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Russia

Russia Military Stats

chris.lockyer781

Author: chris.lockyer781

The dissolution of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics or Soviet Union did not prevent political leaders to unify the Soviet Armed Forces. Defence Minister Yevgeny Shaposhnikov, the last defence minister of the Soviet Union, was designated commander of the Commonwealth of Independent States in 1991. The Armed Forces of the Russian Federation took the place of the Soviet Armed Forces. It was placed under the control of the Russian Defence Ministry which was created by Boris Yeltsin in 1992.

As of 2010, the Russian Armed Forces consisted of more than 1 million active troops and over 2 million reserves and former conscripts. Before the end of 2013, the Russian military reached roughly 80 percent of the compulsory manpower. Russia supposedly allocated just about $72 billion on weaponry in 2011. In fact, the Russian government is looking forward to step up military spending until the end of 2014.

Organisation

The Russian Federation’s Ministry of Defence sits as the administrative body of the Armed Forces. During the USSR’s tenure, it was the General Staff which supervised the Russian military organization. The role of the General Staff has been relegated to that of being strategic planner for the department. The Russian armed forces are composed of the ground forces, navy and air force. Independent arms of service include the airborne troops, strategic missile command and aerospace defence forces. Meanwhile, the Air Defence Troops, which used to be the Soviet Air Defence Forces, were integrated into the Air Force in 1998.

In 2010, ground forces including the Navy and Air Force were spread out among the Western, Eastern, Southern, and Central Military Districts. Said districts also make up four Joint Strategic Commands. The Navy is comprised of one flotilla and four fleets which are the Northern, Baltic, Black Sea, Pacific, and Caspian Flotilla.

Young men with ages from 18 to 27 are recruited into the armed forces by way of conscription for a term of one year service. The Armed Forces is a combination of contract and conscript forces. A reserve force is ready to reinforce permanent readiness forces if these are not capable of suppressing an armed conflict. In 2003, the Russian parliament approved a law that would have allowed the armed forces to use the services of foreign nationals (contract basis) by offering them Russian citizenship after several years of service. However, until 2010, foreigners could only serve in the military after securing Russian passports.

Defence spending continues to increase after it was announced that in 2005, military expenses reached $32.4 billion. According to approximation, overall Russian defence expenditure is now second to the United States. Former Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin declared four years ago that the defence budget was expected to go beyond $50 billion annually.

Key Reforms

The new defence minister (Anatoliy Serdyukov), who took over from Yevgeny Shaposhnikov, declared a massive structural reorganisation in 2009. One of the major reforms being undertaken is to reduce the strength of the armed forces to one million soldiers until 2016. It will also cut down the number of officers and downgrade the size of the military’s central command. Cadre strength formations will be abolished and restructured into reserve units. The army will be reorganised into a brigade system while the air force will become an air base system. There will be a mode of centralised officer training reducing the 65 military schools into 10 military training centres. Russia is planning to boost annual defence expenditures by 59 percent which is nearly $97 billion in 2015 from merely $61 billion in 2012.

The state defence organization was modified under the term of President Putin. Procurement of contemporary weaponry became the government’s priority in the aftermath of the Chechnya uprising. The two priority directions were assignments for nuclear deterrence forces and acquisition of traditional armaments which included guided missiles. The latest measures geared towards rebuilding of the Armed Forces were brought about by Russia's economic recovery. These were caused by the increase of oil and gas revenues together with the growth of the domestic market.

At present, the military is in the midst of a vital equipment upgrade. The government is expected to allot some $200 billion (what equals to about $400 billion for the development and production of military equipment until 2015. This is covered by the State Armament Program (2007 – 2015). This has been modified recently and extended up to 2020. With more than $650 billion apportioned to purchase of new hardware within the next decade, the objective is to achieve a growth of 30 percent for modern equipment in the army, navy and air force by 2015 and 70% percent by 2020. The Russian Defence Ministry plans to obtain 250 Inter Continental Ballistic Missiles, 800 combat aircraft, 1,200 helicopters, 44 submarines, 36 frigates, 28 corvettes, 18 cruisers, 24 destroyers, and six aircraft carriers.

Definitions

  • Air force > Aircraft carriers > Commissioned:

    Amount of aircraft carriers in full service in each country. These numbers can also be interpreted as the amount of each country's commissioned aircraft carriers.   

