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Environment Stats: compare key data on Cuba & United States

Definitions

  • Adjusted net national income > Constant 2000 US$: Adjusted net national income (constant 2000 US$). Adjusted net national income is GNI minus consumption of fixed capital and natural resources depletion.
  • Biodiversity > Mammal species, threatened: Mammal species, threatened. Mammal species are mammals excluding whales and porpoises. Threatened species are the number of species classified by the IUCN as endangered, vulnerable, rare, indeterminate, out of danger, or insufficiently known.
  • CFC > Consumption: CFC consumption
    Units: Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP) Tons (Metric Tons x ODP)
    Units: The indicator was obtained by multiplying the Total CFCs emissions (metric tons per ozone depletion potential) with the Per capita CFCs emissions (obtained by dividing the total CFCs emissions by the population in 1997). In calculating the ESI, the base-10 logarithm of this variable was used.
  • CO2 Emissions per 1000: CO2: Total Emissions (excluding land-use) Units: thousand metric tonnes of carbon dioxide. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Climate change > CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production, total > Million metric tons: CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production, total (million metric tons). CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production is the sum of three IEA categories of CO2 emissions: (1) Main Activity Producer Electricity and Heat which contains the sum of emissions from main activity producer electricity generation, combined heat and power generation and heat plants. Main activity producers (formerly known as public utilities) are defined as those undertakings whose primary activity is to supply the public. They may be publicly or privately owned. This corresponds to IPCC Source/Sink Category 1 A 1 a. For the CO2 emissions from fuel combustion (summary) file, emissions from own on-site use of fuel in power plants (EPOWERPLT) are also included. (2) Unallocated Autoproducers which contains the emissions from the generation of electricity and/or heat by autoproducers. Autoproducers are defined as undertakings that generate electricity and/or heat, wholly or partly for their own use as an activity which supports their primary activity. They may be privately or publicly owned. In the 1996 IPCC Guidelines, these emissions would normally be distributed between industry, transport and "other" sectors. (3) Other Energy Industries contains emissions from fuel combusted in petroleum refineries, for the manufacture of solid fuels, coal mining, oil and gas extraction and other energy-producing industries. This corresponds to the IPCC Source/Sink Categories 1 A 1 b and 1 A 1 c. According to the 1996 IPCC Guidelines, emissions from coke inputs to blast furnaces can either be counted here or in the Industrial Processes source/sink category. Within detailed sectoral calculations, certain non-energy processes can be distinguished. In the reduction of iron in a blast furnace through the combustion of coke, the primary purpose of the coke oxidation is to produce pig iron and the emissions can be considered as an industrial process. Care must be taken not to double count these emissions in both Energy and Industrial Processes. In the IEA estimations, these emissions have been included in this category.
  • Climate change > CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production, total > Million metric tons per million: CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production, total (million metric tons). CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production is the sum of three IEA categories of CO2 emissions: (1) Main Activity Producer Electricity and Heat which contains the sum of emissions from main activity producer electricity generation, combined heat and power generation and heat plants. Main activity producers (formerly known as public utilities) are defined as those undertakings whose primary activity is to supply the public. They may be publicly or privately owned. This corresponds to IPCC Source/Sink Category 1 A 1 a. For the CO2 emissions from fuel combustion (summary) file, emissions from own on-site use of fuel in power plants (EPOWERPLT) are also included. (2) Unallocated Autoproducers which contains the emissions from the generation of electricity and/or heat by autoproducers. Autoproducers are defined as undertakings that generate electricity and/or heat, wholly or partly for their own use as an activity which supports their primary activity. They may be privately or publicly owned. In the 1996 IPCC Guidelines, these emissions would normally be distributed between industry, transport and "other" sectors. (3) Other Energy Industries contains emissions from fuel combusted in petroleum refineries, for the manufacture of solid fuels, coal mining, oil and gas extraction and other energy-producing industries. This corresponds to the IPCC Source/Sink Categories 1 A 1 b and 1 A 1 c. According to the 1996 IPCC Guidelines, emissions from coke inputs to blast furnaces can either be counted here or in the Industrial Processes source/sink category. Within detailed sectoral calculations, certain non-energy processes can be distinguished. In the reduction of iron in a blast furnace through the combustion of coke, the primary purpose of the coke oxidation is to produce pig iron and the emissions can be considered as an industrial process. Care must be taken not to double count these emissions in both Energy and Industrial Processes. In the IEA estimations, these emissions have been included in this category. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Current issues: This entry lists the most pressing and important environmental problems. The following terms and abbreviations are used throughout the entry:
  • Ecological footprint: Ecological footprint per capita
    Units: Hectares per Person
  • Endangered species > Mammal species > Number: Mammal species are mammals excluding whales and porpoises. Threatened species are the number of species classified by the IUCN as endangered, vulnerable, rare, indeterminate, out of danger, or insufficiently known."
  • Forest area > Sq. km > Per capita: Forest area is land under natural or planted stands of trees, whether productive or not. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Marine fish catch: Total marine fish catch
    Units: Metric Tons
  • Marine fish catch per 1000: Total marine fish catch
    Units: Metric Tons. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Proportion of land area under protection: Terrestrial areas protected to total surface area, percentage.
  • Waste > Local garbage collected: Municipal waste collected.
  • Water > Severe water stress: Percent of country's territory under severe water stress
    Units: Percent of Land Area
    Units: This data is derived from the WaterGap 2.1 gridded hydrological model developed by the Center for Environmental Systems Research, University of Kassel, Germany. The modellers derived, for each country, grid cell by grid cell estimates of whether the water consumption exceeds 40 percent of the water available in that particular grid cell. These were then converted to land area equivalents in order to calculate the percentage of the territory under severe water stress.
  • CO2 emissions > Kt: Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring.
  • Water > Drinking water > Population with improved drinking water sources > Urban and rural: Proportion of the population using improved drinking water sources, total.
  • Emissions > CO2 emissions > Metric tons per capita: Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring."
  • Climate change > CO2 emissions > Metric tons per capita: CO2 emissions (metric tons per capita). Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring.
  • Biodiversity > Bird species, threatened: Bird species, threatened. Birds are listed for countries included within their breeding or wintering ranges. Threatened species are the number of species classified by the IUCN as endangered, vulnerable, rare, indeterminate, out of danger, or insufficiently known.
  • Carbon efficiency: Carbon economic efficiency (CO2 emissions per dollar GDP)
    Units: Metric Tons/US Dollar GDP
  • CO2 emissions > Kt per 1000: Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Endangered species > Bird species: Birds are listed for countries included within their breeding or wintering ranges. Threatened species are the number of species classified by the IUCN as endangered, vulnerable, rare, indeterminate, out of danger, or insufficiently known."
  • Adjusted net national income > Constant 2000 US$ per capita: Adjusted net national income (constant 2000 US$). Adjusted net national income is GNI minus consumption of fixed capital and natural resources depletion. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • SO2 emissions per populated area: SO2 emissions per populated land area
    Units: 1000 Metric Tons/Sq. Km. of Populated Land Area
    Units: We obtained the total emissions for each country by summarizing emissions data, originally available as a grid map with 1 degree x 1 degree cells. Air pollution is generally greatest in densely populated areas. To take this into account, we used the Gridded Population of the World dataset available from CIESIN and calculated the total land area in each country inhabited with a population density of greater than 5 persons per sq. km. We then used this land area as a denominator for the emissions data.
  • Waste > Hazardous waste created: Annual generation of hazardous waste (as defined by the Basel Convention).
  • Waste > Local garbage collected per thousand people: Municipal waste collected. Figures expressed per thousand people for the same year.
  • Biodiversity > Fish species, threatened: Fish species, threatened. Fish species are based on Froese, R. and Pauly, D. (eds). 2008. Threatened species are the number of species classified by the IUCN as endangered, vulnerable, rare, indeterminate, out of danger, or insufficiently known.
  • Climate change > CO2 emissions > Kt: CO2 emissions (kt). Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring.
  • CO2 emissions > Kt > Per capita: Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring. Per capita figures expressed per 1,000 population.
  • Endangered species > Fish species > Number: Fish species are based on Froese, R. and Pauly, D. (eds). 2008. Threatened species are the number of species classified by the IUCN as endangered, vulnerable, rare, indeterminate, out of danger, or insufficiently known."
  • Water > Percent of water resources used: Proportion of total water resources used, percentage.
  • Endangered species > Higher plant species > Number: Higher plants are native vascular plant species. Threatened species are the number of species classified by the IUCN as endangered, vulnerable, rare, indeterminate, out of danger, or insufficiently known."
  • Pollution > Ozone depleting substance consumption: Consumption of all Ozone-Depleting Substances in ODP metric tons.
  • NOx emissions per populated area: NOx emissions per populated land area
    Units: 1000 Metric Tons/Sq. Km. of Populated Land Area
    Units: We obtained the total emissions for each country by summarizing emissions data, originally available as a grid map with 1 degree x 1 degree cells. Air pollution is generally greatest in densely populated areas. To take this into account, we used the Gridded Population of the World dataset available from CIESIN and calculated the total land area in each country inhabited with a population density of greater than 5 persons per sq. km. We then used this land area as a denominator for the emissions data.
  • Water > Dissolved oxygen concentration: Dissolved oxygen concentration
    Units: Milligrams/Liter
    Units: The country values represent averages of the station-level values for the three year time period 1994-96, exceptwhere data were only available for an earlier time period (1988-1993). The number of stations per country varies depending on country size; number of bodies of water; and level of participation in the GEMS monitoring system. The data from "The Wellbeing of Nations" included a smaller subset of stations representing outfalls of major watersheds. An analysis of a sample of countries with numerous stations found that the data for stations in the subset is broadly comparable to the data for all GEMS stations in those countries.
