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Health > Tobacco > Total adult smokers: Countries Compared

Author: Ian Graham <br>Staff Editor

Author: Ian Graham <br>Staff Editor

According to the World Health Organization (see: http://www.who.int/en/), tobacco is the second biggest cause of death in the world and is responsible for about 5 million deaths each year, or one of every 10 adult deaths. Smoking will kill 10 million people per year by 2020 if current smoking patterns continue. Half of the people who smoke today, about 650 million people, will eventually die from tobacco-related illness.

On February 27, 2005, the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) came into force. Countries that signed the treaty are bound by its provisions, which include tobacco advertising bans, price and tax increases, and measures to protect against second-hand smoke. There are 168 signatories to the treaty.

Earlier in the month, Cuba, which is famous for its cigars, instituted new anti-smoking regulations which will ban smoking in many workplaces and the sale of cigarettes near schools.

DEFINITION: Total adults smoking.

CONTENTS

# COUNTRY AMOUNT DATE GRAPH
1 NauruNauru 54% 2005
2 GuineaGuinea 51.7% 2005
3 NamibiaNamibia 50% 2005
4 KenyaKenya 49.4% 2005
5 MongoliaMongolia 46.7% 2005
6 YemenYemen 44.5% 2005
7 TurkeyTurkey 44% 2005
8 RomaniaRomania 43.5% 2005
9 SlovakiaSlovakia 42.6% 2005
10 KiribatiKiribati 42% 2005
11 TuvaluTuvalu 41% 2005
12 LebanonLebanon 40.5% 2005
13 VenezuelaVenezuela 40.5% 2005
14 ArgentinaArgentina 40.4% 2005
15 AlbaniaAlbania 39% 2005
16 BangladeshBangladesh 38.7% 2005
17 NepalNepal 38.5% 2005
18 TongaTonga 38.3% 2005
19 PanamaPanama 38% 2005
20 GreeceGreece 38% 2005
21 KyrgyzstanKyrgyzstan 37.8% 2005
22 GeorgiaGeorgia 37.5% 2005
23 NiueNiue 37.5% 2005
24 CubaCuba 37.2% 2005
25 CambodiaCambodia 37% 2005
26 BeninBenin 37% 2005
27 BulgariaBulgaria 36.5% 2005
28 AndorraAndorra 35.9% 2005
29 CameroonCameroon 35.7% 2005
30 ChinaChina 35.6% 2005
31 HungaryHungary 35.5% 2005
32 UkraineUkraine 35.3% 2005
33 GermanyGermany 35% 2005
34 MexicoMexico 34.8% 2005
35 TunisiaTunisia 34.8% 2005
36 FranceFrance 34.5% 2005
37 UgandaUganda 34.5% 2005
38 PolandPoland 34.5% 2005
39 BrazilBrazil 33.8% 2005
40 SwitzerlandSwitzerland 33.5% 2005
41 KazakhstanKazakhstan 33.5% 2005
42 LithuaniaLithuania 33.4% 2005
43 SpainSpain 33.4% 2005
44 JapanJapan 33.1% 2005
45 NetherlandsNetherlands 33% 2005
46 LuxembourgLuxembourg 33% 2005
47 CroatiaCroatia 33% 2005
48 BurmaBurma 32.9% 2005
NATO countries averageNATO average 32.79% 2005
49 ArmeniaArmenia 32.5% 2005
50 PhilippinesPhilippines 32.4% 2005
51 EstoniaEstonia 32% 2005
52 NorwayNorway 31.5% 2005
53 IrelandIreland 31.5% 2005
54 EcuadorEcuador 31.5% 2005
55 DjiboutiDjibouti 31.1% 2005
56 LatviaLatvia 31% 2005
European Union averageEuropean Union average 30.83% 2005
Emerging markets averageEmerging markets average 30.63% 2005
57 DenmarkDenmark 30.5% 2005
58 BoliviaBolivia 30.4% 2005
Former Soviet republics averageFormer Soviet republics average 30.12% 2005
59 BelarusBelarus 29.8% 2005
Eurozone averageEurozone average 29.77% 2005
High income OECD countries averageHigh income OECD countries average 29.2% 2005
60 UzbekistanUzbekistan 29% 2005
61 JordanJordan 29% 2005
62 PeruPeru 28.6% 2005
63 IsraelIsrael 28.5% 2005
64 BelgiumBelgium 28% 2005
65 GuatemalaGuatemala 27.8% 2005
66 VanuatuVanuatu 27% 2005
67 MalaysiaMalaysia 26.4% 2005
68 MaldivesMaldives 26% 2005
69 SloveniaSlovenia 25.2% 2005
70 AlgeriaAlgeria 25.2% 2005
71 CanadaCanada 25% 2005
72 ItalyItaly 24.9% 2005
73 AustriaAustria 24.5% 2005
74 IcelandIceland 24% 2005
75 MauritiusMauritius 23.9% 2005
76 MaltaMalta 23.9% 2005
77 FinlandFinland 23.5% 2005
78 ThailandThailand 23.4% 2005
79 SamoaSamoa 23.3% 2005
80 CyprusCyprus 23.1% 2005
81 UruguayUruguay 23% 2005
82 PakistanPakistan 22.5% 2005
83 IraqIraq 22.5% 2005
84 ZambiaZambia 22.5% 2005
85 ColombiaColombia 22.3% 2005
86 ChileChile 22.2% 2005
87 SeychellesSeychelles 22% 2005
88 BotswanaBotswana 21% 2005
89 FijiFiji 20.5% 2005
90 LesothoLesotho 19.8% 2005
91 AustraliaAustralia 19.5% 2005
92 SwedenSweden 19% 2005
93 QatarQatar 18.8% 2005
94 PortugalPortugal 18.7% 2005
95 EgyptEgypt 18.3% 2005
96 ZimbabweZimbabwe 17.8% 2005
97 The GambiaThe Gambia 17.8% 2005
98 GhanaGhana 16% 2005
99 IndiaIndia 16% 2005
100 AzerbaijanAzerbaijan 15.7% 2005
101 KuwaitKuwait 15.6% 2005
102 PalauPalau 15.1% 2005
103 SingaporeSingapore 15% 2005
104 ParaguayParaguay 14.8% 2005
105 BahrainBahrain 14.6% 2005
106 JamaicaJamaica 14.6% 2005
107 MalawiMalawi 14.5% 2005
108 TurkmenistanTurkmenistan 14% 2005
109 SwazilandSwaziland 13.4% 2005
110 SudanSudan 12.9% 2005
111 The BahamasThe Bahamas 11.5% 2005
112 BarbadosBarbados 9% 2005
113 NigeriaNigeria 8.6% 2005
114 OmanOman 8.5% 2005
115 RwandaRwanda 5.5% 2005
116 SenegalSenegal 4.6% 2005
117 EthiopiaEthiopia 0.0 2005
118 IndonesiaIndonesia 0.0 2005
119 MoroccoMorocco 0.0 2005
120 HaitiHaiti 0.0 2005
121 HondurasHonduras 0.0 2005