  • Air force > Aircraft carriers > Total: Total amount of aircraft carriers possessed by each country. 
  • Air force > Bombers: Number of bomber combat aircrafts.
  • Air force > Combat aircraft: Number of fighter aircrafts (fixed wing aircrafts with combat capability).
  • Air force > Fighters: Number of fighter combat aircrafts.
  • Armed forces growth: Growth in the number of armed forces personnel from 1985 (index = 100) to 2000. 100 means no growth, 50 means it halved and 200 means it doubled.
  • Armed forces personnel: Total armed forces (2000)
  • Armed forces personnel > Total: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organisation, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces."
  • Armed forces personnel per 1000: Total armed forces (2000). Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Arms trade > Arms exports, top countries: Compares the world's largest arms exporters, in millions of US Dollars. Data corresponds to the year 2010, and was compiled by SIPRI (Stockholm International Peace Research Institute), a think tank dedicated to the research of conflict, armaments, arms control and disarmament in the world, with presence in Stockholm, Beijing and Washington DC.
  • Arms trade > Arms exports, top countries per million people: Compares the world's largest arms exporters, in millions of US Dollars. Data corresponds to the year 2010, and was compiled by SIPRI (Stockholm International Peace Research Institute), a think tank dedicated to the research of conflict, armaments, arms control and disarmament in the world, with presence in Stockholm, Beijing and Washington DC. Figures expressed per million people for the same year.
  • Army > Attack helicopters: Number of attack helicopter (includes helicopters that have some attacking capabilities).
  • Army > Main battle tanks: Number of main battle tanks.
  • Battle-related deaths > Number of people: Battle-related deaths (number of people). Battle-related deaths are deaths in battle-related conflicts between warring parties in the conflict dyad (two conflict units that are parties to a conflict). Typically, battle-related deaths occur in warfare involving the armed forces of the warring parties. This includes traditional battlefield fighting, guerrilla activities, and all kinds of bombardments of military units, cities, and villages, etc. The targets are usually the military itself and its installations or state institutions and state representatives, but there is often substantial collateral damage in the form of civilians being killed in crossfire, in indiscriminate bombings, etc. All deaths--military as well as civilian--incurred in such situations, are counted as battle-related deaths.
  • Battle-related deaths > Number of people per million: Battle-related deaths (number of people). Battle-related deaths are deaths in battle-related conflicts between warring parties in the conflict dyad (two conflict units that are parties to a conflict). Typically, battle-related deaths occur in warfare involving the armed forces of the warring parties. This includes traditional battlefield fighting, guerrilla activities, and all kinds of bombardments of military units, cities, and villages, etc. The targets are usually the military itself and its installations or state institutions and state representatives, but there is often substantial collateral damage in the form of civilians being killed in crossfire, in indiscriminate bombings, etc. All deaths--military as well as civilian--incurred in such situations, are counted as battle-related deaths. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Branches: The names of the ground, naval, air, marine, and other defense or security forces
  • Budget: Annual defense budget in billion USD.
  • Conscription: A description of the status of conscription in the nation in 1997.
  • Defence spending > Percent of GDP: Defense expenditure as percentage of GDP. Figures are for the year 2010.
  • Expenditure > Current LCU: Military expenditures data from SIPRI are derived from the NATO definition, which includes all current and capital expenditures on the armed forces, including peacekeeping forces; defense ministries and other government agencies engaged in defense projects; paramilitary forces, if these are judged to be trained and equipped for military operations; and military space activities. Such expenditures include military and civil personnel, including retirement pensions of military personnel and social services for personnel; operation and maintenance; procurement; military research and development; and military aid (in the military expenditures of the donor country). Excluded are civil defense and current expenditures for previous military activities, such as for veterans' benefits, demobilization, conversion, and destruction of weapons. This definition cannot be applied for all countries, however, since that would require much more detailed information than is available about what is included in military budgets and off-budget military expenditure items. (For example, military budgets might or might not cover civil defense, reserves and auxiliary forces, police and paramilitary forces, dual-purpose forces such as military and civilian police, military grants in kind, pensions for military personnel, and social security contributions paid by one part of government to another.)
  • Expenditures > Percent of GDP: Current military expenditures as an estimated percent of gross domestic product (GDP).
  • Global Peace Index: The Global Peace Index is comprised of 22 indicators in the three categories ongoing domestic or international conflicts; societal safety; and security and militarization. A low index value indicates a peaceful and safe country.
  • Highest military decorations > Name: Name of each country’s highest military decoration.