  • Climate change > CO2 emissions > Kt per 1000: CO2 emissions (kt). Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Forest area > Sq. km: Forest area is land under natural or planted stands of trees, whether productive or not.
  • Climate change > CO2 emissions > Kg per 2000 US$ of GDP: CO2 emissions (kg per 2000 US$ of GDP). Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring.
  • Sanitation > Population with improved sanitation > Urban and rural: Proportion of the population using improved sanitation facilities, total.
  • Emissions > CO2 emissions > Kt: Carbon dioxide emissions are those stemming from the burning of fossil fuels and the manufacture of cement. They include carbon dioxide produced during consumption of solid, liquid, and gas fuels and gas flaring."
  • Pollution > Ozone depleting substance consumption per million people: Consumption of all Ozone-Depleting Substances in ODP metric tons. Figures expressed per million people for the same year.
  • Water > Availability: Water availability per capita (1961-1990 (avg.))
    Units: Thousands Cubic Meters/Person
    Units: This variable measures internal renewable water (average annual surface runoff and groundwater recharge generated from endogenous precipitation)
  • Water > Drinking water > Population with improved drinking water sources > Rural: Proportion of the population using improved drinking water sources, rural.
  • Biodiversity > Plant species > Higher, threatened: Plant species (higher), threatened. Higher plants are native vascular plant species. Threatened species are the number of species classified by the IUCN as endangered, vulnerable, rare, indeterminate, out of danger, or insufficiently known.
  • Threatened species: Number of Threatened Species (1990-99)
  • Adjusted net national income > Current US$ per capita: Adjusted net national income (current US$). Adjusted net national income is GNI minus consumption of fixed capital and natural resources depletion. Figures expressed per capita for the same year.
  • Waste > Population served by local garbage collection: Total population served by municipal waste collection.
  • Biodiversity > Number: GEF benefits index for biodiversity is a composite index of relative biodiversity potential for each country based on the species represented in each country, their threat status, and the diversity of habitat types in each country. The index has been normalized so that values run from 0 (no biodiversity potential) to 100 (maximum biodiversity potential)."
  • Adjusted net national income > Current US$: Adjusted net national income (current US$). Adjusted net national income is GNI minus consumption of fixed capital and natural resources depletion.
  • CFC > Consumption per 1000: CFC consumption
    Units: Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP) Tons (Metric Tons x ODP)
    Units: The indicator was obtained by multiplying the Total CFCs emissions (metric tons per ozone depletion potential) with the Per capita CFCs emissions (obtained by dividing the total CFCs emissions by the population in 1997). In calculating the ESI, the base-10 logarithm of this variable was used. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Waste > Hazardous waste created per thousand people: Annual generation of hazardous waste (as defined by the Basel Convention). Figures expressed per thousand people for the same year.
  • Protected area: Environmentally protected area (1997)
  • Biodiversity > GEF benefits index for biodiversity > 0 = no biodiversity potential to 100 = maximum: GEF benefits index for biodiversity (0 = no biodiversity potential to 100 = maximum). GEF benefits index for biodiversity is a composite index of relative biodiversity potential for each country based on the species represented in each country, their threat status, and the diversity of habitat types in each country. The index has been normalized so that values run from 0 (no biodiversity potential) to 100 (maximum biodiversity potential).
  • Freshwater > Renewable internal freshwater resources > Total > Billion cubic meters: Renewable internal freshwater resources flows refer to internal renewable resources (internal river flows and groundwater from rainfall) in the country.
  • Acidification: Percentage of country with acidification excedence
    Units: Percent of Land Area
    Units: From a map of acidification excedence, all areas at risk within each country were added together in order to calculate the percentage of the entire country at risk of excedence. See pages 21-22 of the 2001 ESI report for more details on how the acidification excedence map was produced.
  • Emissions > Methane emissions > Kt of CO2 equivalent: Methane emissions are those stemming from human activities such as agriculture and from industrial methane production.
  • Freshwater > Renewable internal freshwater resources per capita > Cubic meters: Renewable internal freshwater resources flows refer to internal renewable resources (internal river flows and groundwater from rainfall) in the country. Renewable internal freshwater resources per capita are calculated using the World Bank's population estimates.
  • Pollution > PM10, country level > Micrograms per cubic meter: PM10, country level (micrograms per cubic meter). Particulate matter concentrations refer to fine suspended particulates less than 10 microns in diameter (PM10) that are capable of penetrating deep into the respiratory tract and causing significant health damage. Data for countries and aggregates for regions and income groups are urban-population weighted PM10 levels in residential areas of cities with more than 100,000 residents. The estimates represent the average annual exposure level of the average urban resident to outdoor particulate matter. The state of a country's technology and pollution controls is an important determinant of particulate matter concentrations.
  • Wetlands of intl importance > Area: Wetlands of international importance 2002
  • Biodiversity and protected areas > Terrestrial protected areas > Number: Terrestrial protected areas are those officially documented by national authorities.
  • Proportion of land and marine area under protection: Terrestrial and marine areas protected to total territorial area, percentage.
  • Endangered species protection: Percent of CITES reporting requirements met
    Units: Percent of Requirements Met
    Units: Countries that have not ratified the CITES convention are recorded as having zero percent of their requirements met.
  • Climate change > CO2 emissions from other sectors, excluding residential buildings and commercial and public services > Million metric tons: CO2 emissions from other sectors, excluding residential buildings and commercial and public services (million metric tons). CO2 emissions from other sectors, less residential buildings and commercial and public services, contains the emissions from commercial/institutional activities, residential, agriculture/forestry, fishing and other emissions not specified elsewhere that are included in the IPCC Source/Sink Categories 1 A 4 and 1 A 5. In the 1996 IPCC Guidelines, the category also includes emissions from autoproducers in the commercial/residential/agricultural sectors that generate electricity and/or heat. The IEA data are not collected in a way that allows the energy consumption to be split by specific end-use and therefore, autoproducers are shown as a separate item (Unallocated Autoproducers).
  • Biodiversity > GEF benefits index for biodiversity > 0 = no biodiversity potential to 100 = maximum per million: GEF benefits index for biodiversity (0 = no biodiversity potential to 100 = maximum). GEF benefits index for biodiversity is a composite index of relative biodiversity potential for each country based on the species represented in each country, their threat status, and the diversity of habitat types in each country. The index has been normalized so that values run from 0 (no biodiversity potential) to 100 (maximum biodiversity potential). Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Sanitation > Population with improved sanitation > Rural: Proportion of the population using improved sanitation facilities, rural.
  • Water > Drinking water > Population with improved drinking water sources > Urban: Proportion of the population using improved drinking water sources, urban.
  • Emissions > Nitrous oxide emissions > Thousand metric tons of CO2 equivalent: Nitrous oxide emissions are emissions from agricultural biomass burning, industrial activities, and livestock management."
  • Wildness: Percent of land area having very low anthropogenic impact
    Units: Percent of Land Area
    Units: Global grids for population (GPW), land use (USGS AVHRR based classification from EROS data center), VMAP roads, VMAP railways, VMAP coastlines, VMAP major rivers and the stable lights data were all scored for "wildness". The scores were aggregated and normalized.
  • Biosphere > Reserves area: Biosphere reserves area 2002.
  • Forest area > Sq. km per 1000: Forest area is land under natural or planted stands of trees, whether productive or not. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Threatened species > Mammal: Number of threatened mammal species (1997)
  • Water > Population supplied by water supply industry: Total population supplied by water supply industry.
  • World Heritage Sites (environmental): Natural sites.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Known mammal species: Known mammal species (1992-2002).
  • Climate change > CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services > Million metric tons: CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services (million metric tons). CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services contains all emissions from fuel combustion in households. This corresponds to IPCC Source/Sink Category 1 A 4 b. Commercial and public services includes emissions from all activities of ISIC Divisions 41, 50-52, 55, 63-67, 70-75, 80, 85, 90-93 and 99.
  • Freshwater > Annual freshwater withdrawals > Total > Billion cubic meters: Annual freshwater withdrawals refer to total water withdrawals, not counting evaporation losses from storage basins. Withdrawals also include water from desalination plants in countries where they are a significant source. Withdrawals can exceed 100 percent of total renewable resources where extraction from nonrenewable aquifers or desalination plants is considerable or where there is significant water reuse. Withdrawals for agriculture and industry are total withdrawals for irrigation and livestock production and for direct industrial use (including withdrawals for cooling thermoelectric plants). Withdrawals for domestic uses include drinking water, municipal use or supply, and use for public services, commercial establishments, and homes. Data are for the most recent year available for 1987-2002."
  • Pollution > Carbon dioxide 1999: 1999 total CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel burning, cement production, and gas flaring. Emissions are expressed in thousand metric tons of carbon (not CO2).
  • Breeding birds threatened: Percentage of breeding birds threatened
    Units: Percent of Breeding Birds
    Units: The number of bird species threatened divided by known bird species in the country, expressed as a percentage.
  • Climate change > CO2 emissions from solid fuel consumption > Kt per 1000: CO2 emissions from solid fuel consumption (kt). Carbon dioxide emissions from solid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of coal as an energy source. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Climate change > CO2 emissions from solid fuel consumption > Kt: CO2 emissions from solid fuel consumption (kt). Carbon dioxide emissions from solid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of coal as an energy source.
  • Climate change > CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption > Kt per 1000: CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption (kt). Carbon dioxide emissions from liquid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of petroleum-derived fuels as an energy source. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Climate change > CO2 emissions from gaseous fuel consumption > Kt: CO2 emissions from gaseous fuel consumption (kt). Carbon dioxide emissions from liquid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of natural gas as an energy source.
