality.org or www.humanmortality.de].; The data on urban population shares used to estimate rural population come from the United Nations, World Urbanisation Prospects. Total population figures are World Bank estimates.; U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division, International Programs Center; Food and Agriculture Organization; United Nations Population Division, Trends in Total Migrant Stock: 2008 Revision.; United Nations Population Division, Trends in Total Migrant Stock: 2008 Revision. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division, International Programs Center Spanish Statistical Institute; U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division, International Programs Center. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; The United Nations Population Division's World Population Prospects.

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