  • Imports > USD: Arms transfers cover the supply of military weapons through sales, aid, gifts, and those made through manufacturing licenses. Data cover major conventional weapons such as aircraft, armored vehicles, artillery, radar systems, missiles, and ships designed for military use. Excluded are transfers of other military equipment such as small arms and light weapons, trucks, small artillery, ammunition, support equipment, technology transfers, and other services."
  • Manpower > Reaching military age annually > Males: The number of draft-age males and females entering the military manpower pool in any given year and is a measure of the availability of draft-age young adults.
  • Manpower reaching military age annually > Males: This entry is derived from Military > Manpower reaching military age annually, which gives the number of males and females entering the military manpower pool (i.e., reaching age 16) in any given year and is a measure of the availability of military-age young adults.
  • Military branches: This entry lists the service branches subordinate to defense ministries or the equivalent (typically ground, naval, air, and marine forces).
  • Military expenditure > Current LCU: Military expenditures data from SIPRI are derived from the NATO definition, which includes all current and capital expenditures on the armed forces, including peacekeeping forces; defense ministries and other government agencies engaged in defense projects; paramilitary forces, if these are judged to be trained and equipped for military operations; and military space activities. Such expenditures include military and civil personnel, including retirement pensions of military personnel and social services for personnel; operation and maintenance; procurement; military research and development; and military aid (in the military expenditures of the donor country). Excluded are civil defense and current expenditures for previous military activities, such as for veterans' benefits, demobilisation, conversion, and destruction of weapons. This definition cannot be applied for all countries, however, since that would require much more detailed information than is available about what is included in military budgets and off-budget military expenditure items. (For example, military budgets might or might not cover civil defense, reserves and auxiliary forces, police and paramilitary forces, dual-purpose forces such as military and civilian police, military grants in kind, pensions for military personnel, and social security contributions paid by one part of government to another.)"
  • Military expenditures: This entry gives spending on defense programs for the most recent year available as a percent of gross domestic product (GDP); the GDP is calculated on an exchange rate basis, i.e., not in terms of purchasing power parity (PPP). For countries with no military forces, this figure can include expenditures on public security and police.
  • Military service age and obligation: This entry gives the required ages for voluntary or conscript military service and the length of service obligation.
  • Navy > Aircraft carriers: Number of aircraft carriers.
  • Navy > Amphibious warfare ships: Number of amphibious warfare ships.
  • Navy > Corvette warships: Number of corvettes.
  • Navy > Cruisers: Number of cruisers.
  • Navy > Destroyers: Number of destroyers.
  • Navy > Frigates: Number of frigates.
  • Navy > Helicopter carriers: Amount of helicopter carriers currently in service.
  • Navy > Nuclear submarines: Number of nuclear submarines.
  • Navy > Submarines: Number of patrol boats (includes minesweepers).
  • Nuclear weapons > Non-Proliferation treaty sign date: Signed.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Nuclear weapons > Nuclear warheads: Total nuclear warheads.
  • Paramilitary personnel: Paramilitary.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Personnel: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organization, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces.
  • Personnel > Per capita: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organization, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Personnel per 1000: Armed forces personnel are active duty military personnel, including paramilitary forces if the training, organization, equipment, and control suggest they may be used to support or replace regular military forces. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Service age and obligation: This entry gives the required ages for voluntary or conscript military service and the length of sevice obligation.
  • WMD > Nuclear: A description of the nation's situation with regards to the possession and manufacture of nuclear weapons
  • War deaths: Battle-related deaths are deaths in battle-related conflicts between warring parties in the conflict dyad (two conflict units that are parties to a conflict). Typically, battle-related deaths occur in warfare involving the armed forces of the warring parties. This includes traditional battlefield fighting, guerrilla activities, and all kinds of bombardments of military units, cities, and villages, etc. The targets are usually the military itself and its installations or state institutions and state representatives, but there is often substantial collateral damage in the form of civilians being killed in crossfire, in indiscriminate bombings, etc. All deaths--military as well as civilian--incurred in such situations, are counted as battle-related deaths."
  • Weapons of mass destruction > Chemical Weapons Convention ratification: Date of ratification of the Chemical Weapon Convention (CWC) of countries who either declared chemical weapon stockpiles, are suspected of secretly stockpiling them, or are running chemical weapons research programs.
  • Weapons of mass destruction > Chemical weapons possession:

    Status of possession of chemical weapons of countries that either declared chemical weapon stockpiles, are suspected of secretly stockpiling them, or are running chemical weapons research programs.

STAT AMOUNT DATE RANK HISTORY
Air force > Aircraft carriers > Commissioned 1 2014 10th out of 13
Air force > Aircraft carriers > Total 7 2014 5th out of 16
Air force > Bombers 195 2013 1st out of 9
Air force > Combat aircraft 1,900 2008 1st out of 1
Air force > Fighters 1,264 2013 2nd out of 9
Armed forces growth -71% 2000 126th out of 132
Armed forces personnel 1.52 million 2000 2nd out of 166
Armed forces personnel > Total 1.48 million 2008 5th out of 160
Armed forces personnel per 1000 10.39 2000 21st out of 166
Arms trade > Arms exports, top countries 8,003 2012 2nd out of 14
Arms trade > Arms exports, top countries per million people 55.76 2012 2nd out of 14
Army > Attack helicopters 1,655 2008 1st out of 1
Army > Main battle tanks 22,710 2008 1st out of 1
Battle-related deaths > Number of people 359 2011 13th out of 31
Battle-related deaths > Number of people per million 2.51 2011 20th out of 31
Branches Ground Forces (SV), Navy (VMF), Air Forces (Voyenno-Vozdushniye Sily, VVS); Airborne Troops (VDV), Strategic Rocket Troops (Raketnyye Voyska Strategicheskogo Naznacheniya, RVSN), and Space Troops (KV) are independent "combat arms," not subordinate to any of the three branches; Russian Ground Forces include the following combat arms: motorized-rifle troops, tank troops, missile and artillery troops, air defense of ground troops 2008
Budget 93.76 US$ BN 2008 1st out of 1
Conscription Conscription exists (AI). 1997
Defence spending > Percent of GDP 3.5% 2008 3rd out of 14
Expenditure > Current LCU 808806000000 2005
Expenditures > Percent of GDP 3.9% 2005 24th out of 153
Global Peace Index 3.06 2013 8th out of 162
Highest military decorations > Name The Gold Star 2014
Imports > USD 100 million 2007 40th out of 100
Manpower > Reaching military age annually > Males 821,103 2008 14th out of 224
Manpower available for military service > Males age 16-49 2013 8th out of 161
Manpower fit for military service > Males age 16-49 2013 11th out of 225
Manpower reaching military age annually > Males 693,843 2012 17th out of 224
Military branches Ground Forces (Sukhoputnyye Voyskia, SV), Navy (Voyenno-Morskoy Flot, VMF), Air Forces (Voyenno-Vozdushniye Sily, VVS); Airborne Troops (Vozdushno-Desantnyye Voyska, VDV), Strategic Rocket Forces (Raketnyye Voyska Strategicheskogo Naznacheniya, RVSN), and Aerospace Defense Troops (Voyska Vozdushno-Kosmicheskoy Oborony or Voyska VKO) are independent "combat arms," not subordinate to any of the three branches; Russian Ground Forces include the following combat arms: motorized-rifle troops, tank troops, missile and artillery troops, air defense of the ground troops 2012
Military expenditure > Current LCU 1.69 trillion 2009 10th out of 116
Military expenditures 3.9% of GDP 2005 6th out of 40
Military service age and obligation 18-27 years of age for compulsory or voluntary military service; males are registered for the draft at 17 years of age; service obligation is 1 year (conscripts can only be sent to combat zones after 6 months of training); reserve obligation to age 50; enrollment in military schools from the age of 16, cadets classified as members of the armed forces 2013
Navy > Aircraft carriers 1 2008 1st out of 1
Navy > Amphibious warfare ships 15 2008 1st out of 1
Navy > Corvette warships 70 2008 1st out of 1
Navy > Cruisers 5 2008 1st out of 1
Navy > Destroyers 14 2008 1st out of 1
Navy > Frigates 5 2008 1st out of 1
Navy > Helicopter carriers 0.0 2014 8th out of 8
Navy > Nuclear submarines 33 2008 1st out of 1
Navy > Submarines 17 2008 1st out of 1
Nuclear weapons > Non-Proliferation treaty sign date 1 Jul 1968 (L, M, W) 2014
Nuclear weapons > Nuclear warheads 8,500 2014 1st out of 9
Paramilitary personnel 449,000 2013 1st out of 1
Personnel 1.45 million 2005 4th out of 160
Personnel > Per capita 10.15 per 1,000 people 2005 28th out of 160
Personnel per 1000 10.14 2005 28th out of 159
Service age and obligation 18-27 years of age for compulsory or voluntary military service; males are registered for the draft at 17 years of age; service obligation - 1 year; reserve obligation to age 50; as of July 2008, a draft military strategy called for the draft to continue up to the year 2030 2008
WMD > Nuclear The Soviet nuclear weapon program began during World War II and culminated in a successful atomic bomb test in 1949. Russia, as the successor of the Soviet Union, is a nuclear weapon state party to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). According to estimates by the Natural Resources Defense Council, by 1991, the Soviet Union had approximately 35,000 weapons in its stockpile, down from a peak in 1986 of approximately 45,000. Russia is estimated to now have around 20,000 nuclear weapons, although total stockpile size is uncertain because there is no accurate count of tactical nuclear weapons. However, in 2002 Russia declared it will eliminate its tactical nuclear weapons by the end of 2004. Under the START I Treaty, the Russian nuclear arsenal has been reduced to approximately 7,000 strategic warheads. The START II Treaty, which was declared non-binding in June 2002, would have reduced this number to between 3,000 and 3,500 strategic nuclear warheads. The Strategic Offensive Reductions Treaty (Treaty of Moscow) requires Russia to reduce the number of deployed strategic warheads to between 1,700 and 2,200 by the end of 2012. Russia inherited a massive nuclear weapons production complex and large stocks of weapons grade fissile material. It is estimated that Russia has between 735 and 1,365 metric tons (t) of weapons grade-equivalent highly enriched uranium (HEU) and between 106 and 156 t of military-use plutonium. 2012
War deaths 339 2008 17th out of 195
Weapons of mass destruction > Chemical Weapons Convention ratification November 5, 1997 2014
Weapons of mass destruction > Chemical weapons possession Known 2014