  • Climate change > CO2 emissions from gaseous fuel consumption > Kt per 1000: CO2 emissions from gaseous fuel consumption (kt). Carbon dioxide emissions from liquid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of natural gas as an energy source. Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Climate change > Other greenhouse gas emissions, HFC, PFC and SF6 > Thousand metric tons of CO2 equivalent per million: Other greenhouse gas emissions, HFC, PFC and SF6 (thousand metric tons of CO2 equivalent). Other greenhouse gas emissions are by-product emissions of hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Biodiversity and protected areas > Marine protected areas > Number: Marine protected areas are areas of intertidal or subtidal terrain--and overlying water and associated flora and fauna and historical and cultural features--that have been reserved by law or other effective means to protect part or all of the enclosed environment.
  • Sanitation > Population with improved sanitation > Urban: Proportion of the population using improved sanitation facilities, urban.
  • Emissions > Other greenhouse gas emissions > HFC > PFC and SF6 > Thousand metric tons of CO2 equivalent: Other greenhouse gas emissions are by-product emissions of hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride."
  • Urban SO2 concentration: Urban SO2 concentration
    Units: Micrograms/m3
    Units: The values were originally collected at the city level. Each nation varied in terms of the number of cities reported, so this data should be used with some caution. Within each country the values have been normalized by city population for the year 1995, then added together to obtain the total concentration for the given country.
  • Marine areas under protection: Protected marine areas under IUCN management categories I - VI (1992-2003)
  • Water > Population connected to wastewater collecting system: Population connected to wastewater collecting system.
  • Water > Proportion of marine area under protection: Marine areas protected to territorial waters, percentage.
  • Pollution > Carbon dioxide 1999 per 1000: 1999 total CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel burning, cement production, and gas flaring. Emissions are expressed in thousand metric tons of carbon (not CO2). Figures expressed per thousand population for the same year.
  • Freshwater > Withdrawal per million: . Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Emissions > PM10 > Country level > Micrograms per cubic meter: Particulate matter concentrations refer to fine suspended particulates less than 10 microns in diameter (PM10) that are capable of penetrating deep into the respiratory tract and causing significant health damage. Data for countries and aggregates for regions and income groups are urban-population weighted PM10 levels in residential areas of cities with more than 100,000 residents. The estimates represent the average annual exposure level of the average urban resident to outdoor particulate matter. The state of a country's technology and pollution controls is an important determinant of particulate matter concentrations."
  • Known mammal species per million: Known mammal species (1992-2002). Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Wetlands of intl importance > Area per million: Wetlands of international importance 2002. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Areas under protection per million: Protected Areas under IUCN management categories I - VI (1992-2003). Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Water > Salinisation: Electrical conductivity
    Units: Micro-Siemens/Centimeter
    Units: The country values represent averages of the station-level values for the three year time period 1994-96, except where data were only available for an earlier time period (1988-1993). The number of stations per country varies depending on country size; number of water bodies; and level of participation in the GEMS monitoring system.
  • Areas under protection: Protected Areas under IUCN management categories I - VI (1992-2003)
  • Marine areas under protection per million: Protected marine areas under IUCN management categories I - VI (1992-2003). Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Biosphere > Reserves area per million: Biosphere reserves area 2002. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Fertiliser > Consumption: Fertilizer consumption per hectare of arable land
    Units: Hundreds Grams/Hectare of Arable Land
  • Urban NO2 concentration: Urban NO2 concentration
    Units: Micrograms/m3
    Units: The values were originally collected at the city level. Each nation varied in terms of the number of cities reported, so this data should be used with some caution. Within each country the values have been normalized by city population for the year 1995, then added together to obtain the total concentration for the given country.
  • Non-wildness: Percent of land area having very high anthropogenic impact
    Units: Percent of Land Area
    Units: Global grids for population (GPW), land use (USGS AVHRR based classification from EROS data center), VMAP roads, VMAP railways, VMAP coastlines, VMAP major rivers and the stable lights data were all scored for "wildness". The scores were aggregated and normalized.
  • Water pollution > Clay and glass industry > % of total BOD emissions: Industry shares of emissions of organic water pollutants refer to emissions from manufacturing activities as defined by two-digit divisions of the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 2: stone, ceramics, and glass (36). Emissions of organic water pollutants are measured by biochemical oxygen demand, which refers to the amount of oxygen that bacteria in water will consume in breaking down waste. This is a standard water-treatment test for the presence of organic pollutants.
  • Known breeding bird species per million: Known breeding bird mammal species (1992-2002). Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Water pollution > Metal industry > % of total BOD emissions: Industry shares of emissions of organic water pollutants refer to emissions from manufacturing activities as defined by two-digit divisions of the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 2: primary metals (ISIC division 37). Emissions of organic water pollutants are measured by biochemical oxygen demand, which refers to the amount of oxygen that bacteria in water will consume in breaking down waste. This is a standard water-treatment test for the presence of organic pollutants.
  • Emissions > Agricultural methane emissions > % of total: Agricultural methane emissions are emissions from animals, animal waste, rice production, agricultural waste burning (nonenergy, on-site), and savannah burning."
  • Climate change > CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption > Kt: CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption (kt). Carbon dioxide emissions from liquid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of petroleum-derived fuels as an energy source.
  • Forest area > % of land area: Forest area is land under natural or planted stands of trees, whether productive or not.
  • Adjusted savings > Adjusted savings > Particulate emission damage > % of GNI: Particulate emissions damage is calculated as the willingness to pay to avoid mortality attributable to particulate emissions.
  • Climate change > CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services > % of total fuel combustion: CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services (% of total fuel combustion). CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services contains all emissions from fuel combustion in households. This corresponds to IPCC Source/Sink Category 1 A 4 b. Commercial and public services includes emissions from all activities of ISIC Divisions 41, 50-52, 55, 63-67, 70-75, 80, 85, 90-93 and 99.
  • Water pollution > Food industry > % of total BOD emissions: Industry shares of emissions of organic water pollutants refer to emissions from manufacturing activities as defined by two-digit divisions of the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 2: food and beverages (31). Emissions of organic water pollutants are measured by biochemical oxygen demand, which refers to the amount of oxygen that bacteria in water will consume in breaking down waste. This is a standard water-treatment test for the presence of organic pollutants.
  • Adjusted savings > Adjusted savings > Net forest depletion > Current US$: Net forest depletion is calculated as the product of unit resource rents and the excess of roundwood harvest over natural growth.
  • Adjusted savings > Adjusted savings > Energy depletion > Current US$: Energy depletion is equal to the product of unit resource rents and the physical quantities of energy extracted. It covers crude oil, natural gas, and coal."
  • Emissions > Industrial methane emissions > % of total: Industrial methane emissions are emissions from the handling, transmission, and combustion of fossil fuels and biofuels."
  • Emissions > CO2 intensity > Kg per kg of oil equivalent energy use: Carbon dioxide emissions from solid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of coal as an energy source.
  • PM10 > Country level > Micrograms per cubic meter: Particulate matter concentrations refer to fine suspended particulates less than 10 microns in diameter (PM10) that are capable of penetrating deep into the respiratory tract and causing significant health damage. Data for countries and aggregates for regions and income groups are urban-population weighted PM10 levels in residential areas of cities with more than 100,000 residents. The estimates represent the average annual exposure level of the average urban resident to outdoor particulate matter. The state of a countryÂ’s technology and pollution controls is an important determinant of particulate matter concentrations.
  • Natural gas rents > % of GDP: Natural gas rents (% of GDP). Natural gas rents are the difference between the value of natural gas production at world prices and total costs of production.
  • Climate change > GHG net emissions/removals by LUCF > Mt of CO2 equivalent: GHG net emissions/removals by LUCF (Mt of CO2 equivalent). GHG net emissions/removals by LUCF refers to changes in atmospheric levels of all greenhouse gases attributable to forest and land-use change activities, including but not limited to (1) emissions and removals of CO2 from decreases or increases in biomass stocks due to forest management, logging, fuelwood collection, etc.; (2) conversion of existing forests and natural grasslands to other land uses; (3) removal of CO2 from the abandonment of formerly managed lands (e.g. croplands and pastures); and (4) emissions and removals of CO2 in soil associated with land-use change and management. For Annex-I countries under the UNFCCC, these data are drawn from the annual GHG inventories submitted to the UNFCCC by each country; for non-Annex-I countries, data are drawn from the most recently submitted National Communication where available. Because of differences in reporting years and methodologies, these data are not generally considered comparable across countries. Data are in million metric tons.
  • Freshwater > Annual freshwater withdrawals > Domestic > % of total freshwater withdrawal: Annual freshwater withdrawals refer to total water withdrawals, not counting evaporation losses from storage basins. Withdrawals also include water from desalination plants in countries where they are a significant source. Withdrawals can exceed 100 percent of total renewable resources where extraction from nonrenewable aquifers or desalination plants is considerable or where there is significant water reuse. Withdrawals for domestic uses include drinking water, municipal use or supply, and use for public services, commercial establishments, and homes. Data are for the most recent year available for 1987-2002."
  • Adjusted savings > Adjusted savings > Mineral depletion > Current US$: Mineral depletion is equal to the product of unit resource rents and the physical quantities of minerals extracted. It refers to bauxite, copper, iron, lead, nickel, phosphate, tin, zinc, gold, and silver."