Citation

"All countries compared for Health > Tobacco > Total adult smokers", World Health Organization2005. Aggregates compiled by NationMaster. Retrieved from http://www.nationmaster.com/country-info/stats/Health/Tobacco/Total-adult-smokers

Health > Tobacco > Total adult smokers: Countries Compared Map

NationMaster

0

According to the World Health Organization (see: http://www.who.int/en/), tobacco is the second biggest cause of death in the world and is responsible for about 5 million deaths each year, or one of every 10 adult deaths. Smoking will kill 10 million people per year by 2020 if current smoking patterns continue. Half of the people who smoke today, about 650 million people, will eventually die from tobacco-related illness.

On February 27, 2005, the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) came into force. Countries that signed the treaty are bound by its provisions, which include tobacco advertising bans, price and tax increases, and measures to protect against second-hand smoke. There are 168 signatories to the treaty.

Earlier in the month, Cuba, which is famous for its cigars, instituted new anti-smoking regulations which will ban smoking in many workplaces and the sale of cigarettes near schools.

Posted on 02 Mar 2005

Ian Graham <br>Staff Editor

Ian Graham <br>Staff Editor

0

My whole family has died from smokerelated diseases. Nobody got much older than 50 y.o. And who really wants to become 100 years anyway. It's not enough jobs and resources for all of us. In my mind it makes perfect sense to wanna commit a slow suicide. The world's not that great anyway. But I really think cigaretterelated diseases should not be treated by any public funded health service. If you are as suicidal as me, you should have the decency to die without costing others lots of money.

Posted on 08 Jun 2011

Fred

Fred

0

Hi Liz!
Click countries and You get alphabetical order.

Posted on 09 Apr 2010

Poso

Poso

0

Clikc ctrl + F and then You can search a certain country.

Posted on 09 Apr 2010

Poso

Poso

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