SOURCES: Wikipedia: List of aircraft carriers in service (List of countries by aircraft carriers); Wikipedia: List of aircraft carriers by country (Number of aircraft carriers by operating nation); Wikipedia: List of countries by level of military equipment (Combat aircraft by country); Wikipedia: List of countries by level of military equipment (List); calculated on the basis of data on armed forces from IISS (International Institute for Strategic Studies). 2001. The Military Balance 2001-2002. Oxford: Oxford University Press; IISS (International Institute for Strategic Studies). 2001. The Military Balance 2001-2002. Oxford: Oxford University Press; International Institute for Strategic Studies, The Military Balance.; IISS (International Institute for Strategic Studies). 2001. The Military Balance 2001-2002. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arms_industry#World.27s_largest_arms_exporters

Stockholm International Peace Research Institute
; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arms_industry#World.27s_largest_arms_exporters

Stockholm International Peace Research Institute
. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; Uppsala Conflict Data Program, http://www.pcr.uu.se/research/UCDP/.; Uppsala Conflict Data Program, http://www.pcr.uu.se/research/UCDP/. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; All CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 18 December 2008; Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Geneva, Switzerland, 1997. Data collected from the nations concerned, unless otherwise indicated. Acronyms: Amnesty International (AI); European Council of Conscripts Organizations (ECCO); Friends World Committee for Consultation (FWCC); International Helsinki Federation for Human Rights (IHFHR); National Interreligious Service Board for Conscientious Objectors (NISBCO); Service, Peace and Justice in Latin America (SERPAJ); War Resisters International (WRI); World Council of Churches (WCC); Stockholm International Peace Research Institute: The SIPRI Military Expenditure Database; World Development Indicators database; http://www.visionofhumanity.org/#/page/indexes/global-peace-index, Global Rankings. Vision of Humanity.; Wikipedia: List of highest military decorations; Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), Yearbook: Armaments, Disarmament and International Security.; CIA World Factbooks 18 December 2003 to 28 March 2011; CIA World Factbooks 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013; Wikipedia: Helicopter carrier (Helicopter carriers by country); Wikipedia: List of parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (Ratified or acceded states); http://www.fas.org/programs/ssp/nukes/nuclearweapons/nukestatus.html, April 2014; Wikipedia: List of countries by number of military and paramilitary personnel (The list); World Development Indicators database. Population figures from World Bank: (1) United Nations Population Division. World Population Prospects, (2) United Nations Statistical Division. Population and Vital Statistics Report (various years), (3) Census reports and other statistical publications from national statistical offices, (4) Eurostat: Demographic Statistics, (5) Secretariat of the Pacific Community: Statistics and Demography Programme, and (6) U.S. Census Bureau: International Database.; The Nuclear Threat Initiative; Uppsala Conflict Data Program, http://www.pcr.uu.se/research/ucdp/.; Wikipedia: Chemical weapon proliferation; Wikipedia: Chemical warfare (Efforts to eradicate chemical weapons)

Citation

"Russia Military Stats", NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/profiles/Russia/Military/All-stats

Did you know

  • Russia ranked first for manpower fit for military service > males age 16-49 amongst Europe in 2013.