  • Freshwater > Annual freshwater withdrawals > Total > % of internal resources: Annual freshwater withdrawals refer to total water withdrawals, not counting evaporation losses from storage basins. Withdrawals also include water from desalination plants in countries where they are a significant source. Withdrawals can exceed 100 percent of total renewable resources where extraction from nonrenewable aquifers or desalination plants is considerable or where there is significant water reuse. Withdrawals for agriculture and industry are total withdrawals for irrigation and livestock production and for direct industrial use (including withdrawals for cooling thermoelectric plants). Withdrawals for domestic uses include drinking water, municipal use or supply, and use for public services, commercial establishments, and homes. Data are for the most recent year available for 1987-2002."
  • Adjusted net national income > Constant 2000 US$, % of GDP: Adjusted net national income (constant 2000 US$). Adjusted net national income is GNI minus consumption of fixed capital and natural resources depletion. Figures expressed as a proportion of GDP for the same year
  • Adjusted net national income > Current US$, % of GDP: Adjusted net national income (current US$). Adjusted net national income is GNI minus consumption of fixed capital and natural resources depletion. Figures expressed as a proportion of GDP for the same year
  • Water pollution > Wood industry > % of total BOD emissions: Industry shares of emissions of organic water pollutants refer to emissions from manufacturing activities as defined by two-digit divisions of the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 2: wood (33). Emissions of organic water pollutants are measured by biochemical oxygen demand, which refers to the amount of oxygen that bacteria in water will consume in breaking down waste. This is a standard water-treatment test for the presence of organic pollutants.
  • Biodiversity and protected areas > Terrestrial protected areas > % of total surface area: Terrestrial protected areas are those officially documented by national authorities.
  • Water pollution > Other industry > % of total BOD emissions: Industry shares of emissions of organic water pollutants refer to emissions from manufacturing activities as defined by two-digit divisions of the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 2: other (38 and 39). Emissions of organic water pollutants are measured by biochemical oxygen demand, which refers to the amount of oxygen that bacteria in water will consume in breaking down waste. This is a standard water-treatment test for the presence of organic pollutants.
  • Biodiversity and protected areas > Marine protected areas > % of total surface area: Marine protected areas are areas of intertidal or subtidal terrain--and overlying water and associated flora and fauna and historical and cultural features--that have been reserved by law or other effective means to protect part or all of the enclosed environment.
  • Freshwater > Annual freshwater withdrawals > Industry > % of total freshwater withdrawal: Annual freshwater withdrawals refer to total water withdrawals, not counting evaporation losses from storage basins. Withdrawals also include water from desalination plants in countries where they are a significant source. Withdrawals can exceed 100 percent of total renewable resources where extraction from nonrenewable aquifers or desalination plants is considerable or where there is significant water reuse. Withdrawals for industry are total withdrawals for direct industrial use (including withdrawals for cooling thermoelectric plants). Data are for the most recent year available for 1987-2002."
  • Water > Phosphorus concentration: Phosphorus concentration
    Units: Milligrams/Liter
    Units: The country values represent averages of the station-level values for the three year time period 1994-96, except where data were only available for an earlier time period (1988-1993). The number of stations per country varies depending on country size; number of bodies of water; and level of participation in the GEMS monitoring system. The data from "The Wellbeing of Nations" included a smaller subset of stations representing outfalls of major watersheds. An analysis of a sample of countries with numerous stations found that the data for stations in the subset is broadly comparable to the data for all GEMS stations in those countries.
  • Known breeding bird species: Known breeding bird mammal species (1992-2002).
  • Water pollution > Textile industry > % of total BOD emissions: Industry shares of emissions of organic water pollutants refer to emissions from manufacturing activities as defined by two-digit divisions of the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 2: textiles (32). Emissions of organic water pollutants are measured by biochemical oxygen demand, which refers to the amount of oxygen that bacteria in water will consume in breaking down waste. This is a standard water-treatment test for the presence of organic pollutants.
  • Total natural resources rents > % of GDP: Total natural resources rents (% of GDP). Total natural resources rents are the sum of oil rents, natural gas rents, coal rents (hard and soft), mineral rents, and forest rents.
  • Pollution > Greenhouse gas emissions > United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change sign date: Signature.
  • Oil rents > % of GDP: Oil rents (% of GDP). Oil rents are the difference between the value of crude oil production at world prices and total costs of production.
  • Water pollution > Chemical industry > % of total BOD emissions: Industry shares of emissions of organic water pollutants refer to emissions from manufacturing activities as defined by two-digit divisions of the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 2: chemicals (35). Emissions of organic water pollutants are measured by biochemical oxygen demand, which refers to the amount of oxygen that bacteria in water will consume in breaking down waste. This is a standard water-treatment test for the presence of organic pollutants.
  • Freshwater > Annual freshwater withdrawals > Agriculture > % of total freshwater withdrawal: Annual freshwater withdrawals refer to total water withdrawals, not counting evaporation losses from storage basins. Withdrawals also include water from desalination plants in countries where they are a significant source. Withdrawals can exceed 100 percent of total renewable resources where extraction from nonrenewable aquifers or desalination plants is considerable or where there is significant water reuse. Withdrawals for agriculture are total withdrawals for irrigation and livestock production. Data are for the most recent year available for 1987-2002."
  • Organic water pollutant > BOD emissions > Kg per day per worker: Emissions per worker are total emissions of organic water pollutants divided by the number of industrial workers. Organic water pollutants are measured by biochemical oxygen demand, which refers to the amount of oxygen that bacteria in water will consume in breaking down waste. This is a standard water-treatment test for the presence of organic pollutants.
  • International agreements > Signed but not ratified: The various international environmental agreements which a country has signed but not ratified. Agreements are listed in alphabetical order by the abbreviated form of the full name.
  • Water > Suspended solids: Suspended solids
    Units: Natural Log of Milligrams/Liter
    Units: The country values represent averages of the station-level values for the three year time period 1994-96, exceptwhere data were only available for an earlier time period (1988-1993). The number of stations per country varies depending on country size; number of bodies of water; and level of participation in the GEMS monitoring system. Data from "The Wellbeing of Nations" included a smaller subset of stations representing outfalls of majorwatersheds. An analysis of a sample of countries with numerous stations found that the data for stations in the subset is broadly comparable to the data for all GEMS stations in those countries. The data in this table was transformed using the natural logarithm.
  • Climate change > CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption > % of total: CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption (% of total). Carbon dioxide emissions from liquid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of petroleum-derived fuels as an energy source.
  • Climate change > CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services > Million metric tons per million: CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services (million metric tons). CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services contains all emissions from fuel combustion in households. This corresponds to IPCC Source/Sink Category 1 A 4 b. Commercial and public services includes emissions from all activities of ISIC Divisions 41, 50-52, 55, 63-67, 70-75, 80, 85, 90-93 and 99. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • CO2 Emissions: CO2: Total Emissions (excluding land-use) Units: thousand metric tonnes of carbon dioxide
  • Climate change > GHG net emissions/removals by LUCF > Mt of CO2 equivalent per million: GHG net emissions/removals by LUCF (Mt of CO2 equivalent). GHG net emissions/removals by LUCF refers to changes in atmospheric levels of all greenhouse gases attributable to forest and land-use change activities, including but not limited to (1) emissions and removals of CO2 from decreases or increases in biomass stocks due to forest management, logging, fuelwood collection, etc.; (2) conversion of existing forests and natural grasslands to other land uses; (3) removal of CO2 from the abandonment of formerly managed lands (e.g. croplands and pastures); and (4) emissions and removals of CO2 in soil associated with land-use change and management. For Annex-I countries under the UNFCCC, these data are drawn from the annual GHG inventories submitted to the UNFCCC by each country; for non-Annex-I countries, data are drawn from the most recently submitted National Communication where available. Because of differences in reporting years and methodologies, these data are not generally considered comparable across countries. Data are in million metric tons. Figures expressed per million population for the same year.
  • Adjusted savings > Particulate emission damage > % of GNI: Particulate emissions damage is calculated as the willingness to pay to avoid mortality attributable to particulate emissions.
  • Climate change > CO2 emissions from gaseous fuel consumption > % of total: CO2 emissions from gaseous fuel consumption (% of total). Carbon dioxide emissions from liquid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of natural gas as an energy source.
  • Water > Drinking water > Population with improved sanitation > Rural: Proportion of the population using improved sanitation facilities, rural.
  • Climate change > CO2 emissions from other sectors, excluding residential buildings and commercial and public services > % of total fuel combustion: CO2 emissions from other sectors, excluding residential buildings and commercial and public services (% of total fuel combustion). CO2 emissions from other sectors, less residential buildings and commercial and public services, contains the emissions from commercial/institutional activities, residential, agriculture/forestry, fishing and other emissions not specified elsewhere that are included in the IPCC Source/Sink Categories 1 A 4 and 1 A 5. In the 1996 IPCC Guidelines, the category also includes emissions from autoproducers in the commercial/residential/agricultural sectors that generate electricity and/or heat. The IEA data are not collected in a way that allows the energy consumption to be split by specific end-use and therefore, autoproducers are shown as a separate item (Unallocated Autoproducers).
  • Water pollution > Paper and pulp industry > % of total BOD emissions: Industry shares of emissions of organic water pollutants refer to emissions from manufacturing activities as defined by two-digit divisions of the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), revision 2: paper and pulp (34). Emissions of organic water pollutants are measured by biochemical oxygen demand, which refers to the amount of oxygen that bacteria in water will consume in breaking down waste. This is a standard water-treatment test for the presence of organic pollutants.
  • Marine protected areas > % of territorial waters: Marine protected areas (% of territorial waters). Marine protected areas are areas of intertidal or subtidal terrain--and overlying water and associated flora and fauna and historical and cultural features--that have been reserved by law or other effective means to protect part or all of the enclosed environment.
  • Water > Prevalence of public-private partnerships: Cities.