2

The dissolution of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics or Soviet Union did not prevent political leaders to unify the Soviet Armed Forces. Defence Minister Yevgeny Shaposhnikov, the last defence minister of the Soviet Union, was designated commander of the Commonwealth of Independent States in 1991. The Armed Forces of the Russian Federation took the place of the Soviet Armed Forces. It was placed under the control of the Russian Defence Ministry which was created by Boris Yeltsin in 1992.

As of 2010, the Russian Armed Forces consisted of more than 1 million active troops and over 2 million reserves and former conscripts. Before the end of 2013, the Russian military reached roughly 80 percent of the compulsory manpower. Russia supposedly allocated just about $72 billion on weaponry in 2011. In fact, the Russian government is looking forward to step up military spending until the end of 2014.

Organisation

The Russian Federation’s Ministry of Defence sits as the administrative body of the Armed Forces. During the USSR’s tenure, it was the General Staff which supervised the Russian military organization. The role of the General Staff has been relegated to that of being strategic planner for the department. The Russian armed forces are composed of the ground forces, navy and air force. Independent arms of service include the airborne troops, strategic missile command and aerospace defence forces. Meanwhile, the Air Defence Troops, which used to be the Soviet Air Defence Forces, were integrated into the Air Force in 1998.

In 2010, ground forces including the Navy and Air Force were spread out among the Western, Eastern, Southern, and Central Military Districts. Said districts also make up four Joint Strategic Commands. The Navy is comprised of one flotilla and four fleets which are the Northern, Baltic, Black Sea, Pacific, and Caspian Flotilla.

Young men with ages from 18 to 27 are recruited into the armed forces by way of conscription for a term of one year service. The Armed Forces is a combination of contract and conscript forces. A reserve force is ready to reinforce permanent readiness forces if these are not capable of suppressing an armed conflict. In 2003, the Russian parliament approved a law that would have allowed the armed forces to use the services of foreign nationals (contract basis) by offering them Russian citizenship after several years of service. However, until 2010, foreigners could only serve in the military after securing Russian passports.

Defence spending continues to increase after it was announced that in 2005, military expenses reached $32.4 billion. According to approximation, overall Russian defence expenditure is now second to the United States. Former Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin declared four years ago that the defence budget was expected to go beyond $50 billion annually.

Key Reforms

The new defence minister (Anatoliy Serdyukov), who took over from Yevgeny Shaposhnikov, declared a massive structural reorganisation in 2009. One of the major reforms being undertaken is to reduce the strength of the armed forces to one million soldiers until 2016. It will also cut down the number of officers and downgrade the size of the military’s central command. Cadre strength formations will be abolished and restructured into reserve units. The army will be reorganised into a brigade system while the air force will become an air base system. There will be a mode of centralised officer training reducing the 65 military schools into 10 military training centres. Russia is planning to boost annual defence expenditures by 59 percent which is nearly $97 billion in 2015 from merely $61 billion in 2012.

The state defence organization was modified under the term of President Putin. Procurement of contemporary weaponry became the government’s priority in the aftermath of the Chechnya uprising. The two priority directions were assignments for nuclear deterrence forces and acquisition of traditional armaments which included guided missiles. The latest measures geared towards rebuilding of the Armed Forces were brought about by Russia's economic recovery. These were caused by the increase of oil and gas revenues together with the growth of the domestic market.

At present, the military is in the midst of a vital equipment upgrade. The government is expected to allot some $200 billion (what equals to about $400 billion for the development and production of military equipment until 2015. This is covered by the State Armament Program (2007 – 2015). This has been modified recently and extended up to 2020. With more than $650 billion apportioned to purchase of new hardware within the next decade, the objective is to achieve a growth of 30 percent for modern equipment in the army, navy and air force by 2015 and 70% percent by 2020. The Russian Defence Ministry plans to obtain 250 Inter Continental Ballistic Missiles, 800 combat aircraft, 1,200 helicopters, 44 submarines, 36 frigates, 28 corvettes, 18 cruisers, 24 destroyers, and six aircraft carriers.

Posted on 09 Apr 2014

chris.lockyer781

chris.lockyer781

396 Stat enthusiast

0

i am so glad to see the return of Russia and i hope the return is sustainable and will have continuity. thank you

Posted on 20 Aug 2010

ibsa ahmed

ibsa ahmed