    No date was available from the Wikipedia article, so we used the date of retrieval.

  • Climate change > CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production, total > % of total fuel combustion: CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production, total (% of total fuel combustion). CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production is the sum of three IEA categories of CO2 emissions: (1) Main Activity Producer Electricity and Heat which contains the sum of emissions from main activity producer electricity generation, combined heat and power generation and heat plants. Main activity producers (formerly known as public utilities) are defined as those undertakings whose primary activity is to supply the public. They may be publicly or privately owned. This corresponds to IPCC Source/Sink Category 1 A 1 a. For the CO2 emissions from fuel combustion (summary) file, emissions from own on-site use of fuel in power plants (EPOWERPLT) are also included. (2) Unallocated Autoproducers which contains the emissions from the generation of electricity and/or heat by autoproducers. Autoproducers are defined as undertakings that generate electricity and/or heat, wholly or partly for their own use as an activity which supports their primary activity. They may be privately or publicly owned. In the 1996 IPCC Guidelines, these emissions would normally be distributed between industry, transport and "other" sectors. (3) Other Energy Industries contains emissions from fuel combusted in petroleum refineries, for the manufacture of solid fuels, coal mining, oil and gas extraction and other energy-producing industries. This corresponds to the IPCC Source/Sink Categories 1 A 1 b and 1 A 1 c. According to the 1996 IPCC Guidelines, emissions from coke inputs to blast furnaces can either be counted here or in the Industrial Processes source/sink category. Within detailed sectoral calculations, certain non-energy processes can be distinguished. In the reduction of iron in a blast furnace through the combustion of coke, the primary purpose of the coke oxidation is to produce pig iron and the emissions can be considered as an industrial process. Care must be taken not to double count these emissions in both Energy and Industrial Processes. In the IEA estimations, these emissions have been included in this category.
  • Climate change > CO2 emissions from solid fuel consumption > % of total: CO2 emissions from solid fuel consumption (% of total). Carbon dioxide emissions from solid fuel consumption refer mainly to emissions from use of coal as an energy source.
  • Climate change > Other greenhouse gas emissions, HFC, PFC and SF6 > Thousand metric tons of CO2 equivalent: Other greenhouse gas emissions, HFC, PFC and SF6 (thousand metric tons of CO2 equivalent). Other greenhouse gas emissions are by-product emissions of hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride.
  • Emissions > Agricultural nitrous oxide emissions > % of total: Agricultural nitrous oxide emissions are emissions produced through fertilizer use (synthetic and animal manure), animal waste management, agricultural waste burning (nonenergy, on-site), and savannah burning."
STAT Cuba United States HISTORY
Adjusted net national income > Constant 2000 US$ $41.90 billion
Ranked 35th.
$11.13 trillion
Ranked 2nd. 266 times more than Cuba
Biodiversity > Mammal species, threatened 14
Ranked 66th.
36
Ranked 21st. 3 times more than Cuba
CFC > Consumption 39,954
Ranked 25th. 71% more than United States
23,385.2
Ranked 32nd.
CO2 Emissions per 1000 2.79
Ranked 75th.
19.86
Ranked 4th. 7 times more than Cuba
Climate change > CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production, total > Million metric tons 17.3
Ranked 62nd.
2,478.03
Ranked 2nd. 143 times more than Cuba

Climate change > CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production, total > Million metric tons per million 1.53
Ranked 68th.
7.95
Ranked 10th. 5 times more than Cuba

Current issues air and water pollution; biodiversity loss; deforestation air pollution resulting in acid rain in both the US and Canada; the US is the largest single emitter of carbon dioxide from the burning of fossil fuels; water pollution from runoff of pesticides and fertilizers; limited natural fresh water resources in much of the western part of the country require careful management; desertification
Ecological footprint 1.9
Ranked 26th.
12.22
Ranked 2nd. 6 times more than Cuba
Endangered species > Mammal species > Number 14
Ranked 59th.
37
Ranked 19th. 3 times more than Cuba
Forest area > Sq. km > Per capita 2.41 km² per 1,000 people
Ranked 106th.
10.22 km² per 1,000 people
Ranked 44th. 4 times more than Cuba

Marine fish catch 42,862 tons
Ranked 65th.
3.33 million tons
Ranked 7th. 78 times more than Cuba
Marine fish catch per 1000 3.86 tons
Ranked 65th.
11.93 tons
Ranked 42nd. 3 times more than Cuba
Proportion of land area under protection 12.41%
Ranked 116th.
13.82%
Ranked 111th. 11% more than Cuba

Waste > Local garbage collected 4.26 million tonnes
Ranked 29th.
222.86 million tonnes
Ranked 1st. 52 times more than Cuba

Water > Severe water stress 24.6
Ranked 47th.
31.3
Ranked 42nd. 27% more than Cuba
CO2 emissions > Kt 25,245.4 kt
Ranked 73th.
5.79 million kt
Ranked 1st. 229 times more than Cuba

Water > Drinking water > Population with improved drinking water sources > Urban and rural 93.75
Ranked 112th.
98.76
Ranked 62nd. 5% more than Cuba

Emissions > CO2 emissions > Metric tons per capita 2.41
Ranked 94th.
19.34
Ranked 10th. 8 times more than Cuba

Climate change > CO2 emissions > Metric tons per capita 3.4
Ranked 91st.
17.56
Ranked 10th. 5 times more than Cuba

Biodiversity > Bird species, threatened 17
Ranked 56th.
78
Ranked 9th. 5 times more than Cuba
Carbon efficiency 1.54 CO2 emissions/$ GDP
Ranked 47th.
1.77 CO2 emissions/$ GDP
Ranked 42nd. 15% more than Cuba
CO2 emissions > Kt per 1000 2.24 kt
Ranked 95th.
19.95 kt
Ranked 9th. 9 times more than Cuba

Endangered species > Bird species 17
Ranked 48th.
74
Ranked 7th. 4 times more than Cuba

Adjusted net national income > Constant 2000 US$ per capita $3,709.00
Ranked 38th.
$37,678.22
Ranked 6th. 10 times more than Cuba
SO2 emissions per populated area 1,730 thousand metric tons/squ
Ranked 35th. 3% more than United States
1,680 thousand metric tons/squ
Ranked 37th.
Waste > Hazardous waste created 1.42 million tonnes
Ranked 6th.
34.79 million tonnes
Ranked 2nd. 25 times more than Cuba

Waste > Local garbage collected per thousand people 377.68 tonnes
Ranked 40th.
754.15 tonnes
Ranked 5th. Twice as much as Cuba

Biodiversity > Fish species, threatened 35
Ranked 59th.
236
Ranked 1st. 7 times more than Cuba
Climate change > CO2 emissions > Kt 38,364.15
Ranked 70th.
5.43 million
Ranked 2nd. 142 times more than Cuba

CO2 emissions > Kt > Per capita 2.25 kt per 1,000 people
Ranked 100th.
19.9 kt per 1,000 people
Ranked 11th. 9 times more than Cuba

Endangered species > Fish species > Number 28
Ranked 39th.
164
Ranked 1st. 6 times more than Cuba
Water > Percent of water resources used 11.61%
Ranked 48th.
15.57%
Ranked 37th. 34% more than Cuba

Endangered species > Higher plant species > Number 163
Ranked 20th.
244
Ranked 12th. 50% more than Cuba

Pollution > Ozone depleting substance consumption 14.26
Ranked 76th.
1,627.68
Ranked 4th. 114 times more than Cuba

NOx emissions per populated area 0.16 thousand metric tons/squ
Ranked 100th.
1.29 thousand metric tons/squ
Ranked 13th. 8 times more than Cuba
Water > Dissolved oxygen concentration 8.1 mls/litre
Ranked 63th.
9.26 mls/litre
Ranked 33th. 14% more than Cuba
Climate change > CO2 emissions > Kt per 1000 3.4
Ranked 91st.
17.56
Ranked 10th. 5 times more than Cuba

Forest area > Sq. km 27,130 km²
Ranked 94th.
3.03 million km²
Ranked 4th. 112 times more than Cuba

Climate change > CO2 emissions > Kg per 2000 US$ of GDP $0.69
Ranked 57th. 73% more than United States
$0.40
Ranked 107th.

Sanitation > Population with improved sanitation > Urban and rural 92.08
Ranked 88th.
99.59
Ranked 40th. 8% more than Cuba

Emissions > CO2 emissions > Kt 27,032.99
Ranked 70th.
5.83 million
Ranked 2nd. 216 times more than Cuba

Pollution > Ozone depleting substance consumption per million people 1.26
Ranked 98th.
5.22
Ranked 48th. 4 times more than Cuba

Water > Availability 2.01 thousand cubic metres
Ranked 84th.
7.09 thousand cubic metres
Ranked 47th. 4 times more than Cuba
Water > Drinking water > Population with improved drinking water sources > Rural 86.42
Ranked 115th.
94.03
Ranked 85th. 9% more than Cuba

Biodiversity > Plant species > Higher, threatened 176
Ranked 20th.
270
Ranked 13th. 53% more than Cuba
Threatened species 36
Ranked 57th.
854
Ranked 1st. 24 times more than Cuba
Adjusted net national income > Current US$ per capita $4,514.67
Ranked 68th.
$41,448.39
Ranked 10th. 9 times more than Cuba

Waste > Population served by local garbage collection 75.4%
Ranked 31st.
100%
Ranked 24th. 33% more than Cuba

Biodiversity > Number 12.54
Ranked 26th.
94.22
Ranked 2nd. 8 times more than Cuba

Adjusted net national income > Current US$ $51.00 billion
Ranked 62nd.
$12.91 trillion
Ranked 2nd. 253 times more than Cuba

CFC > Consumption per 1000 3.62
Ranked 20th. 42 times more than United States
0.0858
Ranked 64th.
Waste > Hazardous waste created per thousand people 125.41 tonnes
Ranked 4th. 7% more than United States
117.72 tonnes
Ranked 5th.

Protected area 17.4%
Ranked 16th. 30% more than United States
13.4%
Ranked 26th.
Biodiversity > GEF benefits index for biodiversity > 0 = no biodiversity potential to 100 = maximum 12.54
Ranked 26th.
94.22
Ranked 2nd. 8 times more than Cuba

Freshwater > Renewable internal freshwater resources > Total > Billion cubic meters 38.12
Ranked 83th.
2,800
Ranked 6th. 73 times more than Cuba

Acidification 0.0
Ranked 76th.
13.74%
Ranked 25th.
Freshwater > Withdrawal 8.2
Ranked 45th.
477
Ranked 3rd. 58 times more than Cuba
Emissions > Methane emissions > Kt of CO2 equivalent 9,490
Ranked 69th.
810,280
Ranked 2nd. 85 times more than Cuba

Freshwater > Renewable internal freshwater resources per capita > Cubic meters 3,402.13
Ranked 78th.
9,199.18
Ranked 55th. 3 times more than Cuba

Pollution > PM10, country level > Micrograms per cubic meter 14.52
Ranked 158th.
17.78
Ranked 140th. 22% more than Cuba

Wetlands of intl importance > Area 452 thousand hectares
Ranked 32nd.
1,190 thousand hectares
Ranked 14th. 3 times more than Cuba
Biodiversity and protected areas > Terrestrial protected areas > Number 71
Ranked 78th.
6,770
Ranked 5th. 95 times more than Cuba
Proportion of land and marine area under protection 9.91%
Ranked 115th.
15.14%
Ranked 83th. 53% more than Cuba

Endangered species protection 88.9%
Ranked 34th. 2% more than United States
87.5%
Ranked 39th.
Climate change > CO2 emissions from other sectors, excluding residential buildings and commercial and public services > Million metric tons 1.21
Ranked 54th.
43.12
Ranked 3rd. 36 times more than Cuba

Biodiversity > GEF benefits index for biodiversity > 0 = no biodiversity potential to 100 = maximum per million 1.11
Ranked 57th. 4 times more than United States
0.31
Ranked 97th.

Sanitation > Population with improved sanitation > Rural 87.27%
Ranked 88th.
98.6%
Ranked 40th. 13% more than Cuba

Water > Drinking water > Population with improved drinking water sources > Urban 96.18
Ranked 127th.
99.77
Ranked 56th. 4% more than Cuba

Emissions > Nitrous oxide emissions > Thousand metric tons of CO2 equivalent 8,330
Ranked 64th.
456,210
Ranked 2nd. 55 times more than Cuba

Wildness 0.91%
Ranked 87th.
35.89%
Ranked 32nd. 39 times more than Cuba
Biosphere > Reserves area 1,384 thousand hectares
Ranked 31st.
31,570 thousand hectares
Ranked 3rd. 23 times more than Cuba
Forest area > Sq. km per 1000 2.4 km²
Ranked 103th.
10.26 km²
Ranked 44th. 4 times more than Cuba

Threatened species > Mammal 9
Ranked 90th.
35
Ranked 14th. 4 times more than Cuba
Water > Population supplied by water supply industry 92.4%
Ranked 15th. 9% more than United States
85%
Ranked 25th.
World Heritage Sites (environmental) 2
Ranked 39th.
12
Ranked 1st. 6 times more than Cuba
Known mammal species 31
Ranked 137th.
428
Ranked 4th. 14 times more than Cuba
Climate change > CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services > Million metric tons 0.64
Ranked 93th.
530.05
Ranked 2nd. 828 times more than Cuba

Freshwater > Annual freshwater withdrawals > Total > Billion cubic meters 8.2
Ranked 49th.
479.29
Ranked 3rd. 58 times more than Cuba
Pollution > Carbon dioxide 1999 6,926
Ranked 68th.
1.5 million
Ranked 1st. 217 times more than Cuba
Breeding birds threatened 13.14%
Ranked 8th. 58% more than United States
8.31%
Ranked 15th.
Climate change > CO2 emissions from solid fuel consumption > Kt per 1000 0.00683
Ranked 104th.
6.29
Ranked 8th. 922 times more than Cuba

Climate change > CO2 emissions from solid fuel consumption > Kt 77.01
Ranked 104th.
1.95 million
Ranked 2nd. 25269 times more than Cuba

Climate change > CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption > Kt per 1000 3.14
Ranked 54th.
6.97
Ranked 13th. 2 times more than Cuba

Climate change > CO2 emissions from gaseous fuel consumption > Kt 2,060.85
Ranked 86th.
1.29 million
Ranked 1st. 625 times more than Cuba

Climate change > CO2 emissions from gaseous fuel consumption > Kt per 1000 0.183
Ranked 84th.
4.17
Ranked 16th. 23 times more than Cuba

Climate change > Other greenhouse gas emissions, HFC, PFC and SF6 > Thousand metric tons of CO2 equivalent per million 20.03
Ranked 79th.
1,126.51
Ranked 1st. 56 times more than Cuba

Biodiversity and protected areas > Marine protected areas > Number 42
Ranked 19th.
787
Ranked 2nd. 19 times more than Cuba
Sanitation > Population with improved sanitation > Urban 93.67
Ranked 93th.
99.8
Ranked 43th. 7% more than Cuba

Emissions > Other greenhouse gas emissions > HFC > PFC and SF6 > Thousand metric tons of CO2 equivalent 110
Ranked 66th.
108,420
Ranked 3rd. 986 times more than Cuba

Urban SO2 concentration 1 micrograms/m3
Ranked 141st.
15.43 micrograms/m3
Ranked 114th. 15 times more than Cuba
Marine areas under protection 43
Ranked 12th.
229
Ranked 1st. 5 times more than Cuba
Water > Population connected to wastewater collecting system 35.9%
Ranked 21st.
71.4%
Ranked 14th. 99% more than Cuba

Water > Proportion of marine area under protection 7.62%
Ranked 62nd.
30.4%
Ranked 19th. 4 times more than Cuba

Pollution > Carbon dioxide 1999 per 1000 0.624
Ranked 92nd.
5.38
Ranked 8th. 9 times more than Cuba
Freshwater > Withdrawal per million 0.736
Ranked 35th.
1.69
Ranked 9th. 2 times more than Cuba
Emissions > PM10 > Country level > Micrograms per cubic meter 17.48
Ranked 150th.
21.34
Ranked 131st. 22% more than Cuba

Known mammal species per million 2.76
Ranked 121st. 86% more than United States
1.49
Ranked 135th.
Wetlands of intl importance > Area per million 40.31 thousand hectares
Ranked 27th. 10 times more than United States
4.14 thousand hectares
Ranked 76th.
Areas under protection per million 28.54
Ranked 23th. 2 times more than United States
12
Ranked 40th.
Water > Salinisation 515
Ranked 80th. 37% more than United States
375.65
Ranked 98th.
Areas under protection 321
Ranked 23th.
3,481
Ranked 7th. 11 times more than Cuba
Marine areas under protection per million 3.82
Ranked 8th. 5 times more than United States
0.789
Ranked 36th.
Biosphere > Reserves area per million 123.44 thousand hectares
Ranked 21st. 12% more than United States
109.76 thousand hectares
Ranked 25th.
Fertiliser > Consumption 467.52 hundred grams/hectare
Ranked 80th.
1,117.48 hundred grams/hectare
Ranked 48th. 2 times more than Cuba
Urban NO2 concentration 5 micrograms/m3
Ranked 139th.
60.57 micrograms/m3
Ranked 45th. 12 times more than Cuba
Non-wildness 21.04%
Ranked 14th. 3 times more than United States
6.59%
Ranked 49th.
Water pollution > Clay and glass industry > % of total BOD emissions 0.27%
Ranked 30th. 29% more than United States
0.21%
Ranked 31st.

Known breeding bird species per million 7.67
Ranked 109th. 4 times more than United States
1.77
Ranked 140th.
Water pollution > Metal industry > % of total BOD emissions 5%
Ranked 51st.
9.62%
Ranked 13th. 92% more than Cuba

Emissions > Agricultural methane emissions > % of total 62.38%
Ranked 34th. 3 times more than United States
18.38%
Ranked 102nd.

Climate change > CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption > Kt 35,423.22
Ranked 45th.
2.16 million
Ranked 1st. 61 times more than Cuba

Forest area > % of land area 24.7% of land area
Ranked 110th.
33.08% of land area
Ranked 83th. 34% more than Cuba

Adjusted savings > Adjusted savings > Particulate emission damage > % of GNI 0.07%
Ranked 112th.
0.14%
Ranked 86th. Twice as much as Cuba

Climate change > CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services > % of total fuel combustion 2.29%
Ranked 119th.
10.03%
Ranked 47th. 4 times more than Cuba

Water pollution > Food industry > % of total BOD emissions 78.39%
Ranked 7th. 86% more than United States
42.06%
Ranked 31st.

Adjusted savings > Adjusted savings > Net forest depletion > Current US$ 0.0
Ranked 99th.
0.0
Ranked 95th.

Adjusted savings > Adjusted savings > Energy depletion > Current US$ $1.45 billion
Ranked 60th.
$276.06 billion
Ranked 3rd. 191 times more than Cuba

Emissions > Industrial methane emissions > % of total 6.43%
Ranked 106th.
56.37%
Ranked 20th. 9 times more than Cuba

Emissions > CO2 intensity > Kg per kg of oil equivalent energy use 2.73
Ranked 28th. 10% more than United States
2.49
Ranked 52nd.

PM10 > Country level > Micrograms per cubic meter 19.11 mcg/m³
Ranked 150th.
22.63 mcg/m³
Ranked 140th. 18% more than Cuba

Natural gas rents > % of GDP 0.586%
Ranked 49th. 97 times more than United States
0.00603%
Ranked 78th.

Climate change > GHG net emissions/removals by LUCF > Mt of CO2 equivalent -21.654
Ranked 29th.
-990.062
Ranked 41st. 46 times more than Cuba

Freshwater > Annual freshwater withdrawals > Domestic > % of total freshwater withdrawal 19.02%
Ranked 55th. 50% more than United States
12.7%
Ranked 83th.

Adjusted savings > Adjusted savings > Mineral depletion > Current US$ $697.86 million
Ranked 28th.
$16.10 billion
Ranked 7th. 23 times more than Cuba

Freshwater > Annual freshwater withdrawals > Total > % of internal resources 21.51%
Ranked 51st. 26% more than United States
17.12%
Ranked 61st.
Adjusted net national income > Constant 2000 US$, % of GDP 68.9%
Ranked 25th.
88.62%
Ranked 31st. 29% more than Cuba
Adjusted net national income > Current US$, % of GDP 83.87%
Ranked 74th.
86.15%
Ranked 49th. 3% more than Cuba

Water pollution > Wood industry > % of total BOD emissions 0.67%
Ranked 91st.
4.24%
Ranked 14th. 6 times more than Cuba

Biodiversity and protected areas > Terrestrial protected areas > % of total surface area 18.79%
Ranked 51st.
27.08%
Ranked 26th. 44% more than Cuba
Water pollution > Other industry > % of total BOD emissions 2.67%
Ranked 66th.
13.9%
Ranked 5th. 5 times more than Cuba

Biodiversity and protected areas > Marine protected areas > % of total surface area 12.63%
Ranked 14th.
67.57%
Ranked 3rd. 5 times more than Cuba
Freshwater > Annual freshwater withdrawals > Industry > % of total freshwater withdrawal 12.2%
Ranked 54th.
46.05%
Ranked 20th. 4 times more than Cuba

Water > Phosphorus concentration 0.01 mls/litre
Ranked 137th.
0.08 mls/litre
Ranked 127th. 8 times more than Cuba
Freshwater > Withdrawal > Domestic 19%
Ranked 51st. 46% more than United States
13%
Ranked 68th.
Known breeding bird species 86
Ranked 140th.
508
Ranked 8th. 6 times more than Cuba
Water pollution > Textile industry > % of total BOD emissions 6.09%
Ranked 85th. 12% more than United States
5.42%
Ranked 40th.

Total natural resources rents > % of GDP 5.26%
Ranked 78th. 3 times more than United States
1.73%
Ranked 104th.

Pollution > Greenhouse gas emissions > United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change sign date June 13, 1992 June 12, 1992
Oil rents > % of GDP 3.06%
Ranked 44th. 3 times more than United States
0.933%
Ranked 53th.

Water pollution > Chemical industry > % of total BOD emissions 2.28%
Ranked 93th.
13.95%
Ranked 9th. 6 times more than Cuba

Freshwater > Annual freshwater withdrawals > Agriculture > % of total freshwater withdrawal 68.78%
Ranked 67th. 67% more than United States
41.26%
Ranked 107th.

Organic water pollutant > BOD emissions > Kg per day per worker 0.25 kg per day per worker
Ranked 13th. 92% more than United States
0.13 kg per day per worker
Ranked 47th.

Freshwater > Withdrawal > Agricultural 69%
Ranked 68th. 68% more than United States
41%
Ranked 108th.
International agreements > Signed but not ratified Marine Life Conservation Air Pollution-Persistent Organic Pollutants, Air Pollution-Volatile Organic Compounds, Biodiversity, Climate Change-Kyoto Protocol, Hazardous Wastes
Water > Suspended solids 4.33 mls/litre
Ranked 91st. 3% more than United States
4.19 mls/litre
Ranked 95th.
Climate change > CO2 emissions from liquid fuel consumption > % of total 92.33%
Ranked 54th. 2 times more than United States
39.68%
Ranked 152nd.

Climate change > CO2 emissions from residential buildings and commercial and public services > Million metric tons per million 0.0568
Ranked 105th.
1.7
Ranked 6th. 30 times more than Cuba

CO2 Emissions 31,353.9
Ranked 64th.
5.76 million
Ranked 1st. 184 times more than Cuba
Climate change > GHG net emissions/removals by LUCF > Mt of CO2 equivalent per million -1.972
Ranked 33th.
-3.227
Ranked 33th. 64% more than Cuba

Adjusted savings > Particulate emission damage > % of GNI 0.09% of GNI
Ranked 135th.
0.35% of GNI
Ranked 85th. 4 times more than Cuba

Climate change > CO2 emissions from gaseous fuel consumption > % of total 5.37%
Ranked 96th.
23.72%
Ranked 58th. 4 times more than Cuba

Water > Drinking water > Population with improved sanitation > Rural 87.27
Ranked 88th.
98.6
Ranked 40th. 13% more than Cuba

Climate change > CO2 emissions from other sectors, excluding residential buildings and commercial and public services > % of total fuel combustion 4.33%
Ranked 39th. 5 times more than United States
0.816%
Ranked 102nd.

Freshwater > Withdrawal > Industrial 12%
Ranked 38th.
46%
Ranked 6th. 4 times more than Cuba
Water pollution > Paper and pulp industry > % of total BOD emissions 4.63%
Ranked 91st.
10.61%
Ranked 35th. 2 times more than Cuba

Marine protected areas > % of territorial waters 1.32%
Ranked 107th.
2%
Ranked 95th. 51% more than Cuba

Water > Prevalence of public-private partnerships Havana 73 million people, including through PPPs 14% of water revenues without PPPs
Climate change > CO2 emissions from electricity and heat production, total > % of total fuel combustion 61.85%
Ranked 15th. 32% more than United States
46.87%
Ranked 45th.

Climate change > CO2 emissions from solid fuel consumption > % of total 0.201%
Ranked 109th.
35.82%
Ranked 33th. 178 times more than Cuba

Climate change > Other greenhouse gas emissions, HFC, PFC and SF6 > Thousand metric tons of CO2 equivalent 226
Ranked 75th.
348,460
Ranked 1st. 1542 times more than Cuba

Emissions > Agricultural nitrous oxide emissions > % of total 87.39%
Ranked 63th. 17% more than United States
74.74%
Ranked 90th.

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